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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 15, 2014
Caffeine from coffee, tea, soda or even tablet, has the beneficial effect of enhancing memory, according to a new study led by a former Johns Hopkins University researcher. More research needs to be done, but the findings could be used to help understand how long-term memory works and have an impact on cognitive decline, the researchers said. The researchers said it's long been known that caffeine has a cognitive effect, but they found that it has a particular effect on strengthening memories and making them resistant to forgetting.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The banned amphetamine that will keep Chris Davis off the baseball diamond for 25 games has become a go-to for stressed college students and worn athletes looking for a quick boost of energy. Adderall acts like a "tremendous jolt of caffeine" that some have used to fight through fatigue before a big test or make it through a tough game, said Eric Strain, director at the Johns Hopkins Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research. But the drug is not supposed to be used for that and is only approved to treat a few illnesses, including attention-deficit disorder and the sleeping ailment narcolepsy.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | March 7, 1995
Q: Every time my 16-year-old daughter drinks coffee or sodas, she get bladder spasms and runs to the bathroom constantly. Is there anything we should do about this?A: When we first read your question, the answer seemed obvious: caffeine (found in coffee and some sodas) was the culprit for your daughter's symptoms. In fact, caffeine is specifically mentioned as a bladder irritant in the latest edition of "The New Our Bodies, Ourselves," (written by the Boston Women's Health Book Collective and published by Touchstone/Simon and Schuster)
NEWS
March 3, 2014
I'd like to address some of Michelle Minton's comments directed at the bills aimed to ban energy drinks to minors ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 27). First of all, to say that these bills are "knee jerk legislation based on anecdotal evidence and sensational news headlines" is simply untrue. These drinks not only contain large amounts of caffeine but also contain other ingredients with stimulant properties. Also, let's clarify that the caffeine listed on cans of energy drinks is a food additive.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 30, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration said yesterday it will look into how caffeine in foods and snacks affects children. What spurred this? The FDA didn't say directly, but many people are pointing to a new "Alert Energy" gum by Wrigley that contains caffeine. The addictive ingredient is also showing up in other places, such as trail mix and jelly beans. Health experts have been worried for a while now about the effects of caffeine-packed energy drinks on children and anyone who might have heart issues.
FEATURES
By Betsy Hornick and Betsy Hornick,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 14, 2001
Chances are you're reading this with a cup of coffee, tea or soda within reach. Rest assured, the evidence so far on such caffeine-containing beverages suggests you can take another sip without worry. "When it comes to unexplained health problems, it's easy to point a finger at caffeine, especially since caffeine does have effects on the body," says Dr. Herbert Muncie, a family-practice physician and professor at the University of Maryland. But Muncie agrees with other experts who believe that caffeine's effects do not pose health risks for most people.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | October 13, 2006
Does that cup of decaffeinated coffee give you a jolt? It may, because almost all decaf coffee contains some caffeine, a new University of Florida study shows. The results could have implications for people told to avoid caffeine because of certain medical conditions such as high blood pressure, kidney disease or anxiety disorders, according to the study reported in this month's Journal of Analytical Toxicology. "If someone drinks five to 10 cups of decaffeinated coffee a day, the dose of caffeine could easily reach the level in a cup or two of caffeinated coffee," said co-author Dr. Bruce Goldberger.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
Mark Nicholson considers himself a recovered drug addict of sorts. His addiction? "Coca-Cola," he says. Or more precisely, the caffeine spike in every can. The 51-year-old Idlewylde nurse spent years stashing sodas in his car, in his hospital locker, even by his bed. It was frequently the last thing he drank at night, the first when he awoke. If he didn't get his fix, he paid: "I'd get this humongous headache and feel like I was going to throw up." Nicholson ultimately kicked the caffeine habit with help from a little-known Johns Hopkins Hospital program for people hooked on the drug.
SPORTS
July 6, 1991
Texas Rangers second baseman Julio Franco complained of chest pains before last night's game against the California Angels, but a doctor diagnosed the problem as a caffeine attack, club officials said.Franco, an All-Star reserve, was taken to an Arlington clinic, where team doctor Mike Mycoskie performed chest X-rays and an electrocardiogram. Mycoskie diagnosed the problem as too much caffeine, and Franco was cleared to play. He went 1-for-3.* YANKEES: Farmhand Kevin Mmahat pitched a no-hitter, as the Class AAA Columbus Clippers beat the host Louisville Redbirds, 6-0.Mmahat, a 26-year-old left-hander who underwent rotator cuff surgery during the off-season, struck out nine and walked three to even his record at 3-3.* METS: The club has offered an unprecedented $20 million over 20 years to help with the financing for a new stadium in Norfolk, Va., for the Class AAA Tidewater Tides.
