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Cable Thieves

NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
As its final amnesty program comes to an end, Comcast Cablevision is being flooded with calls from people afraid of being prosecuted for stealing cable service and those who are finally deciding to confess and pay, a company spokesman said."
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 2000
A construction crew demolishing a vacant house on Mountain Road broke a natural gas line yesterday morning, forcing authorities to close a portion of the road for more than an hour. The broken line was next to the Jacobsville fire station, where firefighters remained on standby in case their help was needed while Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. workers made repairs. Construction workers were tearing down the house to clear the site for a new medical office complex when they accidentally hit the gas line, said Lt. Robert Rose, a fire department spokesman.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III and WILLIAM PATALON III,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Cable provider Comcast Corp. has put cable-signal thieves on notice: Turn yourself in during a two-week amnesty program or risk fines and criminal prosecution. Comcast said yesterday that it was conducting the amnesty program from Tuesday to Nov. 14 in markets in Maryland, Washington and Northern Virginia. The last time around - in 2003 - Comcast said about 8,000 people turned themselves in while several thousand others who knew people getting illegal service notified the company. "We're trying to do all we can to protect our [cable system]
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
An outlaw cable guy could spend five years in prison for altering converter boxes to give customers free access to premium cable channels.Gerald D. Kosinski, 45, of the 100 block of Severn Way, Arnold, is scheduled to be sentenced July 25 by Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. on two counts of theft. He could be fined up to $5,000.Kosinski, a former satellite-television-system installer, admitted in court Monday that for a nine-month period ending in December he altered and sold converter boxes at a shop in his home.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
Overwhelmed by thousands of calls from people scared by well-publicized prosecutions of cable TV thieves, the Comcast and Storer cable television companies are offering amnesty from prosecution for the holidays.The "one last, absolute final" turn-yourself-in-with-no-questions-asked period will begin Monday and extend through Dec. 31, according to David H. Nevins, president of Nevins and Associates, a Comcast spokesman.Howard B. Merker, deputy state's attorney for Baltimore County, said yesterday that Comcast did the groundwork for about 75 theft cases that have been already been prosecuted by his office under a new state cable-theft law that took effect Oct. 1.But Mr. Nevins said the cable company would rather gain customers than rack up convictions.
NEWS
November 4, 2005
Flu-shot clinics now open to everyone The Howard County Health Department has lifted the "high priority" designation for flu-shot clinics this season. Anyone seeking a flu vaccination is now welcome to attend one of its clinics. The cost of the vaccination is $20, which will be covered by Medicare Part B. Payment on a sliding scale is available upon request. FluMist will be administered by appointment only at the county's three health centers: Columbia Health Center (410-313-7500); Ellicott City Health Center (410-313-2333)
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
The Howard Cable Television technician runs his hand-held "sniffer" near the wires of yet another broken cable TV box outside an apartment complex in Laurel.The sniffer, the Geiger counter of the cable TV industry, looks like a walkie-talkie. It emits a whir and sends the frequency detection meter swinging toward the red zone, indicating a conspicuous cable TV signal leakage.John Wade, Howard Cable TV audit coordinator, checks his master list of addresses in the company's service zone, which shows all current and previously disconnected subscribers and all residences that never have been hooked up. He discovers that two of the eight potential customers in the apartment building are receiving cable TV service illegally.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Someone in Waverly is going to regret boasting about the free cable they've been getting for years -- especially since a friend just tipped off Comcast Corp. about it. "They have been having this for a while now," the e-mailer alerted the company Tuesday. "Please don't tell them it was me who did this." In Maryland, Comcast spends hundreds of thousands of dollars yearly to block theft. That's a fraction of the revenue the nation's largest cable television provider says it loses to cable piracy.
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