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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Raw or steamed, squid has little appeal to us. But bread and fry it, and we're big fans. We ordered fried calamari from four area restaurants. Here's what turned up. Mezze 1606 Thames St., Baltimore -- 410-563-7600 Hours --5 p.m.-11 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --11 minutes Presentation beat out substance with this order, $9.40. With pecorino cheese, garlic sauce, chopped tomatoes and lettuce, it looked the prettiest. But there was only about half as much calamari as in the other orders.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
When it comes to restaurants, never underestimate the role of location. For Plates, a casual American eatery located in the Downtown Athletic Club and surrounded by midtown office buildings, the location means a busy lunch but not much of a dinner rush. Sometimes the best time to visit a restaurant is in its off hours. At Plates, we found good service, well-executed, familiar food and a quiet - though sometimes slightly odd - atmosphere, right in the center of the city.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
Angela B. Calamari grew up in a cold-water flat in a tough neighborhood in Brooklyn, N. Y., and started her career as a social worker.So when the Ellicott City teacher began to work with a Baltimore City church's social service outreach center two years ago, she knew twoimportant things.She knew the problems of poverty in the city and she knew not to go in as Lady Bountiful tossing coins from her carriage to the poor."One of the things I think is particularly characteristic of Angela is that outgoing personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Regi's is a place I like to recommend when someone ask me for an all-purpose, no-frills restaurants, especially when there is the challenge of accommodating difficult friends or relatives — "He only eats meat and potatoes, and she gets nervous within a yard of a salt shaker. " Constructed out of two adjoining Federal Hill townhouses, Regi's opened in 1978 as part of the original Federal Hill dining boom, and it's managed to outlast not only all of that original class — well-remembered places like Sisson's and Bandaloops — but many of the succeeding restaurants, too. Regi's was on my list of Baltimore's 50 Best Restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Samos doesn't take reservations, doesn't take credit cards and doesn't have a liquor license. Yet it does have plenty of customers. What pulls people into this small, family-run operation is the food. The kitchen, supervised by chef and owner Nicholas Georgalas, dishes up zesty Greek fare in portions that would feed an All-American football player. The dozen or so tables split between two dining rooms, one offering a view of the open kitchen, are usually full — occupied by priests, workmen, staff members from nearby Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and extended families.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 15, 2006
Chicagoans have eaten oceans of squid since the growth in popularity of fried calamari. And who can blame us, because the lightly breaded calamari are delicious - whether dipped in a zesty tomato sauce or garlicky aioli or on their own. But I'll wager that only a few of us have eaten squid prepared in other ways, whether sauteed, grilled, braised or stuffed and baked. It's too bad; squid are delicious and beloved in Mediterranean and Asian cuisines. They're also rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Don't let squeamishness put you off from trying a squid recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 11, 1991
It has been Mobtown and Crabtown and Charm City. And, for a while, Baltimore was Nickel City. This was early in the 20th century, when a nickel actually bought something: a sandwich, a beer, a taxi dance or a trolley ride. When the buffalo nickel was introduced in 1913, Baltimoreans used more of them than anyone else in the country.This history lesson comes courtesy of the new Nickel City Grill in Harborplace. The owner and chef are Sunbelters, but their place pays tribute to our town's history; the deco design, which uses lots of dark wood and features sleek booths that resemble railroad dining cars, recalls Baltimore's former reputation as an industrial and transportation center, and the menu updates the region's famed seafood, chicken and ribs.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 10, 1994
Aegean, 4901 Eastern Ave., (410) 633-0100. Major credit cards accepted. Open for lunch and dinner Tuesdays to Sundays. No-smoking area: yes. Prices: appetizers, $3.95- $15.95; entrees, $7.95-$19.95. ***One of my guests ordered calamari at the Aegean. From the name and the location (where the Mediterranean used to be), he had been expecting a Greek restaurant, and he always orders calamari at Greek restaurants. Never mind that a specialty of the house is rack of lamb en croute. Never mind that you can get a New York strip forestiere here, or veal piccata Romana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
THE importance of truly good fried calamari, like they serve at Fazzini's Italian Kitchen in Cockeysville, never should be underestimated. Here's a classic example of why. A friend once was up for a very big job at New York's Daily News. The interview rolled over into lunch in an Italian restaurant, and calamari was ordered. The friend had never had calamari before but did not want to advertise this for fear of appearing too unworldly to work in New York. So, he plunged in and managed to retrieve the rubberiest example of fried squid ever prepared.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | March 11, 1999
Even if you're unfamiliar with Thai cuisine, you'll have no problem with the menu at Thai Classic. It's full of color photos of the most popular appetizers and entrees.Owner Surachai Vongvighat thought that would be helpful to customers when he opened the restaurant two years ago in a small strip shopping center in Eldersburg.The storefront restaurant is done in peach with dark green trim. The tablecloths are also dark green. There are framed photos of Thai royalty on the walls and a single fresh rose on each table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Samos doesn't take reservations, doesn't take credit cards and doesn't have a liquor license. Yet it does have plenty of customers. What pulls people into this small, family-run operation is the food. The kitchen, supervised by chef and owner Nicholas Georgalas, dishes up zesty Greek fare in portions that would feed an All-American football player. The dozen or so tables split between two dining rooms, one offering a view of the open kitchen, are usually full — occupied by priests, workmen, staff members from nearby Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and extended families.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
I'm biased. I make no pretense to the contrary. Maisy's, 313 N. Charles St., is my favorite go-to lunch stop within reasonable walking distance from my downtown Baltimore office. The menu has never disappointed in quality and care. There've been days when I thought the service a bit relaxed, but then they've never seemed busy enough to get the staff adrenal glands really pumping. Nevertheless, much as I love Maisy's, it's not the very first place I'd send someone who's in a hurry. With that in mind, I deliberately put the screws to Maisy's to see how they'd fare in a luncheon time trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2010
Portalli's is a pretty lovable Italian restaurant in the Ellicott City location where Jordan's Steakhouse was. I like very much that the folks who opened it have stated their intentions clearly on the restaurant's Web page: "The goal was to create a restaurant that has as much appeal for families looking for a night on the town as it does for the most critical foodies, and the end result is a restaurant everybody can enjoy." Even better, I like that they had a plan in the first place. Do they achieve that goal at every moment and with every dish?
