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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Three years ago, no student at Milford Mill Academy passed the Advanced Placement calculus exam, which made it clear that unprepared students were being pushed into the high-level class. In an attempt to change that, a dozen high school students who have signed up for AP calculus at the Baltimore County school are honing their math skills at a boot camp this week and next. And they'll get extra help on Saturdays during the school year. Tekiah Hanks, a 16-year-old who might have been picking fruit or sleeping late on Thursday morning, said she has no regrets about the summer hours she has committed to solving math problems.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Three years ago, no student at Milford Mill Academy passed the Advanced Placement calculus exam, which made it clear that unprepared students were being pushed into the high-level class. In an attempt to change that, a dozen high school students who have signed up for AP calculus at the Baltimore County school are honing their math skills at a boot camp this week and next. And they'll get extra help on Saturdays during the school year. Tekiah Hanks, a 16-year-old who might have been picking fruit or sleeping late on Thursday morning, said she has no regrets about the summer hours she has committed to solving math problems.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 9, 1990
WEST CHESTER, Pa. -- "People think of me as a nerd -- or a fanatic," says Remo Ciccone, 39, a teacher of calculus at Henderson Senior High School in West Chester, where he puts in an average of 70 hours a week.Having trouble with an equation or theorem? See Mr. Ciccone after school. Got a football practice or band rehearsal after school? No sweat. Drop by after your commitment or on your lunch hour or during study hall. The connoisseur of calc is always there, haunting the classrooms and hallways in a manner that suggests to students that they can run, but they can't hide.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
There's plenty that distinguishes Ravens rookie offensive lineman John Urschel from his teammates, including his prodigious academic career and potential in the field of mathematics. But what I couldn't fit into Sunday's story was the fact that, with all of his football and academic responsibilities, Urschel taught two classes at Penn State - and did it well, by all accounts. Urschel said it's not typical for master's students to teach at Penn State - that responsibility typically goes to doctoral students.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
Ian Cohen was in his office the other day dressed in a shirt open at the collar and with no tie. It was not his typical Polytechnic Institute attire, nor should it have been. Cohen's office showed all the signs of a man packing his things and moving on. Today, Cohen will retire after nine years as principal of the school its devotees and alumni consider the best in the city. "It kind of makes me sad," said assistant principal Samuel Brown, who has been at the school since 1967 and has served under nine principals.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2002
MARYLAND'S Outstanding High School Mathematics Teacher for 2002 is lifelong Brooklyn Park resident Timothy Myers. Myers is a four-year veteran at Baltimore's Western High School, where he teaches calculus I and II and advanced placement calculus. The teacher said that he remembers being interested in mathematics as a young child and continues to be fascinated by it. "Mathematics for me is very beautiful; to see how all the pieces fit together. It's an art form and an opportunity for great creativity and discovery, and it's highly pragmatic at the same time," he said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Maryland State Board of Education took steps Tuesday to amend the new requirement that students take four years of math during high school. In 2013, the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring students to take a math class for each year they are in high school, beginning with those entering as freshmen in the fall of 2014. However, a small percentage of students — about 2.5 percent statewide — take five years to graduate. Those on the five-year graduation track won't have to take a fifth year of math, the state board decided on Tuesday when it voted to publish a new regulation.
NEWS
By Rick Todhunter and Rick Todhunter,States News Service | June 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Calling on America's youth to "aim for the top," U.S. Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander honored five of Maryland's best and brightest students and their teachers yesterday with a luncheon at the Marriott Hotel.Then today at the White House, President Bush was presenting 141 Presidential scholars, including three scholars from Towson High School and one each from the Baltimore School for the Arts and Frederick's Linganore High School, with a medal, a handshake and $1,000 from the Geraldine Dodge Foundation of New Jersey.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Students applying to state universities would have to take a fourth math course and take math during their senior year of high school under revised requirements to be considered this week by the university system's Board of Regents. Math skills atrophy in students who don't take a course their senior year, and those students are more likely to need costly remediation in college, said Chancellor William E. Kirwan, a strong proponent of the tougher application requirements. "Math is not a spectator sport," said Kirwan, a one-time math professor.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | January 14, 1994
Keys to unlock mind-boggling mathematical mysteries can be found down the hall and around a corner in Room 269 at South Carroll High School.Mondays through Fridays, from 2:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., puzzling problems in algebra, geometry and calculus are solved by the students who visit the school's math lab. Master mathematician and teacher Jim Torretti runs the lab. He provides the expertise that turns students' questions and extra effort into scholarly success.Mr....
