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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. has agreed to buy for $750,000 the assets of Caliber Learning Network Inc., a corporate training company it helped create and that filed for bankruptcy in the spring. Caliber announced after the stock market closed yesterday that it has asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to authorize a sale of substantially all of its assets to Sylvan. The two companies, both based in Baltimore, signed an agreement Monday. The transaction is subject to approval by the bankruptcy court and could be undone if better offers are received by the court.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2001
YORK, Pa. - Two men testified in Mayor Charlie Robertson's defense yesterday, saying that he couldn't have given white gang members the ammunition they allegedly used during fatal 1969 race riots because he didn't have that type of bullets. John H. Blokzeyl, Robertson's former next-door neighbor, and retired York police officer James P. Brown took the stand yesterday morning just before both sides wrapped up testimony in the preliminary hearings for Robertson and eight others charged in the shooting death of Lillie Belle Allen.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
Caliber Learning Network Inc., a once-heralded technology start-up in the heart of Baltimore's proposed "Digital Harbor" that could never make its business model work, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection yesterday. The filing comes a week after the struggling online training company laid off three-quarters of its already downsized staff and announced that it would end its money losing "facilities-based training" business to focus on providing software and services for corporate training.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
Caliber Learning Network Inc., the struggling Baltimore company that provides online training, said yesterday that it has laid off three-quarters of its staff, or 88 workers, and is refocusing its business. The publicly traded company said in a statement that it will focus on software and services for corporate training and has ended its "facilities-based training business." The news comes on the heels of announcements last month that Caliber was laying off one-third of its workers, the Nasdaq stock market was threatening to delist its shares and its chief executive, Chris L. Nguyen, had resigned.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Bad news came in threes yesterday for Caliber Learning Network Inc., the company that Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. launched to capitalize on the shift of corporate training programs onto the Internet: Its chief executive officer resigned, it laid off one-third of its staff and the Nasdaq stock market threatened to delist its sinking stock. The resignation of Chris L. Nguyen, the only chief executive officer in the five years since Sylvan spun off the company as a separate entity, took effect yesterday, the company said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2001
Caliber Learning Networks Inc., a Baltimore-based company founded five years ago by Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. and MCI WorldCom Inc., needs an "infusion of cash" to make it through the rest of the year, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Its losses increasing and revenue diminishing, the long-distance learning company requested an extension Tuesday from the SEC for filing its report for the first quarter that ended March 31. Caliber said that "management is currently negotiating with existing creditors and potential investors a plan that would allow the company to continue its operations through 2001."
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
Caliber Learning Network Inc., the Baltimore company that provides training online, reported yesterday that fourth-quarter sales fell 49 percent and its loss widened, and said it was trying to raise more money - either by securing capital, buying a smaller company or merging with a bigger one. The company said it would need another $10 million to $15 million to break even in 2001. Caliber's president and chief executive officer, Chris Nguyen, said it was difficult to speculate exactly how the money would be raised.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
Caliber Learning Network Inc., the Baltimore company that provides training online, has laid off 18 percent of its work force in an effort to ensure profitability and zero in on corporate training. The publicly traded company, founded in 1996, had offered training for companies and online classes for students at schools such as the Johns Hopkins University. About a year-and-a-half ago, Caliber decided to focus on corporate training and phase out the academic sector of its business, President and Chief Executive Officer Chris L. Nguyen said.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
Caliber Learning Network Inc., a Baltimore provider of online training, posted a third-quarter net loss that was nearly double the net loss it posted during the corresponding period of 1999. Caliber's net loss for the quarter that ended Sept. 30 was $8.8 million, or 70 cents per diluted share, compared with $4.7 million, or 38 cents per diluted share, in the like quarter last year. Caliber's total revenue dropped to $5.98 million, compared with $7.36 million during the third quarter of 1999.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
Baltimore police are inching closer to replacing their aging 9 mm weapons with more powerful .40-caliber guns, which they say would halt a threatening suspect more quickly and with less risk to bystanders. Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris has not made a final decision and has not set a timetable for doing so, a spokesman said yesterday. But a department evaluation of the .40-caliber weapon was recently completed, and it "appears to be potentially acceptable," said Maj. Michael Bass.
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