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Caleb Stine

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NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 2, 2008
On the Baltimore indie music scene, where most artists completely dissolve styles in an attempt to concoct something fresh, Caleb Stine sticks earnestly to the dusty acoustic sounds of Americana. His songs - evocative of campfires and sparse windswept landscapes - echo his influences, namely Hank Williams and Woody Guthrie. October 29th, Stine's independently released debut with his band the Brakemen, came out in May 2006. Since then, the Colorado-born artist, a Remington resident for the past eight years, has regularly toured the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013
Nicholas Sjostrom, a Baltimore music producer, is stepping outside the studio and in front of a microphone. Sjostrom, a Chicago native who lives in Hampden, grew up playing music and studied sound engineering in college. The 34-year-old songwriter and sound designer (he does post-production audio for TV and radio in Baltimore) has worked on projects with local musicians Caleb Stine and Ellen Cherry, but has now decided to debut his own original tunes. "Working exclusively on music projects really wore me out," said Sjostrom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013
Nicholas Sjostrom, a Baltimore music producer, is stepping outside the studio and in front of a microphone. Sjostrom, a Chicago native who lives in Hampden, grew up playing music and studied sound engineering in college. The 34-year-old songwriter and sound designer (he does post-production audio for TV and radio in Baltimore) has worked on projects with local musicians Caleb Stine and Ellen Cherry, but has now decided to debut his own original tunes. "Working exclusively on music projects really wore me out," said Sjostrom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Even after breaking up, the Bridge can't let fall pass by without taking a Baltimore stage. The roots-rock six-piece, which broke up last November after its annual Thanksgiving Eve headlining show at Rams Head Live, will reunite for one night only on Saturday at the Maryland Science Center (601 Light St.). Tickets, available here ($30 for 18+, $40 for 21+), are on sale now. Proceeds from the reunion show will go toward Believe in Music, a non-profit organization aiming to "uplift underprivileged Baltimore City students academically, culturally and spiritually" through music education, according to a press release.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2009
SATURDAY INNER HARBOR ART FESTIVAL: In this juried show that takes place at the Power Plant, 601 E. Pratt St., and at Power Plant Live, 34 Market Place, 150 regional and national artists offer more than $15 million worth of creative work for sale. Items available include leather bags, clocks, pottery, collages, photographs and jewelry. The event is free and takes place from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Go to artfestival.com. CHARM CITY ROLLER GIRLS: It's a double-header against Philly when the tough-as-nails Female Trouble takes on Philadelphia's B team, Independence Dolls, and the Charm City All Stars' ladies go head-to-head with the Liberty Belles at Du Burns Arena, 1301 S. Ellwood Ave., from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets are $5-$20.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Even after breaking up, the Bridge can't let fall pass by without taking a Baltimore stage. The roots-rock six-piece, which broke up last November after its annual Thanksgiving Eve headlining show at Rams Head Live, will reunite for one night only on Saturday at the Maryland Science Center (601 Light St.). Tickets, available here ($30 for 18+, $40 for 21+), are on sale now. Proceeds from the reunion show will go toward Believe in Music, a non-profit organization aiming to "uplift underprivileged Baltimore City students academically, culturally and spiritually" through music education, according to a press release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Compared with a country music mecca like Nashville, Baltimore's country scene might seem almost nonexistent. But for local honky-tonk singer/songwriter Arty Hill, that's not necessarily a bad thing. "In Nashville, you're working in the shadow of modern country music - which is pop music - and it's a big shadow to be working in," Hill said. "Here, there are no boundaries. We can do whatever we want. I get to do honky-tonk at Rams Head Live. That's pretty awesome when you think about it. There's nobody in Baltimore shoving Toby Keith down people's throats."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
In 2009, Baltimore singer/songwriter ellen cherry was temporarily sidelined with a nasty throat infection. Unable to sing, she sat down at her upright piano and began writing the songs which would later become her new album, "Please Don't Sell the Piano. " It's about as bare-bones as you can get; while there are a few string arrangements, most of the album is just the piano and cherry's intimate, heartwarming voice. Produced by Baltimore Americana singer/songwriter Caleb Stine, "Please Don't Sell the Piano" is cherry's most personal album.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2010
Fifteen freshmen from the Maryland Institute College of Art went out last fall looking for Baltimore. What they found has been distilled into a four-panel wheeled mural, which is being displayed at Penn Station through this month. In the process, the students, many of whom were new to the area, not only became comfortable in their adopted city, but were charmed by it. They spent hours tramping through neighborhoods and talking to the people they met. "I'm surprised that people who live here don't appreciate Baltimore more," says MICA freshman Emily Wooten, who worked on the third panel of the mural.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Mick Benham and his friends were supposed to be roughing it this weekend - just a campfire and a couple of tents high up on a Pennsylvania mountain. "It's testing your manhood, that kind of thing," he says of the yearly winter camping trips. But there's testing your manhood and then there's testing your manhood. Benham can handle no running water and below-freezing temperatures, but missing tonight's Ravens playoff game is one sacrifice that he's not willing to make. "I'll have my Ravens flag flying high upon the mountaintop Saturday," the 29-year-old computer technician promises, even if that means roughing it a little less than tradition would normally dictate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