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Some restaurants, you feel, will succeed simply because of the force of the owner's personality. In the case of Umi Sake, the new sushi restaurant in Cockeysville where Pacific Rim used to be, I imagine people will go just because the owner, Lisa Lee, is such a positive presence in the dining room. Lee used to own Johnny's Sushi in Timonium, named after her brother the chef. She sold the place and had a baby. Three years later when Pacific Rim in Cockeysville closed, the landlord called her to see if she'd be interested in being a restaurateur again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2008
Fins on the Square takes over the old Rick's Cafe Americain space on Canton Square from Granite Bar and Grille, which tried to make it with a (tired) industrial theme, a concept that lasted less than two years. Fins, under the same ownership, is going with a beach club theme - it looks like a Jimmy Buffett concert exploded in there. It's just as random, but seems like a much better fit for the neighborhood. There was a lively happy-hour crowd at the bar when we visited on a weeknight, and Fins was feeling less like a fourth-choice-on-the-square place than Granite ever did. The airy interior space is evenly divided between the entrance-side bar and the dining room, and on a recent late-summer evening, the large front windows on both sides were open to the breeze.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Raw or steamed, squid has little appeal to us. But bread and fry it, and we're big fans. We ordered fried calamari from four area restaurants. Here's what turned up. Mezze 1606 Thames St., Baltimore -- 410-563-7600 Hours --5 p.m.-11 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --11 minutes Presentation beat out substance with this order, $9.40. With pecorino cheese, garlic sauce, chopped tomatoes and lettuce, it looked the prettiest. But there was only about half as much calamari as in the other orders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams | January 24, 1992
In my experience, quail usually turns up on the menus of places that are either French and pricey, or quite proud of their game dishes. And, of course, pricey.But the last place I spotted quail on a menu was neither of these. The two quail in question, grilled over a charcoal fire and served with plump, oregano-dusted french fries, are available at a charming little place in the heart of Greektown -- and they cost $7.25.I had passed Zorba's on a couple of occasions, and it definitely looked worthy of investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 21, 1995
Given the amount of money that must have been poured into building the harbor's newest restaurant, Victor's Cafe is startlingly under-publicized.Hardly anyone seems to know about Victor's, and that's too bad. I want it to hold on until spring, when its upper and lower decks will offer some of Baltimore's best waterside tables. It hardly matters how the food is when you've got a view like Victor's. But as a matter of fact, the food is quite decent.You'd think Victor's would be packing 'em in. All the hottest trends are represented here: A menu with plenty of choices under $15. Straightforward grilled food with Mediterranean and Southwestern touches.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 15, 2006
Chicagoans have eaten oceans of squid since the growth in popularity of fried calamari. And who can blame us, because the lightly breaded calamari are delicious - whether dipped in a zesty tomato sauce or garlicky aioli or on their own. But I'll wager that only a few of us have eaten squid prepared in other ways, whether sauteed, grilled, braised or stuffed and baked. It's too bad; squid are delicious and beloved in Mediterranean and Asian cuisines. They're also rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Don't let squeamishness put you off from trying a squid recipe.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 7, 2005
If you've ever been charmed by some of the names of the streets in the Columbia/Laurel area, you're sure to be smitten with that Maryland community's latest eatery. That's because the name - Fire Rock Grill - is actually borrowed from one of those streets. According to restaurant manager Greg Sanders, the owners of the restaurant were neighbors on Laurel's Fire Rock Road. Sanders says Nish Patel and Vahn Ennis talked for years about opening a restaurant together. This week, that fantasy becomes reality.
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