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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 23, 2002
NEW DELHI, India - Indian officials reportedly said a criminal gang with links to Pakistan's main intelligence agency claimed responsibility for an attack by four men on motorcycles who fired automatic rifles at police guarding a U.S. government building in Calcutta, India, Tuesday morning, killing four police officers. Indian police said 12 other police officers, a security guard and a pedestrian were injured, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said in Washington. All of those killed and injured were Indians.
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By Elizabeth Dole | August 24, 2010
It is a day forever emblazoned in my memory. It was Aug. 5, 1992, and I was serving as president of the American Red Cross. The renowned humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Mother Teresa was visiting Baltimore, and a meeting between the two of us had been arranged. I spent much of the hourlong trip from Washington, D.C. reflecting on the remarkable life story of the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in what is now Macedonia on Aug. 26, 1910 — 100 years ago this week. At 18, Agnes would leave home and embark on a seven-week sea journey that would take her to Calcutta, India, where she joined the Sisters of Loreto, an Irish-based religious order, and where she would adopt the name "Teresa.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Dole | August 24, 2010
It is a day forever emblazoned in my memory. It was Aug. 5, 1992, and I was serving as president of the American Red Cross. The renowned humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Mother Teresa was visiting Baltimore, and a meeting between the two of us had been arranged. I spent much of the hourlong trip from Washington, D.C. reflecting on the remarkable life story of the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in what is now Macedonia on Aug. 26, 1910 — 100 years ago this week. At 18, Agnes would leave home and embark on a seven-week sea journey that would take her to Calcutta, India, where she joined the Sisters of Loreto, an Irish-based religious order, and where she would adopt the name "Teresa.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 23, 2002
NEW DELHI, India - Indian officials reportedly said a criminal gang with links to Pakistan's main intelligence agency claimed responsibility for an attack by four men on motorcycles who fired automatic rifles at police guarding a U.S. government building in Calcutta, India, Tuesday morning, killing four police officers. Indian police said 12 other police officers, a security guard and a pedestrian were injured, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said in Washington. All of those killed and injured were Indians.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Mother Teresa's life was a lot more compelling than what's depicted in "Mother Teresa: In the Name of God's Poor," getting its premiere on the Family Channel tomorrow night.Not that the film is all that bad: In a rare TV performance, Geraldine Chaplin is appropriately anxious and accepting as the Albanian-born nun who answered God's call by devoting her life to the poorest of India's poor. And the film is imbued with tons of good will, even a few poignant moments that, by themselves, offer insights into the forces that drove this remarkable woman.
NEWS
April 29, 1992
Satyajit Ray, the great Indian film director who died last Thursday in Calcutta at age 70, will be remembered as one of the seminal voices of 20th century cinema. Although his works were not commercial hits at home -- like audiences elsewhere, Indian moviegoers preferred films that allowed them to forget the grimy realities of everyday life -- Mr. Ray's portraits of change in modern India were marked by eloquence, compassion and a simple humanity that won worldwide recognition for his art. Last month, he received an honorary Academy Award for lifetime achievement.
TRAVEL
January 17, 1999
The long voyage home; A Memorable TripBy Heidi Nevin : Special to the SunMy annual trip home to America is about to begin. I've been living and studying in India for the past two years and am finally going to get to see my parents and sister again, take hot baths and eat fresh strawberry-rhubarb pie. I am giddy with excitement. The only trouble is the trip itself, which I know will be grueling. Traversing half the planet Earth is never easy.I've done the trip before. I know the way, and I know the textures of all the different surfaces I will try to fall asleep on en route.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times | November 13, 1992
CITY OF JOY(Columbia TriStar)A routine story can seem wonderfully fresh if presented in an unfamiliar setting. Such is the case with "City of Joy," a finely woven tapestry of cross-cultures and similar souls that begins with the simplest thread of a story line.When things don't go smoothly for American surgeon Max Lowe Patrick Swayze), he abandons his career and heads to India to meditate and find himself. After being beaten and robbed, he is taken in by Joan Bethel, an Englishwoman (Pauline Collins)
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 9, 1992
Ram Chandra Biswas is no accidental tourist.Ten years ago, he saw a world threatened with nuclear annihilation and decided to act."I promised God I would sacrifice my life to world peace," Mr. Biswas said. To fulfill that vow, he climbed on his bicycle April 21, 1982, and vowed not to stop until he traveled the world, spreading a message of God's love.The 35-year-old native of Calcutta, India, who has been employed as a textile worker, journalist and painter, arrived in Baltimore on Sunday.
