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NEWS
By George Diaz, Tribune Newspapers | August 24, 2011
Depending on your maturity level, NASCAR's "boys, have at it" laissez-faire attitude is spectacular or the most idiotic form of reality TV on the planet. The second notion may be a reach, as long as the mutants from "Jersey Shore" inhabit the earth, but NASCAR seems to have taken its business to an art form in terms of immaturity. Please call the Kindergarten Cops. Somebody just got his hair pulled. That's right. We had another royal rumble last weekend, fresh on the heels of the Boris Said-Greg Biffle sparring session at Watkins Glen, where Said called Biffle a "scaredy-cat" and asked fans to text him Biffle's address so he could beat him up. Now this: Jerry Baxter, the crew chief for Patrick Carpentier, pulled the hair of Steven Wallace after Saturday's Nationwide Series race in Montreal.
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NEWS
By George Diaz, Tribune Newspapers | August 24, 2011
Depending on your maturity level, NASCAR's "boys, have at it" laissez-faire attitude is spectacular or the most idiotic form of reality TV on the planet. The second notion may be a reach, as long as the mutants from "Jersey Shore" inhabit the earth, but NASCAR seems to have taken its business to an art form in terms of immaturity. Please call the Kindergarten Cops. Somebody just got his hair pulled. That's right. We had another royal rumble last weekend, fresh on the heels of the Boris Said-Greg Biffle sparring session at Watkins Glen, where Said called Biffle a "scaredy-cat" and asked fans to text him Biffle's address so he could beat him up. Now this: Jerry Baxter, the crew chief for Patrick Carpentier, pulled the hair of Steven Wallace after Saturday's Nationwide Series race in Montreal.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2002
BRISTOL, Tenn. - Winston Cup driver Sterling Marlin remembers when his father, Coo Coo, raced at Bristol Motor Speedway two decades and more ago. The track was flat. Fewer than 25,000 people were in the stands. The cars weren't nearly so equal. The winner's closest challenger was sometimes two, three laps behind. Now, they race bumper to bumper. Breathe one another's exhaust. Have every move scrutinized by 160,000 pairs of eyes in the grandstands and a national television audience. In the pits, crew chiefs smile as their drivers gasp breathlessly in their ears.
SPORTS
By George Diaz and George Diaz,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 29, 2004
BRISTOL, Tenn. - His victory lap was serenaded by a chorus of boos and beer cans being tossed from the grandstands. Just a hunch, perhaps, that Kurt Busch isn't a guy folks have embraced into their NASCAR family of folksy veterans and spunky young guns. Still, the guy who doesn't fit the typical Nextel NASCAR profile was the only driver smiling at day's end after bringing his Roush Racing Ford to victory yesterday during an anticlimactic two-lap shootout at the Food City 500. Busch, 25, continued the young man's dominance of this sport in the early season by holding off veteran Rusty Wallace to win his third consecutive race here and fourth in five tries before a rambunctious crowd of 160,000.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
DOVER, Del. -- Bill Elliott is from Dawsonville, Ga., and that means his philosophy is firmly rooted in the unavoidable realities of life.Winning is a wonderful thing, Elliott knows. But it is not everything. In fact, Elliott is more a Boris Becker than a Vince Lombardi. Like Becker, he'd sometimes rather have a good time playing the game, even if it means losing.But good times only go so far. Until yesterday afternoon, Elliott had not won a Winston Cup stock car race in 10 months.He hadn't won in 23 races, a long time for a man who in 1985 won 11 superspeedway races, collected the Winston Million Dollar bonus for winning the Daytona 500, the Winston 500 and the Southern 500 all in the same season and made the cover of Sports Illustrated for an unsurpassed performance that earned $2,433,187 in a single season.
SPORTS
By George Diaz and George Diaz,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 29, 2004
BRISTOL, Tenn. - His victory lap was serenaded by a chorus of boos and beer cans being tossed from the grandstands. Just a hunch, perhaps, that Kurt Busch isn't a guy folks have embraced into their NASCAR family of folksy veterans and spunky young guns. Still, the guy who doesn't fit the typical Nextel NASCAR profile was the only driver smiling at day's end after bringing his Roush Racing Ford to victory yesterday during an anticlimactic two-lap shootout at the Food City 500. Busch, 25, continued the young man's dominance of this sport in the early season by holding off veteran Rusty Wallace to win his third consecutive race here and fourth in five tries before a rambunctious crowd of 160,000.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
DARLINGTON, S.C. -- Success comes in its own good time in stock car racing, and the amount of work that goes into the effort often seems to have little to do with the outcome.In Mark Martin's mind, he raced better time after time earlier this season without a victory. Now, on a three-race winning streak, there is an edge that wasn't there before.And Martin, instead of being unabashedly pleased with his success, is uncharacteristically reserved about being the hottest driver on the Winston Cup circuit.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Sterling Marlin looked in his rearview mirror and saw a shark. A big, black shark roaring up behind him, eating up the field. But Sterling Marlin, who had won only one other race in his Winston Cup career before yesterday, didn't flinch.Dale Earnhardt, the shark, may well be stock car racing's newest seven-time Winston Cup champion, but he never had won the Daytona 500, not in 16 previous tries. And Sterling Marlin had.So when Marlin looked in that rearview mirror, he remembered that.
