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By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1993
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Leading members of the cable television industry, voicing fears of being swallowed by the country's telephone companies, yesterday announced a joint venture that would enable the cable companies to compete directly with the phone companies for a variety of local telecommunications services."
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 26, 2014
Marathon Tatyana McFadden to defend crown in Chicago Reigning women's wheelchair champion Tatyana McFadden (Atholton) will defend her title in the Oct. 12 Chicago Marathon, race officials announced. McFadden, 25, became last year the first wheelchair racer to sweep all four major marathons - Boston, London, Chicago and New York. She tried cross-country skiing after last season and won a silver medal at the Sochi Paralympics. Terps Comcast to open cable access for UM games Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | September 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, starting its new term early, stepped yesterday into the midst of the nationwide controversy over cable television companies' right to control the programs that their customers get to see.For the first time in the history of cable TV, the court agreed to spell out the amount of constitutional freedom cable operators have to pick their programming without government controls.At issue, basically, is whether cable TV is to be treated constitutionally like newspapers, free to decide for itself what to publish, or like regular "over-the-air" radio and television, subject to a myriad of government rules on what may be broadcast.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday. Under the deal -- finalized before Maryland enters the Big Ten conference next Tuesday -- Comcast cable subscribers in the principal markets for Maryland and Rutgers will be able to access the network without subscribing to a separate sports tier.   The network is already available to most local Maryland fans, who often pay a fee added to their cable operators' bills for extra sports programming.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
The bitter standoff that left cable subscribers in the Midwest and South without the NFL playoffs and American Idol this month could eventually spill into the living rooms of television viewers across the country. It's part of a burgeoning battle between cable operators and broadcasters that's been brewing for 15 years but now faces its biggest test yet. At issue is whether cable operators will pay for something they've always received free: local television news broadcasts and the network affiliations that come with them.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | March 2, 2007
Some analysts say any deal between Sinclair Broadcast Group and Comcast Corp. to carry networks such as Fox on Comcast's cable systems would likely include cash payments for the television programming in what would mark a major precedent in this growing industry battle over fees. Comcast, the nation's largest cable operator, and Hunt Valley-based Sinclair, one of the country's largest television station owners, extended yesterday their current contract hours before it was set to expire.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
If you ask Jim Cologie what the Next Big Thing in the cable television industry will be, he points to a very old piece of technology: the telephone. Cable operators big and small will begin offering local telephone services bundled with TV programming, and they'll do it sooner rather than later, thanks to the miles of fiber-optic cable being laid coast to coast, he says. "Telephony services are really where the action's going to be," predicts Cologie, president of the Pennsylvania Cable and Telecommunications Association.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Timothy J. Mullaney contributed to this article | April 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A deeply divided Supreme Court upheld yesterday a federal law that forces cable-TV operators to carry all the local TV stations in their areas, undercutting some of cable operators' control of their programming.The 5-4 ruling settles a constitutional controversy that has spanned more than 30 years, testing the government's power to set aside some channels of cable operators for use without charge by competing local broadcasters.With access to wider audiences through cable, local TV stations can attract more advertising and can survive more securely in an era of expanding cable offerings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer Staff writers Eric Siegel, James M. Coram, Amy Miller, Angela Winter Ney and Karin Remesch contributed to this article | April 2, 1993
Cable TV rates are coming down.Maybe. Some of them. A little bit. In some communities. Some day.Cable TV operators and the people who will soon regulate them were busy puzzling out the full impact of yesterday's action by the Federal Communications Commission, which imposed price controls on the industry for the first time since Reagan-era deregulation in 1986.Some local companies were already restructuring their packages yesterday in a way that would minimize their exposure to regulation.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 6, 1993
Today is an important one for cable TV subscribers. It's the deadline for cable operators to inform them which local stations and network shows, like popular sitcoms "Roseanne" and "Seinfeld," they might not see on cable after Oct. 6. This, like the recent rate restructuring, comes courtesy of the 1992 Cable TV Act.And what cable customers are finding out leaves many of them confused and worried.Area cable operators do not yet have permission from the majority of Baltimore and Washington network affiliates to carry their programming.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | July 19, 2007
