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By Newsday | July 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has stepped up its counternarcotics operations abroad and assisted Colombian authorities last month in tracking down a kingpin of the notorious Cali cartel, according to senior U.S. intelligence officials.Providing a rare glimpse of the Central Intelligence Agency's recent clandestine efforts at slowing the flow of drugs into the United States, the officials acknowledged that the agency had penetrated several drug cartels and boosted its caseload from a couple of operations annually in the 1980s to "more than a dozen" each year in the 1990s.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
Business was so brisk at S&F Check Cashers, a modest check-cashing concern in West New York, N.J., across the Hudson River from Manhattan, that the dollars it collected were reportedly sometimes hauled to the bank by an armored-car company.But as Marion Percell, an assistant U.S. attorney in Newark, observed, "A check-cashing service should be getting money from the bank, not sending it in."The service was part of what law enforcement officials here say was a larger conspiracy that sent as much as $60 million in drug profits back to the Cali cartel in Colombia under the cover of such mundane services as selling telephone debit cards and money orders, renting beepers and cashing checks.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In what officials said was a striking demonstration of the corrupting influence of drugs on the legal system, a former senior Justice Department official who once led efforts to extradite leaders of the Cali cocaine cartel in Colombia was indicted yesterday on charges of helping the cartel in a criminal conspiracy.Michael Abbell, who was one of 62 people accused in a Miami indictment of participating in a cocaine-smuggling conspiracy, was a section chief in the Justice Department's criminal division during the Reagan administration's war on drugs in the early 1980s.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
The apparent breakup of the Cali drug cartel in Colombia is good news if it curtails cocaine entering the United States. That would bring a shortage for retailers, a famine disappointing to customers and a price rise on the street. But the breakup would not alleviate the U.S. drugs-and-crime scourge if the services and sophistication of the Cali group merely popped up elsewhere and the supply of Andean cocaine continued unabated.The Cali cartel is just middle-men, albeit of great resources who corrupted their own government and brought business acumen to the distribution of mind-and-soul-destroying drugs on the American street.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Crusading journalist Manuel de Dios Unanue was killed 14 months ago on orders from the "highest levels" of a Colombian drug cartel because of his articles about the group, officials said in announcing the indictment of two suspects in the murder.Charged yesterday in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn were John Mena, 24, who allegedly ordered the killing on behalf of the Cali cartel, and Alejandro Wilson Mejia Velez, 18, the accused trigger man. Mr. Mena has been in jail since last June on a drug charge, and Mr. Mejia was arrested Saturday outside a rooming house in Miami.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
The apparent breakup of the Cali drug cartel in Colombia is good news if it curtails cocaine entering the United States. That would bring a shortage for retailers, a famine disappointing to customers and a price rise on the street. But the breakup would not alleviate the U.S. drugs-and-crime scourge if the services and sophistication of the Cali group merely popped up elsewhere and the supply of Andean cocaine continued unabated.The Cali cartel is just middle-men, albeit of great resources who corrupted their own government and brought business acumen to the distribution of mind-and-soul-destroying drugs on the American street.
NEWS
June 7, 1995
Devotees of the "Godfather" films will hardly be surprised by the arrest of six American lawyers, including three former Justice Department officials, on charges of "going far beyond zealous legal representation" in protecting and aiding clients high in the echelons of the dangerously powerful Cali drug cartel operating out of Colombia.Heretofore, U.S. efforts to combat crime-spawning drug traffic have focused mainly on Colombian cocaine kings who have turned their country into a narco-democracy.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- As Colombia makes progress in beating down the powerful Medellin drug cartel, other traffickers increasingly are taking control of the country's multimillion-dollar cocaine business.The operations of Medellin drug lords Jorge Luis, Fabio and Juan David Ochoa -- who recently surrendered to Colombian authorities -- and Pablo Escobar, the object of a massive manhunt, have suffered severe setbacks because of police assaults and raids.But over the past few months, as Medellin has faded, the Cali cartel and independent traffickers have increased their market share from 20 percent to 45 percent of cocaine exports.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore are seeking civil forfeiture of $1.7 million seized from the recent sale of a commercial ship linked to the Colombian Cali drug cartel and the Sept. 4 shooting death of local shipper John R. Shotto.The government's complaint, filed late Monday in U.S. District Court here, also seeks the forfeiture of $38,000 in cash that federal agents seized at Baltimore-Washington International Airport three years ago from Ernesto Forero-Orjuela, who has family ties to the Cali cartel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
Business was so brisk at S&F Check Cashers, a modest check-cashing concern in West New York, N.J., across the Hudson River from Manhattan, that the dollars it collected were reportedly sometimes hauled to the bank by an armored-car company.But as Marion Percell, an assistant U.S. attorney in Newark, observed, "A check-cashing service should be getting money from the bank, not sending it in."The service was part of what law enforcement officials here say was a larger conspiracy that sent as much as $60 million in drug profits back to the Cali cartel in Colombia under the cover of such mundane services as selling telephone debit cards and money orders, renting beepers and cashing checks.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has stepped up its counternarcotics operations abroad and assisted Colombian authorities last month in tracking down a kingpin of the notorious Cali cartel, according to senior U.S. intelligence officials.Providing a rare glimpse of the Central Intelligence Agency's recent clandestine efforts at slowing the flow of drugs into the United States, the officials acknowledged that the agency had penetrated several drug cartels and boosted its caseload from a couple of operations annually in the 1980s to "more than a dozen" each year in the 1990s.