SPORTS
February 14, 2004
Moves Baseball ATHLETICS: Agreed to one-year, $965,000 contract with P Chad Bradford, who had requested $1.125 million in arbitration; the team had offered $850,000. DIAMONDBACKS: Agreed to one-year, $2.6 million contract with 3B Shea Hillenbrand, who had requested $2.9 million in arbitration; the team had offered $2.4 million. DODGERS: Named Frank McCourt chairman and Jamie McCourt vice chairman. PHILLIES: Agreed to one-year, $3.95 million contract with 2B Placido Polanco, wo had requested $4.5 million in arbitration; the team had offered $3.4 million.
SPORTS
May 31, 1992
Marylanders and Delawareans in NASCAR:* EDDIE DICKERSON, Milford, Del. -- Crew chief for Rusty Wallace. Has worked for Darrell Waltrip, Cale Yarborough, Harry Gant, Terry Labonte and Buddy Arrington. Won mechanic-of-the-race honors when Wallace finished second at the First Union 400 in North Wilkesboro, N.C., on April 12.* ELMO LANGLEY, Landover -- Drives pace car for NASCAR and is inspector for NASCAR, helping inspect the top five finishers in each race. Beat Cale Yarborough in 1991 Legends Race at Charlotte.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2002
BRISTOL, Tenn. - Winston Cup driver Sterling Marlin remembers when his father, Coo Coo, raced at Bristol Motor Speedway two decades and more ago. The track was flat. Fewer than 25,000 people were in the stands. The cars weren't nearly so equal. The winner's closest challenger was sometimes two, three laps behind. Now, they race bumper to bumper. Breathe one another's exhaust. Have every move scrutinized by 160,000 pairs of eyes in the grandstands and a national television audience. In the pits, crew chiefs smile as their drivers gasp breathlessly in their ears.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Sterling Marlin looked in his rearview mirror and saw a shark. A big, black shark roaring up behind him, eating up the field. But Sterling Marlin, who had won only one other race in his Winston Cup career before yesterday, didn't flinch.Dale Earnhardt, the shark, may well be stock car racing's newest seven-time Winston Cup champion, but he never had won the Daytona 500, not in 16 previous tries. And Sterling Marlin had.So when Marlin looked in that rearview mirror, he remembered that.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
DARLINGTON, S.C. -- Success comes in its own good time in stock car racing, and the amount of work that goes into the effort often seems to have little to do with the outcome.In Mark Martin's mind, he raced better time after time earlier this season without a victory. Now, on a three-race winning streak, there is an edge that wasn't there before.And Martin, instead of being unabashedly pleased with his success, is uncharacteristically reserved about being the hottest driver on the Winston Cup circuit.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
DOVER, Del. -- Bill Elliott is from Dawsonville, Ga., and that means his philosophy is firmly rooted in the unavoidable realities of life.Winning is a wonderful thing, Elliott knows. But it is not everything. In fact, Elliott is more a Boris Becker than a Vince Lombardi. Like Becker, he'd sometimes rather have a good time playing the game, even if it means losing.But good times only go so far. Until yesterday afternoon, Elliott had not won a Winston Cup stock car race in 10 months.He hadn't won in 23 races, a long time for a man who in 1985 won 11 superspeedway races, collected the Winston Million Dollar bonus for winning the Daytona 500, the Winston 500 and the Southern 500 all in the same season and made the cover of Sports Illustrated for an unsurpassed performance that earned $2,433,187 in a single season.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Car owner Robert Yates couldn't stop laughing as he said it. "I thought the most exciting race of the season was here last February," Yates said, recalling the Daytona 500. "I thought it was very exciting." Yates knows, as do many others, that the Daytona 500 was criticized as "the most boring" 500 in history. It was argued that restrictor plates limiting the cars' horsepower were detrimental to the sport. But Yates wasn't one of those doing the criticizing. His two Fords, with Dale Jarrett and Ricky Rudd at the wheels, started on the front row, and Jarrett came home the winner.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | July 5, 1991
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Sterling Marlin was golden in Pepsi 400 qualifying yesterday at Daytona International Speedway despite having to drive through a "sandstorm," and rolled to his first NASCAR Winston Cup Series pole with a lap of 190.331 mph.The Pepsi 400, midpoint race of the 29-event season, is scheduled for tomorrow at 11 a.m. (ESPN).Marlin was the only driver topping 190, and finishing second through fifth were Ford's Davey Allison, winner of three of the past five races; Harry Gant, Olds; Geoff Bodine, Marlin's teammate, in a Ford; and rookie Bobby Hamilton, Olds.
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