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 14, 1996
Though a depressant, booze can sometimes make you peppy. And caffeine, that elixir of pep, has no power without the brain's help.Those are just a couple of the myth-busters in "Buzz: The Science and Lore of Alcohol and Caffeine," a new book by science journalist Stephen Braun.Some examples: Women get drunk faster than men not because they are smaller or have different body fat composition but because alcohol-destroying enzymes found in the human stomach lining work better in men than in women.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
In response to your recent editorial about the health risks associated with pesticides, I offer the following factual information and thoughts ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 19): It is time to stop spreading a message of fear and instead take a leadership role in educating the public on the safe and effective use of pesticides. The supporters of legislation requiring more stringent monitoring and reporting of pesticide use are scared because they believe that pesticides are dangerous.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 15, 2014
Caffeine from coffee, tea, soda or even tablet, has the beneficial effect of enhancing memory, according to a new study led by a former Johns Hopkins University researcher. More research needs to be done, but the findings could be used to help understand how long-term memory works and have an impact on cognitive decline, the researchers said. The researchers said it's long been known that caffeine has a cognitive effect, but they found that it has a particular effect on strengthening memories and making them resistant to forgetting.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
HopHacks - a 36-hour, sleepless, caffeine-fueled, mad-rush of computer programming - came to an end Sunday with bleary-eyed Johns Hopkins University students unveiling their (mostly) finished inventions ... and then crashing. The creations, computer programs developed using publicly available code, ranged from the high-minded (an app to help connect the homeless to nearby shelters) to the college-minded (an app to find new happy hour deals). There was a database to make DNA sequences easier for geneticists to search; an organizer for those never-read links and news articles emailed by parents; and a Pandora-esque program that generated playlists based on favorite bands.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 30, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration said yesterday it will look into how caffeine in foods and snacks affects children. What spurred this? The FDA didn't say directly, but many people are pointing to a new "Alert Energy" gum by Wrigley that contains caffeine. The addictive ingredient is also showing up in other places, such as trail mix and jelly beans. Health experts have been worried for a while now about the effects of caffeine-packed energy drinks on children and anyone who might have heart issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Dorsey, b | August 9, 2011
She's played in indie horror films, in plenty of tough girl roles, and with multiple theater groups, and she recently “signed a contract in blood” (her words!) with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society. Julia Pickens, 27, has been acting since she was 14 and earned her degree in theater at Towson University. Now, she's taking on the role of Mandi in the play “Asking Questions,” a Baltimore Playwrights Festival production at Fells Point Corner Theater, premiering Friday. Check out this local actress's tastes.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Baltimore City and Howard County said Tuesday that they will fine merchants who refuse to stop selling caffeine-infused alcohol drinks — a move designed to add teeth to state and federal warnings about the popular beverages. The city's ban on Four Loko and similar drinks, which goes into effect after 5 p.m. Thursday, calls for fines of up to $1,000. The county's ban, which goes into effect a day earlier, has staggered fines of up to $500. Peter Beilenson, Howard County's health officer, said county officials believed the ban was necessary because the safety warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and state health officials sent mixed messages.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | May 30, 1995
Coca-Cola Corp. is trying to revive sales of caffeine-free diet Coke by pitching it to the over-40 caffeine generation.It is the first time that Coke has deviated from a formula that celebrates youth to target an older audience. The move, closely watched in the beverage industry, comes as diet colas are under assault from New Age beverages, ice teas and even water.The strategy, kicked off earlier this year, will get its first big test during the important summer selling season."It is a flat product category and cola companies have to find new ways to sell," said New York beverage industry consultant Tom Pirko.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1998
Q. I was so glad to read your recommendation that a bed-wetter avoid caffeine. I had a serious problem with bed-wetting into my early 20s, which ended completely and immediately after I gave up caffeine!While I have never really researched the subject, I have never seen caffeine mentioned in other columns I have read on this topic. I am certain that avoiding caffeine can prevent a great deal of misery for many bed-wetters and only hope this receives more publicity.A. Thanks for your compelling story.
NEWS
November 22, 2010
Faster than you can say, "Irish coffee," the powers-that-be clamped down on the sale of juice-flavored alcoholic drinks infused with caffeine last week. The Food and Drug Administration has labeled the caffeine in drinks like "Four Loko" to be an unsafe additive, and the manufacturer of that particular product has already pledged to stop using it. Rarely has an alcoholic beverage — one that can be fairly easily duplicated by mixing vodka with a typical energy drink and that has been on store shelves for eight years — received such harsh and universal condemnation.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler asked the state's health department Friday to remove all caffeine-infused alcoholic drinks from the state's liquor stores and taverns. "I ask you to exercise your authority … to take all steps available to you to prevent any further distribution or sale of these unsafe, unadulterated, and mislabeled products wherever found in Maryland," Gansler wrote in a letter to John M. Colmers, the state's secretary of health and mental hygiene. The move comes two days after Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot extracted an agreement from the state's alcohol wholesalers and retailers associations to stop selling the drinks, which are marketed as Four Loko and other brands.
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