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By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
Comcast Corp.'s cable television customers in Baltimore will continue to face monthly late fees of $5 - the same as customers in virtually every other part of Maryland - because of a state appeals court decision issued yesterday. An earlier ruling by a lower court had limited Comcast, and predecessor United Cable Television of Baltimore Limited Partnership, to a maximum, monthly late-charge assessment of 50 cents per subscriber. In September, however, the Baltimore City Circuit Court granted a company request to set aside that limitation, and lawyers representing cable subscribers appealed the decision to the Court of Special Appeals.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Nearly 17,000 Broadstripe cable TV subscribers could lose channels such as MTV, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, VH1 and BET if the Anne Arundel County cable provider and Viacom fail to reach an agreement by Tuesday. The dispute centers on monthly per-subscriber fees the cable company pays to carry Viacom's 23 networks. Such cutoffs typically are short-lived, lasting until the companies reach agreement. Millersville-based Broadstripe, which serves 16,684 customers in northern Anne Arundel County and part of Baltimore, said Viacom wants to substantially boost fees to renew its contract.
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SPORTS
By Chris Zang and Chris Zang,Evening Sun Staff | August 27, 1991
"The match made in heaven" may have been hell for United Cable subscribers in Baltimore City, but the rest of the World Wrestling Federation's Summer Slam pay-per-view show from Madison Square Garden last night was a winner for the good guys.Hulk Hogan and Ultimate Warrior beat back the challenge of Sgt. Slaughter, Col. Mustafa and Gen. Adnan (with Hulk bringing back guest referee Sid Justice for an ovation).Legion of Doom took the tag team belt away from the Nasty Boys. Big Boss Man sent The Mountie to jail for the night in their law-and-order match.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
The bitter standoff that left cable subscribers in the Midwest and South without the NFL playoffs and American Idol this month could eventually spill into the living rooms of television viewers across the country. It's part of a burgeoning battle between cable operators and broadcasters that's been brewing for 15 years but now faces its biggest test yet. At issue is whether cable operators will pay for something they've always received free: local television news broadcasts and the network affiliations that come with them.
SPORTS
By Chris Zang and Chris Zang,Evening Sun Staff | August 27, 1991
"The match made in heaven" may have been hell for United Cable subscribers in Baltimore City, but the rest of the World Wrestling Federation's Summer Slam pay-per-view show from Madison Square Garden last night was a winner for the good guys.Hulk Hogan and Ultimate Warrior beat back the challenge of Sgt. Slaughter, Col. Mustafa and Gen. Adnan (with Hulk bringing back guest referee Sid Justice for an ovation).Legion of Doom took the tag team belt away from the Nasty Boys. Big Boss Man sent The Mountie to jail for the night in their law-and-order match.
FEATURES
March 29, 1991
A live concert Sunday night featuring singer Whitney Houston welcoming American sailors home from the Persian Gulf can be seen by most cable subscribers, following a decision by the HBO premium service carrying the concert to open its signal to non- subscribers."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1994
Cable subscribers in Baltimore will receive one-time rebates or credits of at least $13 each under a proposal by the Mayor's Office of Cable & Communications.The proposal, to be submitted before the Board of Estimates Wednesday, would compensate subscribers for overcharges by United Artists Cable from Sept. 1, 1993, through July 14, officials said.The total amount of money refunded or credited to subscribers could be more than $1.3 million, they said, based on approximately 97,000 city cable subscribers.
NEWS
By Keith Bradsher and Keith Bradsher,New York Times News Service | February 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Defying both the cable television industry and the Bush administration, the Senate voted yesterday to impose local and federal regulation on cable rates and to force cable companies to pay for broadcasters' programming.Spurred by consumer anger over rising charges and poor service from cable operators, the Senate adopted a bill that would require the Federal Communications Commission to establish national guidelines for basic cable television rates.The FCC would then regulate rates itself or allow local authorities to do so, provided they followed the national guidelines.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 6, 1993
WJZ (Channel 13) made a flurry of 11th-hour deals last night to guarantee that it would stay on all Baltimore-area cable systems for at least 60 days.But subscribers in Cambridge will find that Maryland's most popular TV station and all its ABC programs are missing in action today when they turn on their cable TV.And there's more bad news for cable subscribers in Cambridge: WMAR (Channel 2) and all its NBC programs are going to be missing as well. Marcus Cable in Cambridge said it would pull the plug on WJZ and WMAR as of 12:01 this morning, immediately after the midnight deadline mandated by the Cable TV Act of 1992.
NEWS
December 26, 1990
SUBSCRIBERS LOSE OUT IN NEW CABLE SHUFFLEFrom: Edward Franey Jr.Ellicott CityHoward Cable Television has notified its subscribers of a rate increase effective Jan. 1. This represents a 67 percent increase since 1986. They tout service improvement, but is it?Also, they are adding two new networks as part of the increase. Mr. Tom Beach, general manager, in a letter to his customers contained in the December issue of the Storer Cable Magazine states, "With the additions of these two stellar networks, Howard Cable increases its basic programming lineup offering a total of 34 networks for the basic cable price."