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Maryland State Board of Education took steps Tuesday to amend the new requirement that students take four years of math during high school. In 2013, the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring students to take a math class for each year they are in high school, beginning with those entering as freshmen in the fall of 2014. However, a small percentage of students — about 2.5 percent statewide — take five years to graduate. Those on the five-year graduation track won't have to take a fifth year of math, the state board decided on Tuesday when it voted to publish a new regulation.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
While I appreciate letter writer Linda Jacobs' position regarding Advanced Placement courses, for her to call them foolishness is excessive and lacks any appreciation of what the purpose of an AP course is ( "AP courses don't equal education," Jan. 22). The purpose of an AP course is to prepare a student for an AP exam. However, you don't have to take an AP course to take that exam, although it is recommended. Different colleges have different standards for accepting AP credits.
NEWS
By Brendan J. Doherty | December 13, 2012
In the aftermath of President Barack Obama's near-sweep of the critical Electoral College swing states last month, post-election analysis of the keys to his decisive victory has paid scant attention to one important factor: Mr. Obama's disproportionate focus on swing states began soon after his inauguration and continued throughout his term in office. We expect presidential candidates to target swing states as an election draws near. Since 48 of the 50 states allocate their Electoral College votes on a winner-take-all basis, campaigns focus their scarce resources on states where the outcome is in doubt.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Malcolm Taylor never took any math classes in high school. But the vocational high school graduate, now 77, took more than half a dozen classes taught by Paul Miller at what is now Baltimore City Community College, beginning with a basic, noncredit math course. "I believe Mr. Miller was the teacher that had the greatest impact on me and what I chose to do. He was the one who had the greatest impact on the trajectory of my life," said Taylor, who has worked as a math professor and statistician for the U.S. military.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Students applying to state universities would have to take a fourth math course and take math during their senior year of high school under revised requirements to be considered this week by the university system's Board of Regents. Math skills atrophy in students who don't take a course their senior year, and those students are more likely to need costly remediation in college, said Chancellor William E. Kirwan, a strong proponent of the tougher application requirements. "Math is not a spectator sport," said Kirwan, a one-time math professor.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Gen. David Petraeus likes to talk about battlefield geometry. It's his turn of phrase for describing troop deployments in Iraq. The mathematical configuration is changing again, the size of U.S. ground forces shifting once more. But it's not soon enough for many American soldiers whose tours have left them scarred in ways seen and unseen and their families struggling to cope against tough odds. A reduction in combat tours from 15 to 12 months was announced last week, as a gesture to replenish military readiness.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | June 15, 1992
George Appleby will grade calculus exams in South Carolina.Ken Katzen will repair homes in Kentucky.Patricia Neidhardt will plant marsh grass on Wye Island.Sister Mary Anne Smith will turn Spanish words into English ones -- and vice versa -- in Jamaica.Robert Green will be back in uniform.And Ken Rockelein will be on the phone, soliciting money for the Special Olympics.How do teachers spend their summer vacations? Count the ways. They are many.Although people with 12-month jobs may think that teachers while away their summers, "almost none of them do," says Mr. Rockelein, who teaches biology at Chinquapin Middle School in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | June 15, 1992
George Appleby will grade calculus exams in South Carolina.Ken Katzen will repair homes in Kentucky.Patricia Neidhardt will plant marsh grass on Wye Island.Sister Mary Anne Smith will turn Spanish words into English ones -- and vice versa -- in Jamaica.Robert Green will be back in uniform.And Ken Rockelein will be on the phone, soliciting money for the Special Olympics.How do teachers spend their summer vacations? Count the ways. They are many.Although people with 12-month jobs may think that teachers while away their summers, "almost none of them do," says Mr. Rockelein, who teaches biology at Chinquapin Middle School in Baltimore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
Charles G. Trautwein Sr., a retired oil burner mechanic and collector who saved all of his pay envelopes during his 60 working years, died of sepsis April 18 at Genesis Health Care Hamilton Center. He was 97 and spent nearly his entire life in Lauraville. He was born in a family farmhouse on Ailsa Avenue in what was then Baltimore County and is now a Northeast Baltimore neighborhood. His grandfather, German immigrant George Sack, had a farm, as well as a hardware and lumber business. The family once owned more than 50 acres near Cold Spring Lane and Harford Road, and as a young man, Mr. Trautwein watched as streets were cut through the family land and houses built.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
Ian Cohen was in his office the other day dressed in a shirt open at the collar and with no tie. It was not his typical Polytechnic Institute attire, nor should it have been. Cohen's office showed all the signs of a man packing his things and moving on. Today, Cohen will retire after nine years as principal of the school its devotees and alumni consider the best in the city. "It kind of makes me sad," said assistant principal Samuel Brown, who has been at the school since 1967 and has served under nine principals.
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