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By Bloomberg Business News | November 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- MCI Communications Corp., Jones Lightwave Inc., Jones Intercable Inc. and Scientific Atlanta Inc. said yesterday that they would offer phone services over cable networks for the first time, beginning in March.The service would initially be offered on a trial basis. If successful, it could mean big savings for MCI and less revenue for the seven regional Bell operating companies.MCI, Jones Lightwave and Jones Intercable plan to use broadband cable television networks to provide phone services in Alexandria, Va., and a Chicago suburb.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. plans to sell two television stations to help the company move ahead with a $1 billion planned purchase of seven ABC affiliates and a Washington-based cable news network. Selling the stations for a combined $97.4 million will allow Sinclair to comply with updated broadcast ownership rules as it aims to win regulatory approval on the purchase from Allbritton Communications by July 27. Sinclair said Monday it expects that deal to close in the third quarter.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
The commercial networks, led by NBC, which announced its fall schedule Monday, aren't the only television operations getting ready for a new season.Cable networks, too, have a bunch of new offerings for the coming months. And with TV writers throughout the country primed to cover the network's fall lineups, is it an accident that some cable operations have chosen now to reveal what the next year has in store?Of course it isn't. Here's a sampling of what the cable folks want us to tell you about.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group's billion-dollar bet on seven ABC affiliates and a regional news network in Washington, D.C., hinges on a plan to transform that network into a national enterprise. Sinclair would use NewsChannel 8 to create a unique hybrid model for cable television news, blending national and international coverage with local news customized for each market. But the channel's success is far from certain, broadcast experts say, and depends on many unknowns, including Sinclair's ability to persuade cable operators to carry the network and the appetite of viewers and advertisers for more news.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994
MTV to test home shoppingMTV Networks said yesterday that it will run a test of home shopping programs on its TV cable networks -- MTV, VH-1 and Nick at Nite.After this spring's test, MTV said, it will consider launching a stand-alone shopping channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 29, 2004
Believe it or not, the infomercial is 20 years old. And how it has grown. Today, the often mocked format is as much a part of the TV landscape as sitcoms and reality shows. And bigger business than ever. The diet aid Herbalife was among the first infomercials to break big during the mid-1980s. Since then, infomercials have created some of the best-known faces in America. Self-help guru Tony Robbins has sold more than $300 million of his products through infomercials. Ali MacGraw and Lisa Hartman opened the way for actors to appear in infomercials when they turned up in a 1989 makeover spot for Victoria Jackson Cosmetics.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | August 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - Define racism. One possible definition can be seen in the media's - and especially the cable news networks' - recent nonstop coverage of the Elizabeth Smart missing person case. Much like Chandra Levy, whose disappearance generated a media feeding frenzy, Miss Smart, the 14-year-old abducted from her Salt Lake City home June 5, comes from affluence, is photogenic, talented ... and white. And therein lies a possible building block of racism. The racism in this case, however, while predicated on skin color, is racism based on demographics, dollar signs and ratings points.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a court decision hailed by cable television officials, a federal judge here has ruled that one of the two principal music-licensing associations cannot demand separate royalties from both cable television networks and individual cable systems.The decision affects tens of millions of dollars in copyright payments for background music for everything from serial comedies to old movies.The decision, issued late last week by U.S. District Court Judge Joyce Hens Green, came after a long-running dispute between the cable industry and Broadcast Music Inc., one of the two main associations that negotiate royalty agreements for the music used on radio and television and in the movies.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Vivendi Universal SA, trying to cut $16 billion of debt, received five offers for its U.S. entertainment assets and may narrow the field of potential buyers starting next week, people familiar with the situation said yesterday. Billionaire Marvin Davis, Edgar Bronfman Jr. and John Malone's Liberty Media Corp. all bid for the Paris-based company's Vivendi Music Group and Vivendi Universal Entertainment, said the people, who asked not to be named. The assets include the Universal film and television studios, the USA and Sci-Fi cable networks and amusement parks.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1992
In a further deregulatory action aimed at helping the shrinking fortunes of the three major television networks, the Federal Communications Commission yesterday unanimously overturned a 22-year prohibition against networks' owning cable TV systems.The 5-0 decision, which followed the FCC's promise last year to conduct a thorough review of decades-old regulations governing television networks and local stations, is designed to give the networks new areas in which to expand in the face of growing competition from cable.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Wednesday it has settled a contract dispute with Time Warner Cable Inc., reaching a multiyear agreement that allows the cable provider to carry signals for 28 Sinclair television stations. That means Time Warner customers in 17 markets from Portland, Maine, to Pensacola, Fla., will have access to network TV stations such as Fox, NBC, CBS and ABC affiliates that might otherwise have gone dark. Time Warner, the second-largest cable operator in the United States, serves customers in 28 states, mainly in New York, the Carolinas, Ohio, Texas and Southern California.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
Dear Michael Steele, Don't do it, Mike! Sorry for the familiarity, but given that you're our former lieut-guv and all, I thought it would be OK. Plus, this is urgent, and there's simply no time for formalities. I saw in the New York Post last week that you're back in the job market, now that the Republican National Committee has shown you the door, and you're already talking to both Fox News and CNN about becoming a paid commentator. No big shock there, given that you were previously a Fox talker and barely broke your media stride during the couple of years that you chaired the RNC. And no surprise because TV is obviously your natural habitat — you look good, you schmooze well and, probably most important in this medium, at any point in time you are likely to say something crazy.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 11, 2010
We all have our favorite ways to escape from the pressures of life. Hobbies serve a grand purpose, focusing all our attention when engaged, and thus erasing for a while the irritations, stresses, disappointments and fears that pile up as we go about living. They're better at that than, say, drinking alcohol, since gardening, woodworking and contract bridge don't cause liver damage and shouldn't hinder ones' ability to drive safely. (As an aside, I get a kick out of the oft-heard plea, "He's really a nice guy when he isn't drunk."
