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Cable Thieves

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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
It worked with cable thieves in Baltimore County, so now Comcast Cable is taking its amnesty campaign to Howard County.Beginning May 1, cable thieves in Howard County can turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- to Comcast's offspring, Storer/Howard County Cable. The amnesty program will end June 16, when Comcast says it will start prosecuting cable thieves.The company, which has about 42,000 subscribers in the eastern half of the county, is owned by Storer Communications, a subsidiary of Comcast.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
Anne Arundel cable fugitives now have a chance to "fess up." Starting yesterday, Comcast Cable has begun letting county cable thieves turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- without threat of legal prosecution. The company, along with the state's attorney's office, has vowed to hunt down illegal cable users who refuse the offer. The 15-day amnesty period, which runs through July 30, is the first Comcast has instituted in the county since it recently took over Jones Communications, and the first in the area for years.
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NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
In the endless cat-and-mouse game between cable TV companies and cable thieves, it's hard to tell who has the upper hand.On one side is a multibillion-dollar industry, with 58 million households hooked up nationwide.On the other are amateur electronics dabblers, mail order houses, small businesses and an ugly new player -- drug gangs using their networks of junkies to steal cable TV equipment.The cable TV industry has armed itself with magic bullets, terminators, sniffers, snitches, private investigators and sting operations to fight this array, and is backed by the FBI and local police departments.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
If you're stealing cable service, Comcast Cablevision has a deal for you.The company is kicking off an amnesty period today for people who pilfer its programming. Under the terms of the amnesty, any resident of Comcast's service area -- Baltimore, Howard and Harford counties -- who is pirating cable can call the company and either begin paying for service or have it disconnected, no questions asked.People who take advantage of the amnesty won't be prosecuted under Maryland's cable theft law, which levies prison terms of up to five years and fines of as much as $5,000.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 3, 1992
Six kids in Baltimore and Howard counties snitched on thei parents because they were getting cable television service illegally. Does this represent hope for humanity or the death of the family?Personally, I think it's evidence of the Bart Simpsonization of America. Let's face it: If Bart knew that Homer was getting illicit cable and that the cable cops were coming, he'd turn Dad in. Or extort hush money from him.We don't know if any little Barts or Bartettes forced their parents to pay hush money.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer PHC zrB | April 16, 1992
It worked with cable thieves in Baltimore County, so now Comcast Cable is taking its amnesty campaign to Howard County.Beginning May 1, cable thieves in Howard County can turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- to Comcast's offspring, Storer/Howard County Cable. The amnesty program will end June 16, when Comcast says it will start prosecuting cable thieves.The company, which has about 42,000 subscribers in the eastern half of the county, is owned by Storer Communications, which is a subsidiary of Comcast.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Cable thieves, watch out: Comcast Cablevision is coming after you.Comcast, which provides cable service in Baltimore County to 160,000 paying subscribers, claims at least 40,000 other people receive its services illegally. And the company says it isn't going to take it any more.For six weeks beginning today, Comcast will permit cable thieves to turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- as part of an amnesty program. After that, it's going to be lawsuit time, said Curt Pendleton, general manager for Comcast in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Cable thieves, watch out: Comcast Cablevision is coming after you.Comcast, which provides cable service in Baltimore County to 160,000 paying subscribers, claims that there are at least 40,000 other hookups that are illegal. And the company says it isn't going to take it anymore.For six weeks beginning today, Comcast will permit cable thieves to turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- as part of an amnesty program. After that, it's going to be lawsuit time, said Curt Pendleton, general manager for Comcast in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Wielding only coaxial cable, screwdrivers and pliers, they steal millions of dollars worth of cable TV signals.These cable pirates illegally link to the service at cable boxes, telephone polls or in apartment complex equipment rooms.Thieves get into the cable boxes by cutting locks with a hacksaw, hitting them with a sledgehammer, even driving vehicles into them.Comcast Cable, Harford County's largest cable provider with 40,000 customers, reports losing about $2 million a year in revenue to thieves.