Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCactus
IN THE NEWS

Cactus

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 1998
Some people favor quantity over quality. Cactus Willies is the place for them - an all-you-can-eat buffet for only $7.49 a person.That's $7.49 for all the steak you want, all the barbecued, baked or fried chicken, all the fried or broiled fish, vegetables, potatoes, stuffing, salads of every kind, breads and pies and . . . well, you get the idea.On a hilltop above Cromwell Bridge Road, Cactus Willies is part of a chain of restaurants owned by managing partners Robert Katz and Brett Austin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
When I trim my shrubs, they seem to go crazy, with new branches growing in all directions. My neighbor's shrubs never do that. They look natural and graceful. How come? Pruning stimulates new growth, but you can control the direction of the growth. When you prune, cut back to just above a leaf bud. The trick is to select a leaf bud that is pointing in whatever direction you want growth to go. A bud pointing away from the plant will go outward from the plant. A bud pointing to the shrub's interior or toward a neighboring branch will get entangled and run into other branches.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 11, 1996
PHOENIX -- It's illegal here to shoot a cactus -- or ram one with your pickup or even dig one up without a permit.In Arizona, they take their cactuses seriously. And the saguaro, the tall, spiny, multiarmed symbol of the West, is taken most seriously of all. Mess with one and you may encounter one of the state's squad of plant protectors -- known as the cactus cops.Jim McGinnis doesn't understand why anyone would want to hurt a saguaro, but he has the photos to prove people do. From a file in his state Department of Agriculture office, he pulls pictures of mutilated victims -- saguaros that have been used for target practice, hacked at with machetes or knocked down by cars.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Why are my garlic cloves brown? I grow it from certified disease-free heads and rotate the garlic to avoid disease. We see from your photo that you've cut off the stem and roots. We suspect the garlic is not curing sufficiently before you store it. When you harvest, air-dry the garlic out of doors, out of direct sun, with the leaves, stems, and roots intact, for one to two weeks. Store retaining at least 4-6 inches of the stem and also the root. You can tie them into bunches to hang in your basement and have garlic all winter.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 29, 2008
If you love great football, you're probably wondering why the NFL chose to put this season's Super Bowl in Arizona. If you love a great cactus, however, this desert wonderland is the place to be. There are hundreds of varieties of cacti and succulents dotting the arid landscape that surrounds the Phoenix metropolitan area, including the classic saguaro cactus that can grow to heights of more than 50 feet. For some strange reason, however, cactus climbing has never caught on here. The locals enjoy golf, tennis and telling people how to get to the Grand Canyon, but they are also proud of the striking desertscapes burned into our collective consciousness by the many Western movies and television shows set here.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | November 11, 2006
We like the orange berries of a vine that started growing up our deck. Now we found the same type vine growing up a tree. My husband says they may be trouble. What do you think? The vine in your photo is Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), an ornamental import that turned out to be invasive. This vine smothers and pulls down trees. Leaves may be round or pointed ovals. Birds eat the berries, and then seedlings pop up under trees where birds perch. Pull all seedlings; their roots are orange-red.
NEWS
March 26, 1998
The Horn & Horn Smorgasbord in Westminster will close after dinner Easter Sunday, April 12, to be renovated and will reopen in May with a new identity -- Cactus Willie's Buffet and Bakery.Cactus Willie's has applied to the city for a sign permit at the site of the Horn & Horn, which has been at the 140 Village Shopping Center for more than 20 years."We hope to be open and operating by Friday, May 1." said Bob Katz, president of Horn & Horn and a managing partner in Cactus Willie's, an all-you-can-eat chain restaurant that features sirloin steak grilled to order, baked ham, fish, ribs, fried chicken, vegetables, a pasta bar, a salad bar and desserts.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 23, 2003
I am a family practitioner and want to share an herbal remedy with you. A 60-year-old male Hispanic diabetic patient has had trouble controlling his blood sugar. Despite intensive diet changes and a prescription for Glucovance, his blood sugar still ran in the 160s to 180s. One day he came in with his diary showing blood sugars of 90 to 100 consistently. I asked what he was doing differently, and he said in a low voice: "I got me a new girlfriend. She's from Mexico, and she makes me tea from nopalito [prickly pear]
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Why are my garlic cloves brown? I grow it from certified disease-free heads and rotate the garlic to avoid disease. We see from your photo that you've cut off the stem and roots. We suspect the garlic is not curing sufficiently before you store it. When you harvest, air-dry the garlic out of doors, out of direct sun, with the leaves, stems, and roots intact, for one to two weeks. Store retaining at least 4-6 inches of the stem and also the root. You can tie them into bunches to hang in your basement and have garlic all winter.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2004
As you gather plants for the patio pots, think beyond begonias and geraniums and consider the sculptural possibilities of cacti and succulents. They not only will bring interest to your outdoor plantings, but they are also tough survivors next winter in the bone-dry climate of a centrally heated home. Succulents and cacti are desert plants that thrive in dry air. But they also can tolerate temperature extremes, such as the sunny, hot days and cool nights of a winter windowsill. And if you if go away for a few days, they won't die from lack of water.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
As soon as I brought my Christmas cactus indoors, it budded. It has finished blooming before Thanksgiving! How can I slow it down next year? Night temperatures of 50-55 degrees initiate bud formation on this jungle cactus, also known as Thanksgiving cactus, Easter cactus, and Claw cactus. Next year, bring it in before nights get cool — late summer or very early fall. Those grown indoors year-round or brought in for the winter can be encouraged to bloom by giving them about 13 hours of darkness nightly.