NEWS
By Sk. Azizur Rahman and Sk. Azizur Rahman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2000
CALCUTTA, India -- On India's streets, parks and tourist spots, countless people earn their bread by entertaining passers-by with monkeys. But a blacksmith in the eastern state of Orissa has given new meaning to the phrase "monkey business." Kalicharan Maharana employs two rhesus monkeys at his workshop to run the bellows of his charcoal oven. Animal lovers are outraged, and labor officials are dumbfounded, but Maharana doesn't understand what the fuss is about. Cows, elephants and other animals earn their keep, he points out. He befriended the monkeys when they came to his shop for food every day. "One day it struck me that, properly trained, they could probably do some jobs just like the average [human]
NEWS
By Sk. Azizur Rahman and Sk. Azizur Rahman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2000
CALCUTTA, India -- On India's streets, parks and tourist spots, countless people earn their bread by entertaining passers-by with monkeys. But a blacksmith in the eastern state of Orissa has given new meaning to the phrase "monkey business." Kalicharan Maharana employs two rhesus monkeys at his workshop to run the bellows of his charcoal oven. Animal lovers are outraged, and labor officials are dumbfounded, but Maharana doesn't understand what the fuss is about. Cows, elephants and other animals earn their keep, he points out. He befriended the monkeys when they came to his shop for food every day. "One day it struck me that, properly trained, they could probably do some jobs just like the average [human]
TRAVEL
January 17, 1999
The long voyage home; A Memorable TripBy Heidi Nevin : Special to the SunMy annual trip home to America is about to begin. I've been living and studying in India for the past two years and am finally going to get to see my parents and sister again, take hot baths and eat fresh strawberry-rhubarb pie. I am giddy with excitement. The only trouble is the trip itself, which I know will be grueling. Traversing half the planet Earth is never easy.I've done the trip before. I know the way, and I know the textures of all the different surfaces I will try to fall asleep on en route.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Mother Teresa's life was a lot more compelling than what's depicted in "Mother Teresa: In the Name of God's Poor," getting its premiere on the Family Channel tomorrow night.Not that the film is all that bad: In a rare TV performance, Geraldine Chaplin is appropriately anxious and accepting as the Albanian-born nun who answered God's call by devoting her life to the poorest of India's poor. And the film is imbued with tons of good will, even a few poignant moments that, by themselves, offer insights into the forces that drove this remarkable woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times | November 13, 1992
CITY OF JOY(Columbia TriStar)A routine story can seem wonderfully fresh if presented in an unfamiliar setting. Such is the case with "City of Joy," a finely woven tapestry of cross-cultures and similar souls that begins with the simplest thread of a story line.When things don't go smoothly for American surgeon Max Lowe Patrick Swayze), he abandons his career and heads to India to meditate and find himself. After being beaten and robbed, he is taken in by Joan Bethel, an Englishwoman (Pauline Collins)
NEWS
April 29, 1992
Satyajit Ray, the great Indian film director who died last Thursday in Calcutta at age 70, will be remembered as one of the seminal voices of 20th century cinema. Although his works were not commercial hits at home -- like audiences elsewhere, Indian moviegoers preferred films that allowed them to forget the grimy realities of everyday life -- Mr. Ray's portraits of change in modern India were marked by eloquence, compassion and a simple humanity that won worldwide recognition for his art. Last month, he received an honorary Academy Award for lifetime achievement.
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 9, 1992
Ram Chandra Biswas is no accidental tourist.Ten years ago, he saw a world threatened with nuclear annihilation and decided to act."I promised God I would sacrifice my life to world peace," Mr. Biswas said. To fulfill that vow, he climbed on his bicycle April 21, 1982, and vowed not to stop until he traveled the world, spreading a message of God's love.The 35-year-old native of Calcutta, India, who has been employed as a textile worker, journalist and painter, arrived in Baltimore on Sunday.
FEATURES
September 5, 2007
Sept. 5 1957 The novel On the Road, by Jack Kerouac, was first published by Viking Press. 1997 Mother Teresa died in Calcutta, India, at age 87.
NEWS
By Indira A. R. Lakshmanan and Indira A. R. Lakshmanan,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1997
CALCUTTA, India -- Shona Bose's parents gave her all the freedoms afforded to progressive, upper-middle-class Indian youngsters of the 1990s. She attended a coeducational college, was encouraged to get a job with a foreign bank here, went to discos with friends and was told that she could marry whomever she fell in love with.But when the time came to settle down, Bose -- like most other Westernized young urban professionals -- chose the tradition forced upon her elders: arranged marriage.
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