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By Mary Maushard | August 15, 1991
Funny. A kitchen that can turn out flawless scallops falters on rice pilaf, serving tasteless, dry kernels not as flavorful as most packaged rice mixes.Funny. A kitchen that can produce succulent veal in a beautiful bearnaise trips over a baked potato, serving a shriveled spud that stayed too long at the steam table.Funny, isn't it?But that's what we found at a recent meal at Cacao Lane in Ellicott City. The hard stuff came off without a hitch, but the seemingly simple side dishes didn't make it. Perhaps someone wasn't paying attention.
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By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 2007
Watch rivulets of dark chocolate sauce pour down the curves of a scoop of ice cream or over the low cliffs of a raspberry tart and you get a hint of the transformative power of a good chocolate sauce. Thick and velvety, deeply, sensuously flavorful, such a sauce can dress up a simple dessert or, just in time for the holidays, elevate a great one. It's pretty good eaten straight with a spoon, too. Years ago, chocolate sauces were made with bricks of baker's chocolate or cocoa powder, with lots of sugar and vanilla to mask the bitterness, and heavy doses of cream or butter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
Al Parsons has no clue how his restaurant got its name. But because it had a good reputation when he bought it 25 years ago, he's never changed the name. As the saying goes, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Cacao (pronounced KO-ko) Lane is upholding its good reputation still. Housed in an imposing building constructed around 1834, the 28-year-old restaurant and bar overlooks Ellicott City's charming Main Street. Inside the cozy dining room, votive candles under beaded shades cast a romantic glow over the tables.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 24, 2006
Have you noticed bigger numbers on chocolate bars in the baking aisle? We don't necessarily mean the price tags. Rather, more companies are selling bars with 70 to 72 percent chocolate. Where a bittersweet bar of a decade ago might have had 50 or 60 percent chocolate liquor (that's the official term), these bars are upping the ante, offering super-intense flavors that focus on more chocolate and less sugar. We tasted eight brands we used in a ganache (a rich filling/icing) that combined 4 ounces chopped chocolate with 4 ounces whipping cream.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Cacao Lane restaurant was born on Ellicott City's historic Main Street two years after the flooded wreckage of Tropical Storm Agnes was cleared away in 1972 -- and it has survived and prospered along with Lori and Allen Parsons, who bought it in 1977.Occupying three adjoining stone houses that date to 1834, the restaurant is marked by its maroon front awning and bare, 2-foot-thick granite walls and brick floors. The Parsons kept the restaurant's name but "don't have a clue" about its origin, Lori Parsons said.
FEATURES
June 1, 1994
* At least 2000 B.C.: Estimated origins of cacao, in the Amazon or Orinoco basin.* A.D. 460-480: Date assigned to cocoa residue discovered in Mayan vessels in northeastern Guatemala.* 1502: After his fourth voyage to the New World, Christopher Columbus takes cacao beans back to Spain.* 1528: Spanish explorer Hernando Cortes observes Montezuma, Aztec emperor of Mexico, consuming a drink made of burnt and ground cacao nibs, maize, water and spices; he sends beans and recipes back to King Charles V in Spain.
FEATURES
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,NEWSDAY | March 11, 1998
An extra helping of prestige with your chocolate?According to food consultant Maricel Presilla, it won't be long before Venezuelan cacao bean growers offer "estate grown" chocolates, which she said have "incredible chocolate flavor."The improvements in chocolate are expected because of better scientific understanding of chocolate itself, better growing practices for cacao trees, more attention to the varieties of cacao beans and control over quality and processing.At a recent symposium on "the science of chocolate," Presilla said that Venezuela is already producing regional types of chocolate -- and they have "enormous flavor differences."
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening SunThe Sun The Sunday Sun | August 31, 1991
Cacao Lane, 8066 Main St., Ellicott City, 461-1378. Cacao Lane is a Howard County favorite that fills three buildings -- each with a different front -- on Ellicott City's Main Street. It is dark and winding with stone walls and mismatched chandeliers. Cacao Lane has a small but interesting menu, with chicken and seafood predominating, and a sampling of steaks, lamb chops and veal dishes. The night we were there, a sheet of hand-written specials accompanied the menu. The food was uneven. I had scallops, perfectly tender in a garlic-wine sauce, but an accompanying rice pilaf that was so hard and tasteless it should never have left the kitchen.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
As Feb. 14 approaches, here's a Valentine from the candy world: Chocolate can be good for you in small doses, and growing it might help the environment. Some of the world's most highly respected chocolate experts are meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington today for tastings, lectures and discussions that focus on environmentally friendly ways to produce cocoa and the health benefits linked to it. Along with that hearts-and-flowers news for chocolate consumers, seduction is on the menu - some scientists are still trying to figure out how chocolate came by that certain je ne sais quoi, its somewhat rakish association with romance.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
In addition to a new name and new owners, Morty's is getting a new image.The barbecue-style restaurant on Route 32 in Eldersburg will be Nathan Henry's by mid-December, the new owners told the Carroll County liquor board Tuesday."
