Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCalculators
IN THE NEWS

Calculators

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 25, 2004
Several Web sites have online calculators that can help a prospective homebuyer figure out the rate that can be expected and the amount of monthly mortgage payments. Here are a few: Bankrate.com www.bankrate.com/brm/calculators/mortgages.asp Features mortgage and amortization calculators. Relator.com www.homefair.com/homefair/usr/qualcalcform.html Determine the loan amount you can qualify for by income, savings and rate. HSH Associates, Financial Publishers www.hsh.com/calc-howmuch.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If historic tax bills are wrong in the future, at least city property owners will know who to blame. The City Council voted unanimously Monday to give Baltimore's government authority to do the appraisals that determine the size of historic tax credits - essentially stripping state officials of the duty in response to errors that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The plan, which is expected to get final approval next week, ends months of finger-pointing between state and city officials over who is to blame for the problems.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Toni Y. Joseph and Toni Y. Joseph,Dallas Morning News | March 16, 1992
DALLAS -- If you have a business degree and wish it would earn you a Rolls-Royce, your taste in head-turning machines is passe. For a real status symbol, try sliding an HP out of your briefcase.HP is tech-talk for Hewlett-Packard calculators. And in the dress-for-success world of high finance, says Dallas CPA Warren Howell, HPs are as hip as red suspenders, Polo sunglasses, Mont Blanc pens and the Wall Street Journal."I know several people who just carry them around," Mr. Howell says. "They have to carry something because they can't add or subtract, so they carry an HP, because it looks more prestigious."
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
City officials want to hire their own assessors to determine the size of historic tax credits in response to errors blamed on the state that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The proposal is the latest step by the Rawlings-Blake administration to resolve problems in the calculation of the tax credits for improvement to historic properties. The calculations were sometimes wrong, and some property owners wound up owing thousands of dollars more in taxes than they anticipated.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
Calculators, a no-no in classrooms a few decades ago, are everywhere these days, with supporters saying the small hand-held devices have helped revolutionize math education.Since the mid-1980s, when calculators began to be commonly used in Maryland, sales have skyrocketed (one of the top four manufacturers, Texas Instruments, reported a doubling of sales revenue over the past six years, to $447 million) and Baltimore-area students -- letting calculators do the dirty work of arithmetic -- have scaled new mathematical heights.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
Baltimore schools are buying thousands of calculators, rulers, protractors, compasses and other materials -- at an estimated cost of $211,352.43 -- to stock classrooms for a new battery of state tests that start May 13.Some suburban counties are making similar purchases in preparation for the tests, which anxiously are awaited by teachers and administrators alike.The materials are required or recommended for the tests, which are far different in format from the multiple-choice tests students usually take.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Fifty years ago this week, Army Maj. Gen. Gladeon Barnes pushed a button in Philadelphia and turned on an incredibly bulky, maddeningly slow and absurdly unreliable machine that would change the world.It was called ENIAC. It was the world's first electronic computer.While there are challengers for the title of "first computer," the dedication of ENIAC on Feb. 15, 1946, is widely accepted as the day the Information Age began. And like the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia 170 years before, it declared a revolution.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Kauffman and Matthew Kauffman,The Hartford Courant | January 11, 2004
The future of Social Security remains one of the great unknowns in retirement planning. But at least it is easy to get a handle on how fat or thin your check would be under today's laws. The Social Security Administration's Web site (www.ssa.gov/planners/calculators.htm) offers two interactive calculators. One asks for just two numbers - your current income and age - before spitting out ballpark monthly benefits estimates for early, regular or delayed retirement, as well as estimated disability and survivor's benefits.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2004
Hate financial planning? Then it will be easy to remember the address of this Web site - www.ihatefinancialplanning. com. Here you'll find the resources - and the motivation - you need to get ready for the rest of your financial life. Of course, there's the usual collection of calculators telling you, say, how much your 401(k) might be worth someday or how long it will take to pay off your credit cards. But there's much more here to tickle your interest: such as articles on how to create a personal written financial plan, how to determine your risk tolerance, how to find a professional financial planner, even how to pump up your savings.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
Ignoring efforts to stop carnage on city's streets The Sun's editorial about Baltimore's high murder count incorrectly wrote: "There is virtual silence among other city officials on this subject. No council member, no state senator, no member of the House of Delegates and few ministers dare to speak forcefully against the carnage that robs Baltimore of human potential and quality of life" ("Murder's toll," Sept. 13). This statement was a direct slap in the face to me, and to the many other city officials and ministers who have long toiled to get at the root of the problems that plague our city.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 22, 2013