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Television is full of cop shows. And coming to a Comcast Cablevision-equipped set near you is "Good Cop, Bad Cop."Beginning today, Comcast will offer a monthlong amnesty to what it says are 10,000 to 15,000 local households that are stealing cable service. After that, they say, they're coming to get you -- and have new technology to help them do it."After this is over, we're launching an all-out blitz on this," said Jaye Gamble, Comcast's area vice president for Maryland.Comcast says cable theft is a recurring problem, but one that is much smaller than before its last amnesty program in 1992.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
In the endless cat-and-mouse game between cable TV companies and cable thieves, it's hard to tell who has the upper hand.On one side is a multibillion-dollar industry, with 58 million households hooked up nationwide.On the other are amateur electronics dabblers, mail order houses, small businesses and an ugly new player -- drug gangs using their networks of junkies to steal cable TV equipment.The cable TV industry has armed itself with magic bullets, terminators, sniffers, snitches, private investigators and sting operations to fight this array, and is backed by the FBI and local police departments.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
Super Bowl Sunday this weekend could be followed by Blue Monday if Howard County residents who are illegally receiving cable television service don't 'fess up.Storer/Howard Cable Television is allowing those who have their homes hooked up for cable programming without paying for the service to turn themselves in to the company by Sunday with no questions asked and no risk of prosecution.But once the monthlong amnesty ends, Storer/Howard Cable TV pledges to prosecute those who are detected receiving cable illegally.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Wielding only coaxial cable, screwdrivers and pliers, they steal millions of dollars worth of cable TV signals.These cable pirates illegally link to the service at cable boxes, telephone polls or in apartment complex equipment rooms.Thieves get into the cable boxes by cutting locks with a hacksaw, hitting them with a sledgehammer, even driving vehicles into them.Comcast Cable, Harford County's largest cable provider with 40,000 customers, reports losing about $2 million a year in revenue to thieves.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
Howard County cable pirates have one last chance to come clean.Storer/Howard Cable Television is offering a monthlong, no-questions-asked amnesty period until Jan. 31, to allow cable thieves to turn themselves in -- or risk prosecution."
NEWS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
Life is getting tough for cable thieves in Baltimore County: First, Comcast Cablevision gave them until May 15 to 'fess up or suffer the consequences. Now, swindlers are hitting them up for $50 in a door-to-door cable scam of their own.According to Comcast, swindlers passing themselves off as Comcast auditors are knocking on doors throughout the county and offering to unhook illegal cable customers to help them avoid prosecution by Comcast. The company has said it plans to go after cable thieves when its amnesty program ends May 15.For a $50 charge, the scam artists offer to disconnect the illegal hookup or to look the other way when Comcast starts reporting people for prosecution after the amnesty period.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
Life is getting tough for cable thieves in Baltimore County: First, Comcast Cablevision gave them until May 15 to fess up or suffer the consequences. Now, swindlers are hitting them up for $50 in a door-to-door cable scam of their own.According to Comcast, swindlers passing themselves off as Comcast auditors are knocking on doors throughout the county and offering to unhook illegal cable customers to help them avoid prosecution by Comcast. The company has said it plans to go after cable thieves when its amnesty program ends May 15.For a $50 charge, the scam artists offer to disconnect the illegal hookup or to look the other way when Comcast starts reporting people for prosecution after the amnesty period.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
As its final amnesty program comes to an end, Comcast Cablevision is being flooded with calls from people afraid of being prosecuted for stealing cable service and those who are finally deciding to confess and pay, a company spokesman said."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 3, 1992
Six kids in Baltimore and Howard counties snitched on thei parents because they were getting cable television service illegally. Does this represent hope for humanity or the death of the family?Personally, I think it's evidence of the Bart Simpsonization of America. Let's face it: If Bart knew that Homer was getting illicit cable and that the cable cops were coming, he'd turn Dad in. Or extort hush money from him.We don't know if any little Barts or Bartettes forced their parents to pay hush money.
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