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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 5, 1993
Q: Should I pay attention to my wife when she says that we should not order Caesar salads in restaurants?A: The easy answer is to tell you that you should always listen to what your wife says. She may not be right on every occasion, but it is true that Caesar salad dressing, made with raw eggs, has been responsible for many outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to contamination of eggs with salmonella bacteria.These bacteria pose no threat when eggs are properly cooked, but salmonella may infect the intestine if you eat foods containing raw or undercooked eggs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Aggio, the serenely pretty new restaurant at Power Plant Live, invites you to take a pleasure cruise through contemporary Italian cuisine. Your captain is Bryan Voltaggio, the genial chef who first gained national exposure as a contestant on "Top Chef. " If Voltaggio is not a name in your household, know that it is in those that follow dining news as entertainment. He is, to put it plainly, a celebrity chef. But don't let that stop you. In culinary circles, Voltaggio is better known for his flagship restaurant Volt, which he opened in 2008 in his hometown of Frederick, and which continues to operate, six summers later, as a modernist dining mecca, the kind of place that diners plan their visits for months in advance.
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By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
When does a Caesar salad stop being a Caesar salad and become something else altogether? Does it happen when you add a grilled chicken breast or a few slices of sirloin? When you add grilled salmon? Or a crab cake? Is it still a Caesar salad if you use Key lime juice instead of lemon juice? Grilled romaine instead of whole romaine leaves? If you use buttermilk, wasabi paste, avocado, tortilla chips, smoked cheddar or chili powder, is it still a Caesar salad? Salad creator Caesar Cardini would say, "No!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Oh, that's right. Cafe Hon is a restaurant. It would have been easy, last year, to mistake Denise Whiting's Hampden establishment for almost anything else. It was only in November, when Whiting announced she was rescinding her controversial "hon" trademark, that the municipal emergency surrounding Cafe Hon subsided. Two months after the TV show "Kitchen Nightmares" gave it a wholesale makeover, Cafe Hon has settled back nicely into its primary business of serving food to customers — lots of them, too. On recent visits spanning several weeks, the Hampden restaurant was full of patrons, many but by no means all of them families with young children.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
The following are three versions of Caesar salad from three great chefs, Julia Child, Bradley Ogden and Marion Cunningham. Ms. Cunningham's recipe was adapted from an article written for the Los Angeles Times.Julia's CaesarServes four to six.From "From Julia Child's Kitchen" (Alfred A. Knopf).2 large, crisp heads romaine lettuce2 large cloves garlicsaltolive oil2 cups unseasoned, homemade croutons (see below)2 eggsfreshly ground black pepperjuice of 1 lemonWorcestershire sauce1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly gratedFor each person, select 6 to 8 whole, unblemished leaves of romaine, each 3 to 7 inches long.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Recently, I discovered a recipe for a grilled Caesar salad created by Vicki and Steve Caparulo, talented cooking teachers and recipe developers. I first heard of this unique version from a friend who swooned as she described the lightly grilled wedges of romaine lettuce brushed with anchovy-scented mayonnaise dressing that she had sampled in one of the couple's cooking classes. As finishing touches, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and freshly ground black pepper were sprinkled over the warm, slightly charred greens.
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By Paula Gallagher and Paula Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 1999
A good Caesar salad seduces the palate with a heady combination of strong flavors and distinct textures -- a tang of lemon, a bite of garlic, creamy dressing, the crunch of lettuce and croutons.The only thing that's hard to love about this classic mix is its price on restaurant menus. It can run as high as $7.95 for two in some upscale dining rooms. "I think that's a holdover from when it was a salad for two made table-side by the waiter," explains Mark Henry, executive chef at the Oregon Grille in Cockeysville.
FEATURES
By Sam Gugino and Sam Gugino,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
For $64,000, what dish (other than green salad and soupe du jour) graces more restaurant menus than any other? Why, Caesar salad, of course. I have no statistics to verify this, just a lot of observation.Twenty years ago, Caesar salad and steak seemed like the most common order in restaurants. Today, the steak -- and the martinis and cigarettes that went with it -- is as rare as a spotted owl. But Caesar salad is as popular as ever, maybe more so.However, while Caesar salad may be the most used restaurant dish, it may also be the most abused.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 4, 1996
To keep entertained on these long winter nights I have been trying egg tricks. It began with a Caesar salad. One of our kids tasted his first Caesar salad at the home of some friends who, in the Maryland tradition, held an open house on New Year's Day. The kid regarded this new dish as among the best foods he had ever eaten. Reacting to the unlikely occasion of a kid's being enthusiastic about salad, we began making Caesar salad for supper.To make Caesar salad you have to break an egg. The first recipe we tried called for breaking the egg and mixing it in with the salad after the egg had been boiled for 60 seconds.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,U.S. Department of Agriculture | December 12, 1991
Fresh from celebrating her roommate's birthday at a cozy Baltimore restaurant, the 20-year-old Loyola College student retired contentedly for the night. The piquant flavor of Caesar salad lingered as a pleasant memory. She drifted into sleep.With a start, she awoke a few hours later with knife-like stomach pains. Then came a cascading series of symptoms: intense vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pains, and alternating fevers and chills that left her too weak to climb stairs without help.After three days of escalating misery, she checked into the hospital, where doctors found her blood pressure dangerously low and her kidneys verging on failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
I always get an earful from readers when I neglect to mention Costas in any roundup  not only of crab houses but of good area restaurants in general. Costas isn't the first restaurant that comes to mind for a Baltimore Summer Restaurant Week option -- for one thing, it's in the county. For another, some folks think it foremost as a crab house. But take a look at the menu. Looks good! And the best part --all entrees are served with choice of two sides: baked potato, herb parmesan whipped potato, mixed vegetables or corn on the cob. Who loves Costas?
