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NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
Comcast Cablevision, weary of viewers stealing its signals, is using a new state law to crack down on suspected thieves.Comcast, with 240,000 customers in Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, has turned 75 people over to prosecutors since an amnesty program ended in May. Everyone whose case has come to trial has either pleaded guilty, been convicted or accepted probation before judgment, according to a Comcast spokesman. One defendant was sentenced to a six-month jail term.The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, makes cable fraud easier to prove while making penalties tougher.
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BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Someone in Waverly is going to regret boasting about the free cable they've been getting for years -- especially since a friend just tipped off Comcast Corp. about it. "They have been having this for a while now," the e-mailer alerted the company Tuesday. "Please don't tell them it was me who did this." In Maryland, Comcast spends hundreds of thousands of dollars yearly to block theft. That's a fraction of the revenue the nation's largest cable television provider says it loses to cable piracy.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
Anne Arundel cable fugitives now have a chance to "fess up." Starting yesterday, Comcast Cable has begun letting county cable thieves turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- without threat of legal prosecution. The company, along with the state's attorney's office, has vowed to hunt down illegal cable users who refuse the offer. The 15-day amnesty period, which runs through July 30, is the first Comcast has instituted in the county since it recently took over Jones Communications, and the first in the area for years.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
Anne Arundel cable fugitives now have a chance to "fess up." Starting yesterday, Comcast Cable has begun letting county cable thieves turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- without threat of legal prosecution. The company, along with the state's attorney's office, has vowed to hunt down illegal cable users who refuse the offer. The 15-day amnesty period, which runs through July 30, is the first Comcast has instituted in the county since it recently took over Jones Communications, and the first in the area for years.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
Comcast Cablevision, weary of viewers stealing its signals, i using a new state law to crack down on suspected thieves.Comcast, with 240,000 customers in Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, has turned 75 people over to prosecutors since an amnesty program ended in May. Everyone whose case has come to trial has either pleaded guilty, been convicted or accepted probation before judgment, according to a Comcast spokesman. One defendant was sentenced to a six-month jail term.The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, makes cable fraud easier to prove while making penalties tougher.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Television is full of cop shows. And coming to a Comcast Cablevision-equipped set near you is "Good Cop, Bad Cop."Beginning today, Comcast will offer a monthlong amnesty to what it says are 10,000 to 15,000 local households that are stealing cable service. After that, they say, they're coming to get you -- and have new technology to help them do it."After this is over, we're launching an all-out blitz on this," said Jaye Gamble, Comcast's area vice president for Maryland.Comcast says cable theft is a recurring problem, but one that is much smaller than before its last amnesty program in 1992.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Cable thieves, watch out: Comcast Cablevision is coming after you.Comcast, which provides cable service in Baltimore County to 160,000 paying subscribers, claims at least 40,000 other people receive its services illegally. And the company says it isn't going to take it any more.For six weeks beginning today, Comcast will permit cable thieves to turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- as part of an amnesty program. After that, it's going to be lawsuit time, said Curt Pendleton, general manager for Comcast in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
If you're stealing cable service, Comcast Cablevision has a deal for you.The company is kicking off an amnesty period today for people who pilfer its programming. Under the terms of the amnesty, any resident of Comcast's service area -- Baltimore, Howard and Harford counties -- who is pirating cable can call the company and either begin paying for service or have it disconnected, no questions asked.People who take advantage of the amnesty won't be prosecuted under Maryland's cable theft law, which levies prison terms of up to five years and fines of as much as $5,000.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Cable thieves, watch out: Comcast Cablevision is coming after you.Comcast, which provides cable service in Baltimore County to 160,000 paying subscribers, claims that there are at least 40,000 other hookups that are illegal. And the company says it isn't going to take it anymore.For six weeks beginning today, Comcast will permit cable thieves to turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- as part of an amnesty program. After that, it's going to be lawsuit time, said Curt Pendleton, general manager for Comcast in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