In 2009, Baltimore singer/songwriter ellen cherry was temporarily sidelined with a nasty throat infection. Unable to sing, she sat down at her upright piano and began writing the songs which would later become her new album, "Please Don't Sell the Piano. " It's about as bare-bones as you can get; while there are a few string arrangements, most of the album is just the piano and cherry's intimate, heartwarming voice. Produced by Baltimore Americana singer/songwriter Caleb Stine, "Please Don't Sell the Piano" is cherry's most personal album.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2010
Fifteen freshmen from the Maryland Institute College of Art went out last fall looking for Baltimore. What they found has been distilled into a four-panel wheeled mural, which is being displayed at Penn Station through this month. In the process, the students, many of whom were new to the area, not only became comfortable in their adopted city, but were charmed by it. They spent hours tramping through neighborhoods and talking to the people they met. "I'm surprised that people who live here don't appreciate Baltimore more," says MICA freshman Emily Wooten, who worked on the third panel of the mural.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Mick Benham and his friends were supposed to be roughing it this weekend - just a campfire and a couple of tents high up on a Pennsylvania mountain. "It's testing your manhood, that kind of thing," he says of the yearly winter camping trips. But there's testing your manhood and then there's testing your manhood. Benham can handle no running water and below-freezing temperatures, but missing tonight's Ravens playoff game is one sacrifice that he's not willing to make. "I'll have my Ravens flag flying high upon the mountaintop Saturday," the 29-year-old computer technician promises, even if that means roughing it a little less than tradition would normally dictate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Compared with a country music mecca like Nashville, Baltimore's country scene might seem almost nonexistent. But for local honky-tonk singer/songwriter Arty Hill, that's not necessarily a bad thing. "In Nashville, you're working in the shadow of modern country music - which is pop music - and it's a big shadow to be working in," Hill said. "Here, there are no boundaries. We can do whatever we want. I get to do honky-tonk at Rams Head Live. That's pretty awesome when you think about it. There's nobody in Baltimore shoving Toby Keith down people's throats."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2009
SATURDAY INNER HARBOR ART FESTIVAL: In this juried show that takes place at the Power Plant, 601 E. Pratt St., and at Power Plant Live, 34 Market Place, 150 regional and national artists offer more than $15 million worth of creative work for sale. Items available include leather bags, clocks, pottery, collages, photographs and jewelry. The event is free and takes place from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Go to artfestival.com. CHARM CITY ROLLER GIRLS: It's a double-header against Philly when the tough-as-nails Female Trouble takes on Philadelphia's B team, Independence Dolls, and the Charm City All Stars' ladies go head-to-head with the Liberty Belles at Du Burns Arena, 1301 S. Ellwood Ave., from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets are $5-$20.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 2, 2008
On the Baltimore indie music scene, where most artists completely dissolve styles in an attempt to concoct something fresh, Caleb Stine sticks earnestly to the dusty acoustic sounds of Americana. His songs - evocative of campfires and sparse windswept landscapes - echo his influences, namely Hank Williams and Woody Guthrie. October 29th, Stine's independently released debut with his band the Brakemen, came out in May 2006. Since then, the Colorado-born artist, a Remington resident for the past eight years, has regularly toured the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 3, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Burke Sampson, electric guitar; Nick Sjostrom, electric bass; E.J. Shaul-Thompson, drums; Caleb Stine, acoustic guitar and vocals; Andy Stack, upright bass; Jenn Wasner, vocals. Founded in --2005 Style --indie folk rock Influenced by --Hank Williams Sr., Townes Van Zandt, the Carter family, Graham Parsons Notable --The group recently recorded a pair of songs for a short EP called Come Back Home. One is "Flame in My Heart," a George Jones cover, and the other is an original.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 14, 2008
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Ryan Finnerin, vocals and guitar; Jason Butcher, drums; Micah Huerta, keyboards; Denny Finnerin, backing vocals; Neil Cotterill, guitar; Eric Bloodsworth, bass; Amy Cavanaugh, cello Founded in --2005 Style --folk rock Influenced by --Wilco, Spoon, Elliott Smith, the Beatles Notable --Ryan Finnerin composed, arranged and recorded the lion's share of the instrumentation on the debut album, Everyday Needles for...
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 3, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Burke Sampson, electric guitar; Nick Sjostrom, electric bass; E.J. Shaul-Thompson, drums; Caleb Stine, acoustic guitar and vocals; Andy Stack, upright bass; Jenn Wasner, vocals. Founded in --2005 Style --indie folk rock Influenced by --Hank Williams Sr., Townes Van Zandt, the Carter family, Graham Parsons Notable --The group recently recorded a pair of songs for a short EP called Come Back Home. One is "Flame in My Heart," a George Jones cover, and the other is an original.
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