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BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | April 20, 1997
I have seen the future and it is a cable modem.It sits on the desk next to my PC and connects me to the Internet at warp speed -- the fastest on-line ride I've ever had.Those humongous Web pages full of graphics and animations that once took ages to load are now exploding on the screen. I can click on a link and get real-time video from a computer halfway around the world. Huge files download in a few seconds and gigantic files in a couple of minutes.Best of all, the connection is available 24 hours a day. No hourly charges, no dialing up and no busy signals.
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BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 3, 2006
I work on an IBM PC, and my husband works on a Dell laptop via a wireless Internet connection. Both use a Linksys 2.4 gHz (802.11b) wireless broadband router for Web access. We connect to the Internet via a cable modem, and our Internet service provider is AOL. He has gotten messages that his signal strength is going from good to low to excellent to low, all in a matter of seconds. He is unable to connect to his office e-mail server, download files or navigate through AOL when this is happening.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | April 20, 1997
I have seen the future and it is a cable modem.It sits on the desk next to my PC and connects me to the Internet at warp speed -- the fastest on-line ride I've ever had.Those humongous Web pages full of graphics and animations that once took ages to load are now exploding on the screen. I can click on a link and get real-time video from a computer halfway around the world. Huge files download in a few seconds and gigantic files in a couple of minutes.Best of all, the connection is available 24 hours a day. No hourly charges, no dialing up and no busy signals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 8, 2004
Here's something my 3-year-old daughter Sara will have a hard time remembering when she's in high school: movies recorded on tape and disc for home viewing, bought or rented from stores or delivered by mail. Sara will give me one of those adolescent "Oh, Dad, you dinosaur" looks when I try to tell her that high-definition movies weren't always available on demand through an ultrahigh-speed Internet connection for download in three minutes. Then she'll pop her 1-ounce cell phone into her ear and demand the keys to the family hover-car.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2002
A preliminary decision by federal regulators on cable modem franchise fees could deny local governments millions of dollars in revenue that was used to pay for schools, trash collection and other services. Comcast, the cable giant that serves 800,000 customers in Maryland, told county governments recently that it will no longer collect franchise fees from cable modem customers after a March 14 announcement by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC said the fees were meant to be collected on cable television service, not on information utilities such as cable Internet connections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2000
My apartment building is wired for cable modems. I have been resisting the temptation to connect because of the $39-per-month cost, but I am ready to give in. I called, and was told my computer didn't have enough RAM. If I add memory, will my 1996 Compaq Presario with the Pentium inside be adequate, or is adding memory only the first thing I'll have to do to fulfill the promises of the cable modem? My computer has only a 60-megahertz chip. In theory, your aging Pentium I with its anemic 60-megahertz chip speed should be just fine for access to the Internet via high-speed cable modem once you spend the $100 or so needed to jack up its RAM to handle the networking card and software it needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Akweli Parker and Akweli Parker,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 10, 2002
Many cable modem users accustomed to zipping along the Internet at blazing speeds say that recent changes to Comcast Corp.'s fast Internet service have them puttering in broadband's breakdown lane. Since last month, Comcast has been transferring customers of its cable modem Internet service from the network of a contractor, bankrupt Excite@Home, to Comcast's own routers, servers and fiber-optic lines - a network it built from scratch over the past year. But some users say that after being switched, they have been troubled by drastically slower download speeds, an inability to access Web sites, fewer features and difficulty reaching customer service representatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 8, 2004
Here's something my 3-year-old daughter Sara will have a hard time remembering when she's in high school: movies recorded on tape and disc for home viewing, bought or rented from stores or delivered by mail. Sara will give me one of those adolescent "Oh, Dad, you dinosaur" looks when I try to tell her that high-definition movies weren't always available on demand through an ultrahigh-speed Internet connection for download in three minutes. Then she'll pop her 1-ounce cell phone into her ear and demand the keys to the family hover-car.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Comcast Corp. will set the stage for a high-stakes battle for high-speed Internet access today, as it announces it will offer Internet services that use existing cable systems in Baltimore and Howard counties instead of using phone lines to connect customers to the Net.Comcast said the cable modems to be used with the service are up to 75 times faster at downloading Internet files than the most advanced products from telephone companies such as Bell Atlantic...
