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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
Health officials have confirmed a case of rabies in a 6-week-old Jersey calf at an educational center in Prince George's County where elementary and middle school students learned about farming and natural resources in the Potomac River watershed. Officials with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene have made it a priority to assess about 70 children who recently visited the Hard Bargain Farm in Accokeek. In particular, they are investigating whether any children participated in bottle feeding the calf whose mother died in an accident, said Katherine Feldman, a state public health veterinarian.
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NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun reporter | August 1, 2008
A female dolphin calf that was born Sunday at the National Aquarium in Baltimore appears to be in "robust health," but her survival for the critical first year will depend on her mother, aquarium officials said yesterday. Chesapeake, a 16-year-old Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, gave birth at 7:13 a.m. to a 30-pound, 2- to 3-foot-long calf - her third since 1992. The mother will not appear in any shows for at least another year, a spokeswoman said. The birth comes about two weeks after the loss of a dolphin male calf, which was stillborn July 14. Aquarium officials are awaiting the results of a necropsy at the Johns Hopkins University's comparative pathology lab. "Since we put so much time and care into these animals, we're very excited with this calf's arrival," aquarium spokeswoman Jen Bloomer said.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
One of the two pregnant dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore gave birth to a stillborn calf early last week, aquarium officials reported yesterday. Shiloh, a 29-year-old Atlantic bottlenose, was in labor for 40 minutes in the early-morning hours of July 14. About 3 a.m., she gave birth to a stillborn calf weighing almost 32 pounds. "It's always very hard to report things like this. When it's a baby, it breaks our heart," said Sue Hunter, director of marine mammal training. "Nobody wants to see it end this way."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
His mom, at a mere 7,490 pounds, is described as "petite." But zookeepers say Maryland's newest African elephant - 290 pounds and 42 inches tall - is a whopper. No matter how one measures him, the baby African elephant born Wednesday night at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is the first ever at the 132-year-old institution, and it may be the first pachyderm delivered here since the last woolly mammoth gave birth during the last Ice Age, 12,000 years ago. If he remains healthy, he seems sure to be a local celebrity for years to come.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 22, 2007
We should all have something to be thankful for at dinnertime today. But a newborn bottlenose dolphin at the National Aquarium in Baltimore has more than most. The arrival of the male calf, born at the aquarium Sept. 9, has stimulated three unrelated females in his pool to produce milk. One of the three had never been pregnant. Evidently charmed by the playful new arrival, two of the grown females have taken over the nursing chores from his biological mother, and he has nearly doubled his 36-pound birthweight.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | July 3, 2007
WIMBLEDON, England -- Serena Williams bunny-hopped three times on her one and a half legs, set herself inside the baseline to await the final serve, then took the ball on the rise and jammed it back cross-court hard enough to handcuff Daniela Hantuchova yesterday and deliver the decisive blow to the tall, bewildered Slovakian. Williams might have been as distraught as everyone else here about the incessant rain that has pelted Wimbledon for most of the first eight days, but she isn't likely to complain about it again.
SPORTS
By Compiled from interviews and other newspapers' reports | October 1, 2006
The New York Mets have been baseball's best team. They practically wrapped up the National League East before Memorial Day and they seemingly score 15 runs a game. A month ago, they were penciled in to the World Series. Well, get the erasers out. Because Pedro Martinez has a new daddy: his calves. Dominant pitching wins titles. And, when on his game, Martinez projects dominance. He's 6-2 in the postseason with a 3.40 ERA, and that includes hiccups against his old daddy, the New York Yankees.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
ASHBURN, Va. -- Washington Redskins quarterback Mark Brunell sat out yesterday afternoon's practice after getting kicked in the calf during the morning workout, but coach Joe Gibbs said that he didn't think the injury was serious. With Brunell unable to practice, it gave Gibbs and offensive coordinator Al Saunders more of an opportunity to measure the progress of Jason Campbell and to see whether the second-year quarterback is continuing to make strides in assuming the backup role ahead of veteran Todd Collins.
SPORTS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2006
Blast starting goalie Sagu pulled a calf muscle yesterday and is questionable for tomorrow night's Game 1 of the Major Indoor Soccer League championship series with the St. Louis Steamers. Sagu said he hurt himself while loosening up for practice. He stopped to get it looked at, and backup goalie Sanaldo spent the entire workout in goal. Sagu left practice on crutches and went to a doctor, who confirmed the muscle pull and put the goalie on anti-inflammatory medication. "I [heard] my calf pop a little bit in practice," Sagu said.
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