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NEWS
February 4, 1995
The Middle East summit in Cairo Thursday was as splendid in symbolism as it was meager in substance. It would be hard to say which is more important.In one sense, this was the first Middle East summit ever. That is, the first in which Israel's prime minister sat down with his regional counterparts, not just one-on-one; the first in which the others congregated as Middle East rather than exclusively Arab leaders.It began with the prime minister of Israel, the president of Egypt, the king of Jordan and the head of the Palestinian authority sitting down for the festive meal ending the daytime fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, a traditional hour of sharing with family and close friends.
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NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | July 21, 2013
From the start, it was a world-class piece of political theater. The recent massive demonstrations involving millions of Egyptians are said to have persuaded the Egyptian military to throw President Mohammed Morsi out of office. Actually, however, military and opposition leaders along with government and business officials appear to have planned all of it in advance. What better evidence could there be than the sudden, overnight resolution of several major problems that infuriated millions of Egyptians, prompting them to demonstrate?
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NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy and Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy,Los Angeles Times | February 23, 2009
CAIRO -A bomb exploded yesterday in a bazaar near the historic Hussein mosque in Cairo, killing a French woman, wounding 18 others and raising fears that Islamic militants might be targeting Egypt's tourism industry after several years of relative quiet. The blast was small, but it reverberated through the tight alleys of the centuries-old Khan El-Khalili bazaar and sent shopkeepers, coffee shop waiters, worshipers and tourists scrambling for cover. Egyptian state-owned TV reported that a French tourist was killed and the other victims, mostly foreigners, were injured when two masked women tossed a bomb from the roof of a motel just after dusk.
FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | May 23, 2013
What it is: A travel app designed for kids ages 3 to 7 that allows them to pack their bags and enjoy the travel season by exploring worldwide destinations like London, Cairo and Moscow.  After kids learn how to pack a suitcase according to weather, they drive to the airport, navigate security lines and board their flight.   Little travelers claim their luggage and are off to see the world! After a busy day of sightseeing, kids can snap a few photos and create a postcard to send back home.  Why it's fun: The perfect app for a kid to play leading up to a summer vacation, Frequent Flyer builds anticipation of traveling while giving parents an opportunity to prepare and a context in which to share their own travel experiences.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
CAIRO -- Necessary accessories for every tourist in Egypt:* A money dispenser so the merchants who flock around you can help themselves. Why bother rooting through your wallet each time when they can do it for you?* A baseball cap with two flashing signs that can be illuminated at the wearer's choice: "Tourist Open for Business" or "Tourist Closed Now, Try Again Later."Every first-time tourist in Egypt must run the gamut of entrepreneurs with an outstretched hand. The requirement apparently is stamped in your passport in some invisible ink.There is Ahmed, owner of the camel-of-a-thousand-pictures who will hoist you upon a humpy back for a souvenir photo in front of the Pyramids.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 27, 1995
CAIRO, Egypt -- Ambushers with machine guns raked an armored car carrying Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Ethiopia yesterday, but he was not hurt and hurried back to Cairo.Mr. Mubarak promptly blamed the attack on Muslim radicals who assassinated his predecessor and are trying to overthrow his 14-year-old regime.Two of the alleged attackers and two Ethiopian security officers were killed in the gunfight that erupted as Mr. Mubarak's motorcade drove from the airport into Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, for a meeting of African leaders.
NEWS
By Norman Kempster and Norman Kempster,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1991
CAIRO -- Seemingly confident but increasingly reticent, Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in the Middle East yesterday to try to soothe Arab and Israeli anxiety over conditions for a peace conference.During Mr. Baker's 12-hour flight from Washington to Cairo, the State Department announced that he would confer Friday with Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin.There is nothing unusual about that: Mr. Baker has met 12 times this year with Mr. Pankin or his predecessor, Alexander A. Bessmertnykh.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
CAIRO, Egypt -- Suspected Muslim radicals answered the Egyptian government's crackdown on terrorism with a bold assassination attempt yesterday that killed four people and wounded 15, including their target, a top minister.A bomb strapped to a parked motorcycle exploded near the city's main Tahrir Square just as a motorcade passed carrying Hassan el-Alfy, the minister of interior. He is in charge of combating the 19-month wave of attacks by Islamic fundamentalists.Mr. el-Alfy was wounded in the arm and later appeared on national television from his hospital bed to denounce the attackers as "killers and butchers who have no religion."