FEATURES
By Lynn Smith | January 1, 2008
A few years ago, it looked like Court TV was all about courtrooms, FX Network was for tough guys, and AMC ran only movies. In the coming months, however, cable TV viewers will start to see things change. Court TV has just become TruTV. FX ads will explain "There is no box" that its shows fit into. And AMC will launch its third original scripted program. As cable TV has exploded into hundreds of channels, networks must grow increasingly sophisticated to stand out amid the competition and maintain their double-digit annual growth.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 2007
NEW YORK -- In the last three years, Josh Bernstein rode horses across the Mongolian steppe with nomads, traveled deep into the Amazon to seek out a remote tribe and slept in an igloo on an Austrian glacier to test the conditions faced by Neolithic cavemen. Now he's venturing into another new territory: the Silver Spring-based Discovery Channel, a television network in the midst of its own evolution. Last week, the cable channel plucked Bernstein away from rival network the History Channel, where he has drawn a following as the host of the popular Digging for the Truth series.
NEWS
By ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS | March 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As Americans watched the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, this year, we enjoyed the acrobatics of world-class athletes. But back in Washington, a supposedly expert government agency was engaged in a less-inspiring kind of acrobatics - a flip-flop that could lead to higher cable television bills for consumers and less opportunity for television programmers. The less-than-elegant back flip was a highly questionable effort by the Federal Communications Commission, which reversed itself in a report that endorses a new federal regulation that would allow cable television viewers to be charged on a per-channel basis.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 17, 1993
New York--If Carl and Debbie Perrone's viewing habits are any indication, television executives had better watch out.The Perrones and their three children participate in a Time Warner Inc. pilot project that offers 150 channels to families in New York City's borough of Queens. Mr. Perrone likes to watch a channel featuring Chinese programming -- even though he doesn't understand the language. And the whole family gathers for recently released movies, which cost $3.95."For a family of five, it's much cheaper than going to the movies," said Mrs. Perrone, who pays $23.95 monthly for a service that includes as many as eight starting times for each of 15 movies.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Wednesday it has settled a contract dispute with Time Warner Cable Inc., reaching a multiyear agreement that allows the cable provider to carry signals for 28 Sinclair television stations. That means Time Warner customers in 17 markets from Portland, Maine, to Pensacola, Fla., will have access to network TV stations such as Fox, NBC, CBS and ABC affiliates that might otherwise have gone dark. Time Warner, the second-largest cable operator in the United States, serves customers in 28 states, mainly in New York, the Carolinas, Ohio, Texas and Southern California.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2006
ELENI VANRODEN made adjustments to the camera while Jennifer Retzlaff reviewed the script for the third time. Stephanie Griffin and Michael O'Donnell sat before a bank of phones, taking in the last few moments of quiet before calls started rolling in. Nearby, Diane McDonnell quietly put the finishing touches on a math lesson she would present on air. I'm scared to death," said McDonnell, who taught middle school math for 13 years in Cecil County....
BUSINESS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
If the Baltimore Orioles and Comcast Corp. cannot work through their legal problems, a regional cable network - thought to be a boon for the club - could be more of a short-term bust, and many baseball fans in the Baltimore-Washington area could lose the opportunity to watch their home teams almost every night. Or, industry analysts say, the standoff could be no more than posturing between giants who realize it's in their mutual best interest to reach a deal. "Obviously, they're both losing money in the short term, but this isn't about losing, it's about winning," Roger Caplan, whose Howard County ad agency places commercials on local sports broadcasts, said yesterday.
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