SPORTS
Sports Direct | February 23, 2013
GRAPEFRUIT LEAGUE Mets 5, Nationals 3: Stephen Strasburg surrendered three hits over two innings - including a single and home run to the first two batters he faced - in his first action since Sept. 7. David Wright was hitless in three at-bats for New York, but Marlon Byrd went 2-for-2 and scored a run in his team debut.   Marlins 8, Cardinals 3: Juan Pierre collected two hits, scored twice and drove in a run while Giancarlo Stanton drove in two runs for Miami, which likely lost catcher Jeff Mathis for six weeks with a broken right collarbone.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
A child long lost and long forgotten is found, and returns home in time to spend Christmas at the side of a dying parent. It would be a Hallmark holiday movie special if it involved people. But this is a story about cactus. Seven years ago, Alex Boulton of Homeland bought a small agave at a plant sale held by Baltimore's Rawlings Conservatory in Druid Hill Park. It was a "pup," an offspring, of the enormous agave in the Conservatory's Desert Room. "It was ugly and had a very long, protruding root," said Boulton.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
It is a tragedy of botanical proportions. A giant agave basks in the warmth of Baltimore's Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, its spike of flower buds shooting through the roof and toward the sky. The cactus, a resident of the conservatory for decades, is known as the Century Plant for its long life. But a recent frost claimed its yellow petals before they could open, and now the agave will die without doing what it does just once during its time here on earth: bloom . "I called the director of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden," said Kate Blom, the conservatory greenhouse manager.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 29, 2008
If you love great football, you're probably wondering why the NFL chose to put this season's Super Bowl in Arizona. If you love a great cactus, however, this desert wonderland is the place to be. There are hundreds of varieties of cacti and succulents dotting the arid landscape that surrounds the Phoenix metropolitan area, including the classic saguaro cactus that can grow to heights of more than 50 feet. For some strange reason, however, cactus climbing has never caught on here. The locals enjoy golf, tennis and telling people how to get to the Grand Canyon, but they are also proud of the striking desertscapes burned into our collective consciousness by the many Western movies and television shows set here.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | November 11, 2006
We like the orange berries of a vine that started growing up our deck. Now we found the same type vine growing up a tree. My husband says they may be trouble. What do you think? The vine in your photo is Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), an ornamental import that turned out to be invasive. This vine smothers and pulls down trees. Leaves may be round or pointed ovals. Birds eat the berries, and then seedlings pop up under trees where birds perch. Pull all seedlings; their roots are orange-red.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
When I trim my shrubs, they seem to go crazy, with new branches growing in all directions. My neighbor's shrubs never do that. They look natural and graceful. How come? Pruning stimulates new growth, but you can control the direction of the growth. When you prune, cut back to just above a leaf bud. The trick is to select a leaf bud that is pointing in whatever direction you want growth to go. A bud pointing away from the plant will go outward from the plant. A bud pointing to the shrub's interior or toward a neighboring branch will get entangled and run into other branches.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
THE DUTCH held Theo van Gogh's funeral yesterday, his plain coffin decorated with a pack of French cigarettes and a bottle of white wine. On the spot where the provocative filmmaker died - where he was pulled off his bicycle and stabbed to death - mourners placed a cactus, a tribute to his prickly personality, but perhaps an emblem as well of a new mood in the Netherlands. Mr. Van Gogh mocked the intolerant strains in his country's Muslim community, and the suspect in his murder is a young Muslim from North Africa.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
THE DUTCH held Theo van Gogh's funeral yesterday, his plain coffin decorated with a pack of French cigarettes and a bottle of white wine. On the spot where the provocative filmmaker died - where he was pulled off his bicycle and stabbed to death - mourners placed a cactus, a tribute to his prickly personality, but perhaps an emblem as well of a new mood in the Netherlands. Mr. Van Gogh mocked the intolerant strains in his country's Muslim community, and the suspect in his murder is a young Muslim from North Africa.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2004
As you gather plants for the patio pots, think beyond begonias and geraniums and consider the sculptural possibilities of cacti and succulents. They not only will bring interest to your outdoor plantings, but they are also tough survivors next winter in the bone-dry climate of a centrally heated home. Succulents and cacti are desert plants that thrive in dry air. But they also can tolerate temperature extremes, such as the sunny, hot days and cool nights of a winter windowsill. And if you if go away for a few days, they won't die from lack of water.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.