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
A change in the way federal officials classify cable modem service could cost Carroll County and its municipalities thousands of dollars a month in franchise fees from Adelphia Cable and send the county into a long legal battle with the cable giant. The Federal Communications Commission decided last month that cable modem services are a form of interstate communications rather than a cable or telecommunications service. With the ruling, modem service no longer falls under Adelphia's franchise agreement with the county, the company's attorneys say. Franchise General Manager Teresa Pickett informed the Carroll Cable Commission of the change in a letter dated April 17. Carroll officials, however, say their contract protects the county from losing money because of such a decision, and they promise to fight Adelphia, in court if necessary, to get the full revenue expected from the contract.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
A change in the way federal officials classify cable modem service could cost Carroll County and its municipalities thousands of dollars a month in franchise fees from Adelphia Cable and send the county into a long legal battle with the cable giant. The Federal Communications Commission decided last month that cable modem services are a form of interstate communications rather than a cable or telecommunications service. With the ruling, modem service no longer falls under Adelphia's franchise agreement with the county, the company's attorneys say. Franchise General Manager Teresa Pickett informed the Carroll Cable Commission of the change in a letter dated April 17. Carroll officials, however, say their contract protects the county from losing money because of such a decision, and they promise to fight Adelphia, in court if necessary, to get the full revenue expected from the contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 2002
Watching movies delivered legally through the Internet to your personal computer is an idea who's time may never come, but Hollywood is finally getting serious about it. CinemaNow and Intertainer, two online movie services, are just now providing access to major studio releases, moving beyond their extensive libraries of Grade Z direct-to-video flops. I tried both and found huge technical improvements over my first experience back in January 2001. If you have a fast and reliable Internet connection, such as a cable modem or DSL line, CinemaNow and Intertainer mostly provide video quality that's almost comparable to broadcast television - a huge achievement considering how much compression is required.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2002
A preliminary decision by federal regulators on cable modem franchise fees could deny local governments millions of dollars in revenue that was used to pay for schools, trash collection and other services. Comcast, the cable giant that serves 800,000 customers in Maryland, told county governments recently that it will no longer collect franchise fees from cable modem customers after a March 14 announcement by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC said the fees were meant to be collected on cable television service, not on information utilities such as cable Internet connections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
In a world where viruses and stealth programs abound, protecting your computer from nasty bugs that float around the Internet and hackers on the prowl couldn't be more important. A virus will crash an evening of writing letters or playing games faster than you can call for help. And hackers can turn your PC into an electronic "zombie" that silently attacks other computers on the Internet by flooding them with bogus traffic until they shut down. No one need go without protection because solutions abound - programs that will not only protect you from viruses and hackers but also shield your privacy on the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Akweli Parker and Akweli Parker,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 10, 2002
Many cable modem users accustomed to zipping along the Internet at blazing speeds say that recent changes to Comcast Corp.'s fast Internet service have them puttering in broadband's breakdown lane. Since last month, Comcast has been transferring customers of its cable modem Internet service from the network of a contractor, bankrupt Excite@Home, to Comcast's own routers, servers and fiber-optic lines - a network it built from scratch over the past year. But some users say that after being switched, they have been troubled by drastically slower download speeds, an inability to access Web sites, fewer features and difficulty reaching customer service representatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL JAMES | December 25, 2000
I admit it - I like to figure out how to make gadgets work. It's like a puzzle coming together, or a game that challenges me to beat the odds. So I took on the most elaborate networking project we tried. I had no previous networking experience, and I had to figure out what a "router" was, how a "phone line bridge" worked, and what "frequency hopping spread spectrum" meant. You don't necessarily have to do that - it's just that I like to tweak things to the max. It took me 25 hours over two weeks to get everything working just right.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Bell Atlantic Corp. will unveil its long-awaited high-speed Internet service in mid-1998, the company said yesterday, upping the ante in what is expected to be a high-stakes dogfight with cable television providers over who will control the on-ramp to the information superhighway.The new system, dubbed ADSL as shorthand for Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line, can download data at speeds of up to 6 million bits of information per second, or more than 100 times as fast as a conventional phone line equipped with a 56K analog modem, the current state of the art. It is also far faster than Bell Atlantic's current high-speed offering, the ISDN or Integrated Service Digital Network line, which runs at up to 128,000 bits per second.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 2002
Watching movies delivered legally through the Internet to your personal computer is an idea who's time may never come, but Hollywood is finally getting serious about it. CinemaNow and Intertainer, two online movie services, are just now providing access to major studio releases, moving beyond their extensive libraries of Grade Z direct-to-video flops. I tried both and found huge technical improvements over my first experience back in January 2001. If you have a fast and reliable Internet connection, such as a cable modem or DSL line, CinemaNow and Intertainer mostly provide video quality that's almost comparable to broadcast television - a huge achievement considering how much compression is required.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | April 17, 2000
I just installed Windows 98 and Windows shuts down fine, but on rebooting I am forced to get back via the ScanDisk route. Is there a fix for this? A component of Windows 98 called the Scheduled Tasks Agent has been set to run ScanDisk every time you turn on your PC. ScanDisk checks the physical surface of the hard drive and the way each bit of data is stored to ensure that everything is OK. The culprit is a bad setting you can change. Click on Start, then Programs and Accessories and System Tools.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2000
My apartment building is wired for cable modems. I have been resisting the temptation to connect because of the $39-per-month cost, but I am ready to give in. I called, and was told my computer didn't have enough RAM. If I add memory, will my 1996 Compaq Presario with the Pentium inside be adequate, or is adding memory only the first thing I'll have to do to fulfill the promises of the cable modem? My computer has only a 60-megahertz chip. In theory, your aging Pentium I with its anemic 60-megahertz chip speed should be just fine for access to the Internet via high-speed cable modem once you spend the $100 or so needed to jack up its RAM to handle the networking card and software it needs.
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