NEWS
June 7, 1995
Devotees of the "Godfather" films will hardly be surprised by the arrest of six American lawyers, including three former Justice Department officials, on charges of "going far beyond zealous legal representation" in protecting and aiding clients high in the echelons of the dangerously powerful Cali drug cartel operating out of Colombia.Heretofore, U.S. efforts to combat crime-spawning drug traffic have focused mainly on Colombian cocaine kings who have turned their country into a narco-democracy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In what officials said was a striking demonstration of the corrupting influence of drugs on the legal system, a former senior Justice Department official who once led efforts to extradite leaders of the Cali cocaine cartel in Colombia was indicted yesterday on charges of helping the cartel in a criminal conspiracy.Michael Abbell, who was one of 62 people accused in a Miami indictment of participating in a cocaine-smuggling conspiracy, was a section chief in the Justice Department's criminal division during the Reagan administration's war on drugs in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Federal authorities have established a link between the assassination last year of a crusading anti-drug journalist in New York and the 1991 execution-style murders of a Baltimore waterfront businessman and a hardware store chain vice president.In a series of interviews, law enforcement officials said the murders of John R. Shotto, a financially troubled entrepreneur in Baltimore, and Raymond Nicholson, vice president of the Hechinger Co., resulted from an order by the Cali cocaine cartel based in Colombia.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Crusading journalist Manuel de Dios Unanue was killed 14 months ago on orders from the "highest levels" of a Colombian drug cartel because of his articles about the group, officials said in announcing the indictment of two suspects in the murder.Charged yesterday in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn were John Mena, 24, who allegedly ordered the killing on behalf of the Cali cartel, and Alejandro Wilson Mejia Velez, 18, the accused trigger man. Mr. Mena has been in jail since last June on a drug charge, and Mr. Mejia was arrested Saturday outside a rooming house in Miami.
NEWS
By JUAN GONZALEZ | April 7, 1992
With mob boss John Gotti trading in his silk suits for a lifetime of polyester prison garb, Tommy Gambino permanently banned from the garment industry and Vic Orena facing a murder rap, the current generation of Italian gangsters is mostly filed in the garbage can of New York crime history.Who will all those veteran detectives and FBI agents who built careers tracking the inner workings of the five families go after now? And what area of crime will those Hollywood producers glamorize next?
NEWS
By JUAN GONZALEZ | April 7, 1992
With mob boss John Gotti trading in his silk suits for a lifetime of polyester prison garb, Tommy Gambino permanently banned from the garment industry and Vic Orena facing a murder rap, the current generation of Italian gangsters is mostly filed in the garbage can of New York crime history.Who will all those veteran detectives and FBI agents who built careers tracking the inner workings of the five families go after now? And what area of crime will those Hollywood producers glamorize next?
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Federal authorities have established a link between the assassination last year of a crusading anti-drug journalist in New York and the 1991 execution-style murders of a Baltimore waterfront businessman and a hardware store chain vice president.In a series of interviews, law enforcement officials said the murders of John R. Shotto, a financially troubled entrepreneur in Baltimore, and Raymond Nicholson, vice president of the Hechinger Co., resulted from an order by the Cali cocaine cartel based in Colombia.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore are seeking civil forfeiture of $1.7 million seized from the recent sale of a commercial ship linked to the Colombian Cali drug cartel and the Sept. 4 shooting death of local shipper John R. Shotto.The government's complaint, filed late Monday in U.S. District Court here, also seeks the forfeiture of $38,000 in cash that federal agents seized at Baltimore-Washington International Airport three years ago from Ernesto Forero-Orjuela, who has family ties to the Cali cartel.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- As Colombia makes progress in beating down the powerful Medellin drug cartel, other traffickers increasingly are taking control of the country's multimillion-dollar cocaine business.The operations of Medellin drug lords Jorge Luis, Fabio and Juan David Ochoa -- who recently surrendered to Colombian authorities -- and Pablo Escobar, the object of a massive manhunt, have suffered severe setbacks because of police assaults and raids.But over the past few months, as Medellin has faded, the Cali cartel and independent traffickers have increased their market share from 20 percent to 45 percent of cocaine exports.
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