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
It was quiet in the Cacao Lane Bar and Restaurant. The lunchtime customers had cleared out. The tables were set for dinner with wine glasses and linen napkins. The problem for Andrew Lutz was outside. "Today [Aug. 10] was supposed to be the deadline," said Lutz, Cacao Lane's general manager, pointing out the restaurant's front window. Just across the sidewalk, in the shadow of the Cacao Lane's green awning, a 50-foot-long trench was torn in historic Ellicott City's narrow Main Street.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
As Feb. 14 approaches, here's a Valentine from the candy world: Chocolate can be good for you in small doses, and growing it might help the environment. Some of the world's most highly respected chocolate experts are meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington today for tastings, lectures and discussions that focus on environmentally friendly ways to produce cocoa and the health benefits linked to it. Along with that hearts-and-flowers news for chocolate consumers, seduction is on the menu - some scientists are still trying to figure out how chocolate came by that certain je ne sais quoi, its somewhat rakish association with romance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
Al Parsons has no clue how his restaurant got its name. But because it had a good reputation when he bought it 25 years ago, he's never changed the name. As the saying goes, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Cacao (pronounced KO-ko) Lane is upholding its good reputation still. Housed in an imposing building constructed around 1834, the 28-year-old restaurant and bar overlooks Ellicott City's charming Main Street. Inside the cozy dining room, votive candles under beaded shades cast a romantic glow over the tables.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Cacao Lane restaurant was born on Ellicott City's historic Main Street two years after the flooded wreckage of Tropical Storm Agnes was cleared away in 1972 -- and it has survived and prospered along with Lori and Allen Parsons, who bought it in 1977.Occupying three adjoining stone houses that date to 1834, the restaurant is marked by its maroon front awning and bare, 2-foot-thick granite walls and brick floors. The Parsons kept the restaurant's name but "don't have a clue" about its origin, Lori Parsons said.
FEATURES
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,NEWSDAY | March 11, 1998
An extra helping of prestige with your chocolate?According to food consultant Maricel Presilla, it won't be long before Venezuelan cacao bean growers offer "estate grown" chocolates, which she said have "incredible chocolate flavor."The improvements in chocolate are expected because of better scientific understanding of chocolate itself, better growing practices for cacao trees, more attention to the varieties of cacao beans and control over quality and processing.At a recent symposium on "the science of chocolate," Presilla said that Venezuela is already producing regional types of chocolate -- and they have "enormous flavor differences."
FEATURES
June 1, 1994
* At least 2000 B.C.: Estimated origins of cacao, in the Amazon or Orinoco basin.* A.D. 460-480: Date assigned to cocoa residue discovered in Mayan vessels in northeastern Guatemala.* 1502: After his fourth voyage to the New World, Christopher Columbus takes cacao beans back to Spain.* 1528: Spanish explorer Hernando Cortes observes Montezuma, Aztec emperor of Mexico, consuming a drink made of burnt and ground cacao nibs, maize, water and spices; he sends beans and recipes back to King Charles V in Spain.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
It was quiet in the Cacao Lane Bar and Restaurant. The lunchtime customers had cleared out. The tables were set for dinner with wine glasses and linen napkins. The problem for Andrew Lutz was outside. "Today [Aug. 10] was supposed to be the deadline," said Lutz, Cacao Lane's general manager, pointing out the restaurant's front window. Just across the sidewalk, in the shadow of the Cacao Lane's green awning, a 50-foot-long trench was torn in historic Ellicott City's narrow Main Street.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 24, 2006
Have you noticed bigger numbers on chocolate bars in the baking aisle? We don't necessarily mean the price tags. Rather, more companies are selling bars with 70 to 72 percent chocolate. Where a bittersweet bar of a decade ago might have had 50 or 60 percent chocolate liquor (that's the official term), these bars are upping the ante, offering super-intense flavors that focus on more chocolate and less sugar. We tasted eight brands we used in a ganache (a rich filling/icing) that combined 4 ounces chopped chocolate with 4 ounces whipping cream.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
In addition to a new name and new owners, Morty's is getting a new image.The barbecue-style restaurant on Route 32 in Eldersburg will be Nathan Henry's by mid-December, the new owners told the Carroll County liquor board Tuesday."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
In addition to a new name and new owners, Morty's is getting a new image.The barbecue-style restaurant on Route 32 in Eldersburg will be Nathan Henry's by mid-December, the new owners told the Carroll County liquor board Tuesday.After that, the facility is in for more than a few changes."We intend to upgrade the menu and provide more variety," said Michael Williams of Catonsville, one of the restaurant's three new owners. "Right now, they're heavily into chicken and ribs. Our background is American, continental-style dining."
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