If you're stealing cable service, Comcast Cablevision has a deal for you.The company is kicking off an amnesty period today for people who pilfer its programming. Under the terms of the amnesty, any resident of Comcast's service area -- Baltimore, Howard and Harford counties -- who is pirating cable can call the company and either begin paying for service or have it disconnected, no questions asked.People who take advantage of the amnesty won't be prosecuted under Maryland's cable theft law, which levies prison terms of up to five years and fines of as much as $5,000.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
Television is full of cop shows. And coming to a Comcast Cablevision-equipped set near you is "Good Cop, Bad Cop."Beginning today, Comcast will offer a monthlong amnesty to what it says are 10,000 to 15,000 local households that are stealing cable service. After that, they say, they're coming to get you -- and have new technology to help them do it."After this is over, we're launching an all-out blitz on this," said Jaye Gamble, Comcast's area vice president for Maryland.Comcast says cable theft is a recurring problem, but one that is much smaller than before its last amnesty program in 1992.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
An outlaw cable guy could spend five years in prison for altering converter boxes to give customers free access to premium cable channels.Gerald D. Kosinski, 45, of the 100 block of Severn Way, Arnold, is scheduled to be sentenced July 25 by Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. on two counts of theft. He could be fined up to $5,000.Kosinski, a former satellite-television-system installer, admitted in court Monday that for a nine-month period ending in December he altered and sold converter boxes at a shop in his home.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | February 12, 1993
Orioles games will be more expensive and less convenient for Baltimore County residents this season -- even if they stay home.Comcast Cablevision of Baltimore County, adopting the practice most area cable companies, has changed the requirements for its 20,000 Home Team Sports subscribers. HTS carries Orioles games and other sports.Starting April 1, Baltimore County subscribers will need an "addressable" converter box to catch HTS. (Addressable boxes are those that can receive pay-per-view or other special programming.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
About 1,350 Howard County residents avoided the risk of prosecution by calling Howard Cable Television before Sunday's amnesty deadline to report that they were receiving cable service illegally, a company spokesman said.Those who are discovered through an audit of the system to be receiving cable service without paying for it are at risk of prosecution within the next 30 to 45 days, said David H. Nevins, spokesman for Howard Cable TV.Lawyers for the company will review documentation of cable theft and decide which cases should be forwarded to the Howard County state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
Comcast Cablevision, weary of viewers stealing its signals, is using a new state law to crack down on suspected thieves.Comcast, with 240,000 customers in Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, has turned 75 people over to prosecutors since an amnesty program ended in May. Everyone whose case has come to trial has either pleaded guilty, been convicted or accepted probation before judgment, according to a Comcast spokesman. One defendant was sentenced to a six-month jail term.The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, makes cable fraud easier to prove while making penalties tougher.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | February 12, 1993
Orioles games will be more expensive and less convenient for Baltimore County residents this season -- even if they stay home.Comcast Cablevision of Baltimore County, adopting the practice most area cable companies, has changed the requirements for its 20,000 Home Team Sports subscribers. HTS carries Orioles games and other sports.Starting April 1, Baltimore County subscribers will need an "addressable" converter box to catch HTS. (Addressable boxes are those that can receive pay-per-view or other special programming.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
An outlaw cable guy could spend five years in prison for altering converter boxes to give customers free access to premium cable channels.Gerald D. Kosinski, 45, of the 100 block of Severn Way, Arnold, is scheduled to be sentenced July 25 by Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. on two counts of theft. He could be fined up to $5,000.Kosinski, a former satellite-television-system installer, admitted in court Monday that for a nine-month period ending in December he altered and sold converter boxes at a shop in his home.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
Comcast Cablevision, weary of viewers stealing its signals, i using a new state law to crack down on suspected thieves.Comcast, with 240,000 customers in Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, has turned 75 people over to prosecutors since an amnesty program ended in May. Everyone whose case has come to trial has either pleaded guilty, been convicted or accepted probation before judgment, according to a Comcast spokesman. One defendant was sentenced to a six-month jail term.The new law, which took effect Oct. 1, makes cable fraud easier to prove while making penalties tougher.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Cable thieves, watch out: Comcast Cablevision is coming after you.Comcast, which provides cable service in Baltimore County to 160,000 paying subscribers, claims that there are at least 40,000 other hookups that are illegal. And the company says it isn't going to take it anymore.For six weeks beginning today, Comcast will permit cable thieves to turn themselves in -- no questions asked -- as part of an amnesty program. After that, it's going to be lawsuit time, said Curt Pendleton, general manager for Comcast in Baltimore County.
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