FEATURES
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 7, 1995
Cairo, Egypt -- Slick leans over the green baize, squinting at the six ball for an easy shot to the corner pocket. He jabs smartly with his cue . . . and the ball careens four inches from the corner.Specs is next. Another simple shot, a virtual gimmie. His ball, too, spins wildly off mark.Finally Muscles sinks a ball. His buddies snap their fingers -- Egyptian cool for applause.Egypt's latest craze is pool, but the spiraling popularity of the game is no reflection of the skill with which it is played.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Joseph A. Dabbah, a well-known former Baltimore watchmaker who kept his customers' wristwatches, pocket watches and decorative clocks on time and ticking for nearly half a century, died July 18 in his sleep at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 88. Mr. Dabbah, who had lived for more than 30 years in the Milbrook neighborhood near Pikesville, was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt. "He was 15 when his father died, and suddenly he was the man of the house. He was the oldest and had to help his mother with the other children," said his daughter, Claudette Jacobs, a registered nurse-educator at Howard County General Hospital who lives in Dayton.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
The images shown on the news media are startling: violence rages on the streets of Cairo while a divided government continues to sow seeds of discord. I have spent some time in Tahrir Square this past week and have seen a very different perspective. I saw no violence, I saw no despair. Instead, I saw a people reclaiming their unique voice for democracy. The situation in Egypt is tense, but the future is bright. What started as a political power grab by President Mohamed Morsi in the shadow of his success ending the Gaza conflict turned into chaos on the streets as rival protesters from opposition groups and government supporters voiced their differing visions for the future of Egypt.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | November 23, 2012
The chameleon is finally showing his true colors. Since taking office in June, Mohamed Morsi, Egypt's not-so-new president, has been equivocating, trying to balance Egypt's longstanding diplomatic and financial relationship with the West with his true self: a Muslim Brotherhood fundamentalist who is contemptuous of the West, hates Israel and wants to turn Egypt into a fully Islamic state. "He speaks of moderation for the West," Perihan Abou-Zeid, a 28-year-old Egyptian officer for a media-production company in Cairo, told me. "But then when Salafists blow up churches, there are no arrest warrants.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: FUSTIAN If you come across a piece of writing that is so over-the-top, so bombastic, so pompous and pretentious that it seems more like upholstery than writing, there's a label you can pin on it: fustian (pronounced FUST-yun or FUSS-chen). Fustian was originally a coarse cloth, later a higher-grade twill.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
The high hopes of the Egyptian people for a peaceful transition to democracy are being thwarted by the brutal tactics of the country's military rulers, who in recent days have launched a bloody campaign of repression against protesters demanding an immediate turnover of power to an elected civilian government. The armed forces, once revered as guardians of the popular uprising that overthrew longtime dictator Hosni Mubarak in February, now appear desperate to cling to power at any cost.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Matthew VanDyke — the Baltimore writer and filmmaker who was jailed in Libya for nearly six months and then remained to aid rebels seeking to overthrow dictator Moammar Gadhafi — is scheduled to return home Saturday. VanDyke, 32, is set to arrive about 7 p.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, said his mother, Sharon VanDyke. He will leave Cairo on Saturday morning and fly to John F. Kennedy International Airport before coming to Baltimore, she said.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
Their voices have been heard. The people have spoken. The streets of Cairo echo with the clatter of democracy and freedom. However, I wonder if freedom in Egypt is truly possible. Can a regime torn by controversy and dictatorship follow with freedom and liberty? Many Americans tend to view Muslim countries with a cautious eye. However, this past weekend I stumbled upon a very peculiar image. The image depicted was thousands of men and women praying together side-by-side after the conclusion of dictatorship in Tahrir Square in Cairo (a feat typically unusual outside of the holy city of Mecca)
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Ashraf Khalil,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1999
CAIRO -- It's known as "the national dream." And that might not be much of an exaggeration. Beneath Egypt's crowded and claustrophobic capital city lies what many feel is the last, best hope to make Cairo livable again.In a city rapidly collapsing under the weight of its own population, government officials and city planners have turned their hopes underground -- to the only subway system in Africa or the Middle East."It's an idea that has been long overdue. They should have started it in the '60s," says Sayed Ettouney, a Cairo University professor of architecture and urban planning.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
As Molotov cocktails, rocks and gunshots filled the streets of Cairo last week, executives at ARINC Inc. in Annapolis fixed on their employees' safety and getting them out of Egypt. The company, which outfitted Cairo's international terminal with electronics systems and maintains U.S. Air Force jets there, decided Thursday after days of anti-government protests and clashes to pull employees, contractors and their families out. It was a harrowing time — there and here. "This is what we've been living and breathing 24/7," said Alice Lao, ARINC'S director of international human resources.
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