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Grano Pasta Bar , the popular and often-crowded Italian restaurant in Hampden known for its fantastic pasta, recently opened a second, larger location. Grano, also known as Big Grano, is a few blocks away in a former tea room. With the larger location comes an expanded menu, with more beef, poultry and seafood dishes. But sometimes bigger isn't better. The much larger — yet intimate-feeling — restaurant is a step in the right direction. There is much more space than in the original, cramped location.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 10, 2008
No review of Sanders' Corner can start with anything but its fine covered porch overlooking the woods and fields surrounding Loch Raven Reservoir. Not for nothing do the servers wear T-shirts saying, "Sanders' Corner: That Dam Place." Decked out with striped awnings, tile-topped tables, potted plants and ceiling fans, it's one of Baltimore County's best spaces for eating casually outdoors. A new owner, John Naudain, took over this spring, sprucing the place up and adding curbside pickup, valet parking, delivery and a lounge.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 10, 2007
Here's a promise the dining-out crowd may love to hear: It'll be the best place to eat in the area. That's what the owner/chef of Canton's newest restaurant is vowing. Ted Stelzenmuller certainly knows East Baltimore restaurants. He's worked for the last few years in the vicinity, first at Red Fish, and then at Salt. If all goes as planned, starting tomorrow you'll be able to see whether he lives up to that promise, when he's set to open the doors of Jack's Bistro. OK. His name is Ted. Yet, his eatery is called Jack's.
NEWS
By CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND and CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2006
Summertime's long, warm days are the perfect setting for the ultimate alfresco dining experience: a picnic. Whether you're heading out to watch Fourth of July fireworks next Tuesday or attending an outdoor concert, a picnic packed with simple, easy-to-transport foods makes any summer outing a little special. To take the guesswork out of what to pack, we asked some experts to assemble picnics tailored to particular occasions, from a romantic open-air dinner for two to a family foray with a meal in a hamper.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
When does a Caesar salad stop being a Caesar salad and become something else altogether? Does it happen when you add a grilled chicken breast or a few slices of sirloin? When you add grilled salmon? Or a crab cake? Is it still a Caesar salad if you use Key lime juice instead of lemon juice? Grilled romaine instead of whole romaine leaves? If you use buttermilk, wasabi paste, avocado, tortilla chips, smoked cheddar or chili powder, is it still a Caesar salad? Salad creator Caesar Cardini would say, "No!"
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1996
This week we are reversing the focus for this speedy meal and we'll turn on the oven for the dessert and stick to a cool and simple entree. Dessert is an upside down classic that hails from France. It beats the clock over a traditional apple pie and I have a higher success rate and plenty of raves.This scrumptious chicken Caesar salad can be prepared within minutes at home when taking advantage of the many shortcut foods available at the supermarket.Chicken Caesar saladServes 48 cups washed, torn romaine lettuce from a salad bar or packaged prepared lettuce1 (10-ounce)
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Staff Writer Scarlett Cove Cafe Scarlett Cove Cafe, President and Pratt streets, (410) 783-8760. RTC Our meal wasn't as wonderful as it should have been for the money. None of it was bad, just indifferent. Order carefully, though, and you should have a pretty good dinner; I recommend shrimp in garlic sauce, the huge veal chop and the chocolate mousse roll for dessert. $$$ -- expensive. (Last reviewed 5/92.) MARY MAUSHARDStaff Writer Ralphie's Diner Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
No Way Jose CafeNo Way Jose Cafe, 1041-43 Marshall St., (410) 752-2837. If you like inventive food, there's plenty to love, from the guacamole salad in radicchio leaves to the mesquite grilled tuna on a tomato and leek concasse. This is already the hot spot to be, so plan to wait patiently and have another margarita. $$ -- moderate. (Last visited 5/92.) Ralphie's Diner, 9690 Deereco Road, Timonium, (410) 252-3990. Ralphie's can be many things to many people. It calls itself a diner. But there's enough dark wood paneling to build a fern bar. It makes excellent milk shakes.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
This could be a first - a place that plays country music and uses sun-dried tomatoes, fried leek sticks and pesto mayonnaise. Welcome to the Carried Away Gourmet. Located on Main Street in the heart of old Bel Air, Carried Away is a surprisingly good carryout that is interested in being far more than a BLT-slinging eatery. The country music notwithstanding, the owners have done up the inside of the old brick storefront with an urban sensibility: polished wood floors, cute light fixtures and a color scheme heavy on mustard and mauve.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 11, 2004
Pick a food trend, any trend. You'll probably find it at the new Copra on North Charles Street. OK, no Asian accents. But there are small plates, comfort food, expensive appetizers, inexpensive entrees, salads that are meals, sandwiches that are panini, brick-oven pizzas, roasted vegetables, chicken Caesar salad, death-by-chocolate cake and -- ta-da -- creme brulee. How can it miss? Well, for one thing, it helps if your stomach has an asbestos lining when you eat at Copra. This is the spiciest food I've had that wasn't advertised as spicy on the menu.
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