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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
A caboose could lead visitors to Sykesville if the town can sidetrack the railroad car along Route 32."We are going to try to put the caboose on a lot along Route 32," said James L. Schumacher, town manager. "It will be a sign promoting Main Street, a really great drawing card."Where to park the caboose depends on property owners and the State Highway Administration, Mr. Schumacher said.The town, which hopes to build its tourism industry on its railroad roots, owns two cabooses and leases a Pullman car, which houses its model railroad exhibit, for $1 a year.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Margaret I. "Meg" Sicher, a Jemicy School volunteer who headed the Owings Mills school's bookstore for many years, died Thursday of complications from a brain tumor at the Brightwood Center in Lutherville. The Riderwood resident was 49. Margaret Iglehart French was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1977 graduate of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. Mrs. Sicher attended Skidmore College and earned a bachelor's degree in history from the University of Virginia in 1982.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
A carpenter, experienced in restorations, is breathing new life into a 75-year-old railroad caboose and hopes to open it as an antiques and gifts shop in Sykesville next month.But the job has turned out to be bigger than he expected, and he is asking the town for financial help.John W. Greenan III is at work refurbishing the little red car, which belongs to the town and is parked on a siding near the railroad station. He has restained the interior paneling; carpeted the floor; installed shelves, heat and track lighting; and repaired the leaking windows and roof.
TRAVEL
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
CASS, W.Va. - Atop the third highest peak in West Virginia, an eerie whistle snaked its way through the thick birch and spruce trees. The sound echoed from a churning 1945 Shay steam locomotive, the last one ever built. During the warm months, the 162-ton brute carries hundreds of tourists and a few campers up and down the Cass Scenic Railroad, the former artery of a century-old logging operation in the Allegheny Mountains. Local residents and railway buffs fought to preserve the line in the 1960s, after a paper company moved on to fresher forests and hired a scrapper to tear up the railroad.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
The newest stop in the Sykesville shopping experience opened on the railroad tracks Saturday.The Little Red Caboose, parked on the side rails near Main Street, is now a shop stocked with antiques, crafts, even a few model train cars.Gloria G. Lapkoff said she is simultaneously opening the shop and clearing her home in Silver Spring of collectibles."My husband told me that I could just put price stickers on everything in the house," Ms. Lapkoff said. "I am doing just that but in a different place."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
A river trader is coming to Sykesville to open a business on the rails.Bob Dubinski plans to splash on some paint, plug the leaks and renovate the town's red caboose for his antiques and collectibles business.He'll add a platform before he welcomes customers aboard the Red River Trader, where he will peddle cowboy and American Indian items and Civil War memorabilia."I will have leather goods, Indian blankets, saddles and buffalo horns," he said. He also has some buffalo furniture, including a chair with horned arms.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
When Joshua Merrihew's grandmother visited from California, he took her to one of his favorite places, the B&O Railroad Station Museum. The 5-year-old wanted to show off the caboose that's permanently parked at the Ellicott City landmark. But Joshua and other visitors were turned away. Although the museum was open, the caboose was off-limits to visitors, beginning April 1, when much-needed renovations began. "He was disappointed that it was closed," said Joshua's mother, Cheri Merrihew of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1995
Where a gift shop failed in Sykesville, a model railroad club has a proven track record.The Sykesville and Patapsco Railway club has refurbished a Pullman car and made it home to its model layouts. Members would like to expand the display into the attached caboose, which Gloria Lapkoff recently vacated after her shop failed to attract customers."Any business would have a tough time at that location," said Mark Bennett, club president.Both cars are on the old tracks behind Main Street and Sandosky Road and just out of view of commercial traffic.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 16, 2007