The GOP's attempt to de-fund the "Affordable Care Act" (aka "Obamacare") is somewhat complicated, but I will attempt to bring it together for you. We begin with the fact of universal Republican opposition to the law. Not one Republican supported Obamacare's original passage. And generally negative reviews by a nervous public since that time have only encouraged continuing attempts to slow down its implementation. At the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue, the Obama administration has been quite liberal with waivers, exceptions and delayed effective dates but strongly opposed to any (friendly or unfriendly)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Remember that card in Monopoly, "Bank error in your favor, collect $200?" With the top-hatted rich guy jumping in surprise and glee as the teller hands him the bills? In Baltimore, it's more like, "Tax assessment error in your favor, keep the $1.5 million. " Because after all, it's not like the city is hurting for revenue. As Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert reported in The Sun this week, the city has decided to let bygones be bygones when it comes to the tax breaks mistakenly given to some commercial property owners.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Baltimore County business owners are criticizing the way the county has imposed its new stormwater management fee, saying officials miscalculated the amount of hard surface on their properties. The complaints came as a county official acknowledged that the technology used to measure properties cannot tell the difference between surfaces that are impervious and those that are not. The county used digitalized aerial photography from 2011 to measure building footprints and hard surfaces, said Vince Gardina, head of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegis | April 22, 2013
Area high school math students applied their recently learned skills today while getting a taste of military life courtesy of Maryland Army National Guard Soldiers from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade and the 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment. Ho Chang, a mathematics teacher at Edgewood High School and a former Army air defense artillery officer, brought 60 of his juniors and seniors out to Lauderick Creek Training Site and the nearby Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground to examine vehicle displays of trucks and helicopters and participate in a land navigation course, seeing first-hand how math permeates all aspects of even military life.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
In the six months that have passed since Margaret Fulcher received her most recent homeowners insurance policy, she has moved on from being shocked to simply incensed. The premium to fully insure her Baltimore rowhouse increased fourfold last year — to a sum she can ill afford and one that she thinks does not accurately represent the cost of replacing her home. "This is a case of homeowners insurance underwater," said Fulcher, comparing her premium to a mortgage that is worth more than the home to which it is attached.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
As I read the two recent articles in the Sun about terrible upheaval in Iraq ("More violence feared in Iraq as 3 blasts kill 9," Aug. 16, and "Bombings, shootings kill about 70 across Iraq," Aug. 17), my saddened Naval veteran's heart beat out the thought that the U.S. citizens should again be reminded of President Barack Obama's self-centered political ploy as he withdrew our troops from Iraq at the end of 2011. Unfortunately, now without the troops' assistance and protection, Iraq soon became a center of civil strife and therefore was unable to develop into the first democracy in the Arab Middle East, which indeed would have served as an example for the other surrounding turbulent nations, and it also eliminated Iraq as a base for the U.S. and allied forces from which they could have operated more efficiently in the protection of our interests and responsibilities in controlling, and hopefully eliminating, the radical terrorists, includingal-Qaidaand the Taliban, who have openly declared many times that their main objective in life was to annihilate every freedom loving individual from the face of the earth.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun columnist | February 11, 2007
After a New York Times article last month suggested we might be saving too much for retirement, it wasn't long before Bethesda financial planner Mary Malgoire started hearing from clients that "The New York Times says I don't have to save." Malgoire, solidly in the prevailing camp that says Americans aren't preparing enough for retirement, wasn't happy. "It made me angry," she says of the article. "Americans generally are not saving enough. Baby boomers are overspending hand over fist."
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe | August 19, 2001
IF YOU'RE like most investors, you're not getting much from your fund companies these days. That may be because all you are asking for is big profits, something mighty hard to deliver in current market conditions. One thing you might want to ask for is your fund family's free educational materials, the kind of thing firms produce to develop savvy shareholders. Much of my summer has been dedicated to reviewing 377 educational pamphlets and brochures from 34 fund families (thank goodness more didn't respond to my request for information)
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Give credit to the Orioles for getting the most bang for their buck out of Wednesday night's announcement that the club is purchasing the contract of top position player prospect Manny Machado. The Orioles made the announcement late Wednesday night -- a press release was sent at 11:24 p.m. -- allowing the news to get into final editions of newspapers as well as quickly filter through the internet. Those who didn't hear the news Wednesday night woke up to it Thursday morning. One industry source said the Orioles considered holding the announcement until Thursday afternoon, but decided otherwise, hoping an early release would create buzz throughout the day and spike walk-up ticket sales for Thursday's series opener against the Royals in anticipation of Machado's first big league start.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Few people, from politicians to commenters on Facebook, expressed surprise when The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the city's population has continued on a downward trajectory. Some did wonder, though, whether the minuscule number of people lost was worth reporting and how the U.S. Census Bureau arrived at its estimates. Baltimore's loss was teensy. Only 0.2 percent of Charm City's population - 1,500 people - departed in the 15-month period following the April 2010 Census, according to the Census Bureau's first city population estimates of the decade.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.