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2007
Thousands of cable customers in the Midwest and South remained without networks such as Fox and ABC yesterday in a dispute that could determine how much consumers pay for local television on cable systems nationwide. Hunt-Valley based Sinclair Broadcast Group pulled 22 local stations it owns from cable systems in several states this weekend after negotiations failed with a New York cable provider on a price to air the local content. Mediacom Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
Sinclair Broadcasting Group is threatening to pull television stations from the air in Iowa and other states because it doesn't think the cable company in those areas is paying it enough, the latest salvo in a burgeoning battle among broadcasters nationwide over transmission fees. Sinclair is at odds with cable system owner Mediacom Communications Corp. over how much airing local stations is worth. Mediacom said late yesterday that it reached an extension with Sinclair to avoid a midnight deadline that would have pulled the stations from cable systems in the Midwest and South.
SPORTS
April 23, 2005
Helton's age, contract make deal a bad idea Laura Vecsey's idea for the Orioles to trade for Colorado Rockies first basemen Todd Helton ["Note to Rockies: Is Helton free?" Tuesday] was a novel idea but also one apparently made by a novice "seamhead." If the Orioles are giving up that kind of talent (Jay Gibbons, Hayden Penn, John Parrish and Nick Markakis), they shouldn't get a player who turns 32 this year and, including this year, has eight years and nearly $120 million left on his contract.
SPORTS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
In a last-minute deal, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said late yesterday that it has agreed in principle with Comcast Corp. to a deal that will enable cable subscribers in Baltimore City and County to watch tomorrow's Super Bowl in vivid, precise, high-definition television. Until last night's agreement, football fans faced the prospect that a fee dispute could cause Fox Baltimore affiliate WBFF/Channel 45 to withhold the high-definition version of its Super Bowl signal from Comcast's cable system.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | May 23, 2004
Cutting household spending is mostly about examining the optional and wasteful expenses in your life. That's why subscription television - cable and satellite - is a good target for savings. TV is certainly optional. And of the scores of channels fed into your home, how many do you actually watch? Research says the typical household regularly tunes in to 17 channels, while many TV packages deliver more than 100. Americans today easily spend $45 a month on cable TV service, according to the Federal Communications Commission.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 24, 2003
John Dunning spends several hours a weekend watching cable, mostly sports. But Dunning, 64, a metallurgist in Corvallis, Ore., says he has begun to think that his bill - $40 a month for about 50 channels - is high. He toyed with switching to satellite, but he receives high-speed Internet access through his cable provider, a service that satellite systems do not offer. And "it is a bit of a hassle to switch," he said. Dunning's attitude may not be unusual among cable subscribers. A recent report by the General Accounting Office shows that the average monthly rate for expanded basic cable service is $36.47.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1996
For cable television subscribers nationwide, 1996 is starting to look a lot like 1986.After a lull in recent years, cable rates are spiking up again -- more sharply than at any time since Congress deregulated the industry in the 1980s. In mail boxes from New York City to Norfolk, Va., and Seattle to Sacramento, Calif., cable subscribers have received the unwelcome news that their monthly bills are going up 5 percent to 20 percent.By June, when Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable operator, implements its across-the-board rate increase of percent, most of America's 63 million cable subscribers will be paying up to $3.50 more a month to watch CNN, MTV and the other channels that are part of basic cable service.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | October 2, 1991
For town governments in Carroll these days, making a decision on thefuture of cable television has become almost as daunting as flippingthrough channels during the height of the new fall season.Three proposals -- one dating back to more than two years ago -- are in front of the seven Carroll municipalities served by Prestige Cable TV ofMaryland Inc.And while none of the proposals would radically change the way Carroll's nearly 19,000 cable subscribers watch the tube, they all havethe potential to alter the amount of money the towns collect from the cable company.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
Comcast Corp.'s cable television customers in Baltimore will continue to face monthly late fees of $5 - the same as customers in virtually every other part of Maryland - because of a state appeals court decision issued yesterday. An earlier ruling by a lower court had limited Comcast, and predecessor United Cable Television of Baltimore Limited Partnership, to a maximum, monthly late-charge assessment of 50 cents per subscriber. In September, however, the Baltimore City Circuit Court granted a company request to set aside that limitation, and lawyers representing cable subscribers appealed the decision to the Court of Special Appeals.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2002
Adelphia Communications overstated both the number of its cable subscribers and its cash flow for 2001, people close to the company said yesterday. The number of cable subscribers has been overstated by at least 4.3 percent and perhaps as much as 10 percent, these people said, although the exact figure is still being determined. The company inflated its estimated $1.55 billion in 2001 cash flow by tens of millions of dollars and possibly by more, they said. The company also overstated its estimated 2001 cash flow - or earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization - by tens of millions through a complex swap transaction on the purchase of digital set-top boxes from Motorola Inc. and Scientific Atlanta Inc., these people said.
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