Not long ago, the cable box we rent from Comcast went on the blink. We called the help line, turned the gadget off, turned it on, re-downloaded its programming, waited for the technician to send a "magic bullet" to resurrect it, then heard it pronounced dead of unknown causes. The next step was relatively easy - I dropped the defunct box off at a Comcast office and picked up a new one. All I had to do was sign a document promising to pay the company several hundred dollars if I abscond with the gadget - which I lease for 12 bucks a month.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | March 10, 2007
Cable customers in the Baltimore region and several other markets can still watch American Idol on their cable system but the battle over how to pay for such programming continued yesterday despite a new four-year agreement between Sinclair Broadcast Group and Comcast Corp. to carry Fox and CW affiliates. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed, but both companies insisted each stood its ground in a growing fight over so-called retransmission fees. The battle garnered nationwide attention because of its potential impact on cable rates and other factors across the television industry.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Millions of cable customers nationwide, including many in the Baltimore region, are waiting to see if popular Fox shows such as American Idol remain on their cable systems as Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. and Comcast Corp. approach tomorrow's deadline to reach a deal on programming costs. Comcast said yesterday that discussions between the two parties remain "productive" and that they are working to reach a "fair agreement that would avoid any interruption in service for our customers."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | March 2, 2007
Some analysts say any deal between Sinclair Broadcast Group and Comcast Corp. to carry networks such as Fox on Comcast's cable systems would likely include cash payments for the television programming in what would mark a major precedent in this growing industry battle over fees. Comcast, the nation's largest cable operator, and Hunt Valley-based Sinclair, one of the country's largest television station owners, extended yesterday their current contract hours before it was set to expire.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2007
To collect cash for its television programming, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. played hardball last month by pulling its stations from cable systems in the Midwest and South and sending a strong message to the industry that its payment demands are serious. The stakes are higher for the Hunt Valley broadcaster in a fight to obtain similar fees from Comcast, the nation's largest cable operator and the biggest player in the Baltimore area. A source familiar with the negotiations said yesterday that Sinclair is prepared to cut off its programming to Comcast systems at 2 a.m. tomorrow because talks between the two sides have stalled.
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | February 2, 2007
CHICAGO -- Comcast Corp. said yesterday that its fourth-quarter profit nearly tripled because of increased demand for its digital video, broadband and phone services, but the company's stock declined on concerns about its spending estimate for this year. Shares of Comcast fell $1.43, or 3.2 percent, to close at $42.92 on strong volume of more than 26.2 million shares. The Philadelphia-based company also said that it would split its stock 3 for 2 on Feb. 21. Comcast, the largest U.S. cable company, said its net income rose to $390 million, or 18 cents a share, from $133 million or 6 cents a share in the year-ago quarter.
NEWS
July 19, 1993
The deal reached between ABC and Continental Cablevision, under which the network agreed to provide its signal free to the cable service in exchange for Cablevision's promise to buy a spinoff of ABC's all-sports channel, is the first breakthrough in a months-long standoff over a new law that gives broadcasters the opportunity to charge cable TV operators for carrying their signal.The law, passed by Congress last year, allows the networks to negotiate a fee with cable operators for the right to carry network programs.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Holding out against fierce lobbying by the cable TV industry, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to cap rates for basic service and set national standards for customer protection.The 280-128 vote exceeded the two-thirds majority needed to override a threatened veto by President Bush (though it was short of the 289 votes needed if the whole House were to vote), but the bill must still clear the Senate, where the outcome is expected to be closer. A Senate vote could come next week.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | February 2, 2007
Comcast Corp. said yesterday that its rights to retransmit signals of Baltimore's Fox and CW networks have been extended for another month while the cable provider continues negotiating with Sinclair Broadcasting Group Inc. on a new deal. Comcast and station owner Sinclair, based in Hunt Valley, agreed to extend their current contract through March 1. It was set to expire Monday. The contract affects regular and high definition channels of 30 stations - including Baltimore's WBFF FOX 45 and WNUV CW 54 - and 3 million customers nationwide in 23 markets such as Richmond Va., Pittsburgh and Tampa, Fla. Cable customers in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties could have lost access to the Fox and CW networks.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
The bitter standoff that left cable subscribers in the Midwest and South without the NFL playoffs and American Idol this month could eventually spill into the living rooms of television viewers across the country. It's part of a burgeoning battle between cable operators and broadcasters that's been brewing for 15 years but now faces its biggest test yet. At issue is whether cable operators will pay for something they've always received free: local television news broadcasts and the network affiliations that come with them.
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