Shorty Miller paced in a cold drizzle yesterday morning, watching workers hoist tall cranes and wrap thick straps around the yellow caboose. About 9 o'clock, as a man in a hard hat raised his arms like an orchestra conductor, the caboose rose into the air. Miller, his white hair damp with rain, offered suggestions to the workers as the caboose dangled over the flatbed truck that would carry it away. Then in a quiet voice he said, "Well, I seen 'em come, and I seen 'em go." More than 20 years ago, Jacob Miller, who is known as "Shorty," bought five older cabooses as a gift for the people of Lansdowne and a tribute to the area's railroad history.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Margaret I. "Meg" Sicher, a Jemicy School volunteer who headed the Owings Mills school's bookstore for many years, died Thursday of complications from a brain tumor at the Brightwood Center in Lutherville. The Riderwood resident was 49. Margaret Iglehart French was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1977 graduate of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. Mrs. Sicher attended Skidmore College and earned a bachelor's degree in history from the University of Virginia in 1982.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 16, 2007
Shorty Miller paced in a cold drizzle yesterday morning, watching workers hoist tall cranes and wrap thick straps around the yellow caboose. About 9 o'clock, as a man in a hard hat raised his arms like an orchestra conductor, the caboose rose into the air. Miller, his white hair damp with rain, offered suggestions to the workers as the caboose dangled over the flatbed truck that would carry it away. Then in a quiet voice he said, "Well, I seen 'em come, and I seen 'em go." More than 20 years ago, Jacob Miller, who is known as "Shorty," bought five older cabooses as a gift for the people of Lansdowne and a tribute to the area's railroad history.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
For nearly two decades, the antique cabooses have sat near the train tracks on Hammonds Ferry Road. Children have swung up the metal steps to play conductor and all sorts of folks have sat on the cabooses to watch the passenger trains speed by or count the cars on rumbling freight trains. Although their paint is chipped and fading, the cabooses are a landmark, Lansdowne residents say, and a reminder of the important role that trains have played in this southwestern Baltimore County community, once home to many employees of the B&O Railroad.
NEWS
December 30, 2004
On December 26, 2004 SHARON M. MUCHNIKOFF beloved mother of David Muchnikoff, Daly City, CA; beloved daughter of Mary B. Kendall, Balto. MD,; beloved sister of Iris Shepherd, Columbia, MD. Also survived by grandsons Noah and Manny Muchnikoff. Memorial service Sunday, January 2, 2005 11 a.m. at 9526 Caboose Court, Columbia, MD.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
When Clyde Morris was in his 70s, he decided to build a museum. His friends said he was crazy. Virginia, his wife of 55 years, said he was too old. His neighbors simply shook their heads in disbelief, wondering how a man Morris' age could ever see such a project to completion. But Morris had a dream. As he tells it, he was not to be dissuaded. "I don't think anyone could have stopped me," he said. "I had it pretty well planned out." So it came to be that in 1998, Morris opened the doors to the Morris Meadows Museum, a collection of early American antiques and artifacts 35 miles north of Baltimore in Freeland.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
When Joshua Merrihew's grandmother visited from California, he took her to one of his favorite places, the B&O Railroad Station Museum. The 5-year-old wanted to show off the caboose that's permanently parked at the Ellicott City landmark. But Joshua and other visitors were turned away. Although the museum was open, the caboose was off-limits to visitors beginning April 1, when much-needed renovations began. "He was disappointed that it was closed," said Joshua's mother, Cheri Merrihew of Ellicott City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 24, 2000
Italian Festival Feast on fried dough, calzone, meatballs, ravioli and cannoli this weekend. Play bingo, browse art exhibits and listen to Italian music on the streets surrounding St. Leo's Roman Catholic Church in Little Italy. The annual Italian Festival, held in honor of St. Gabriel, also features a bocce tournament beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Little Italy Bocce Field, 902-904 Stiles St. Children's rides are an added attraction to this year's event. The festival opens at noon Saturday and after a 9:30 a.m. Mass Sunday; closing time is 8 p.m. each day. Admission is free.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2003
When Clyde Morris was in his 70s, he decided to build a museum. His friends said he was crazy. Virginia, his wife of 55 years, said he was too old. His neighbors simply shook their heads in disbelief, wondering how a man Morris' age could ever see such a project to completion. But Morris had a dream. As he tells it, he was not to be dissuaded. "I don't think anyone could have stopped me," he said. "I had it pretty well planned out." So it came to be that in 1998, Morris opened the doors to the Morris Meadows Museum, a collection of early American antiques and artifacts 35 miles north of Baltimore in Freeland.
NEWS
July 26, 1996
Police logOakland Mills: 9500 block of Caboose Court: Someone entered a home at 7: 30 a.m. by prying a rear door. The person fled after being discovered by a resident.Kings Contrivance: 9000 block of Early Way: A turquoise 1993 Plymouth Acclaim, Maryland tags BDE-678, was stolen about 11: 45 p.m. Wednesday.Pub Date: 7/26/96
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