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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
If you look like a duck and walk like a duck and quack like a duck, look out. You're going to end up being regulated by the State Duck Commission.That was the gist of a decision handed down Thursday by the Public Service Commission of Maryland, dismaying cable television operators.The PSC told the state's cable television operators that if they decide to waddle into Bell Atlantic's duck pond, they're going to have to play by the same rules -- and that means answering to the regulators.With the age of local telephone monopolies fading into history, cable television companies have been eagerly contemplating the prospect of using their miles of coaxial cable to bring telephone and interactive multimedia services into U.S. homes.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 3, 2007
In this space, I've been given permission to vent a bit. You know, pick a topic or two and proffer a considered opinion - or let loose with an irrational rant. But I'm grateful for the opportunity, and in the spirit of our patron saint, H.L. Mencken, who exhorted those in the Fourth Estate to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable, I'm going to rail against two heavyweights - the NFL and the cable industry. The 11-0 New England Patriots are in town tonight, Baltimore being their latest whistlestop en route to potential NFL immortality.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
"All we need is a little help . . . you know, shoot Hundt! Don't let him do more damage."--John MaloneIf you want to understand why the cable television industry is in the regulatory doghouse, catch the interview of Tele-Communications Inc. President John Malone's interview in Wired magazine's July issue -- the one where he suggests shooting Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt.It's a wonderful interview. Mr. Malone comes across as outspoken, intelligent, humorous and totally contemptuous of just about anyone and anything except John Malone.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In the face of a lobbying blitzkrieg by the cable television industry, the head of the Federal Communications Commission said yesterday evening that he had scaled back his proposal to more tightly regulate the industry to salvage the effort. The chairman, Kevin J. Martin, and some consumer groups said the agreement could help to make programming more diverse and ultimately reduce cable costs. The compromise was a significant, though not total, victory for the cable industry, whose executives and lobbyists had worked to erode support on the commission for Martin's agenda.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | November 28, 1993
I'd be lying if I said I wasn't gloating over recent attempts to crack down on Howard County cable franchises.Could there be a more universally despised segment of society than cable television companies (except perhaps for attorneys, politicians and journalists)? As one villain to another, it's good to see cable taking some of the heat.Now that Congress has given us the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act, Howard County officials are about to wade in with a bill that would require franchise holders to provide more efficient service.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
CARMICHAEL -- Francis J. Knott and Wayne O'Dell haven't even met, but their relationship is already dysfunctional.Mr. Knott, Gov. William Donald Schaefer's chief adviser on telecommunications policy, lashed out this weekend at Mr. O'Dell, a spokesman for the cable TV industry. Mr. Knott spoke after Mr. O'Dell stepped up his accusations that the Schaefer administration is promoting the interests of C&P Telephone Co. of Maryland behind closed doors at the cable industry's expense."I am sick of hearing about Wayne O'Dell," Mr. Knott exploded after he was asked about Mr. O'Dell's complaints that the cable TV industry had been excluded from meetings of the Governor's Information Technology Board Friday and yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Timothy J. Mullaney contributed to this article | April 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A deeply divided Supreme Court upheld yesterday a federal law that forces cable-TV operators to carry all the local TV stations in their areas, undercutting some of cable operators' control of their programming.The 5-4 ruling settles a constitutional controversy that has spanned more than 30 years, testing the government's power to set aside some channels of cable operators for use without charge by competing local broadcasters.With access to wider audiences through cable, local TV stations can attract more advertising and can survive more securely in an era of expanding cable offerings.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
If you ask Jim Cologie what the Next Big Thing in the cable television industry will be, he points to a very old piece of technology: the telephone. Cable operators big and small will begin offering local telephone services bundled with TV programming, and they'll do it sooner rather than later, thanks to the miles of fiber-optic cable being laid coast to coast, he says. "Telephony services are really where the action's going to be," predicts Cologie, president of the Pennsylvania Cable and Telecommunications Association.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2007
William W. Garretson, a retired wire and cable industry executive, died of lung cancer Thursday at Bay Woods retirement community in Annapolis. He was 75. Born near the water in Perth Amboy, N.J., he developed a love of racing and building boats as a boy. He attended public schools in New Jersey and went on to earn an undergraduate degree in economics from Lafayette College in 1953. After graduation, he served in the Army for three years with the 82nd Airborne Division, where he was a lieutenant.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | February 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Changes in the telephone and cable television industries are gaining a critical momentum that could soon see the two businesses offering consumers everything from ordinary telephone services to dial-up football games.The rate of change quickened Tuesday when the Southwestern Bell Corp. announced it was buying two Washington-area cable television systems. For the first time, a telephone company will be operatinga television company, a move that analysts believe will hasten the union of industries.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to impose significant new regulations to open the cable television market to independent programmers and rival video services after determining that cable companies have become too dominant in the industry, senior commission officials said. The finding, under a law that gives the commission expanded powers over the cable television industry if it becomes too big, is expected to be announced this month. It is a major departure for the agency and the industry, which was deregulated by an act of Congress in 1996.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission, in an effort to reduce the spiraling costs of cable television, is preparing to strike down thousands of contracts this week that shut out competitors by giving individual cable companies exclusive rights to provide service to an apartment building, the agency's chairman said. The new rule could open markets across the country to competition. It would be a huge victory for Verizon Communications and AT&T, which have challenged the cable industry by offering their own video services.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 9, 2007
LAS VEGAS -- The next generation of Internet cable modems will let users download a full set of encyclopedias in a few minutes, transfer 75 songs or thousands of photos in a few seconds, or download TV shows and movies in a fraction of the time it takes today. Brian L. Roberts, Comcast Corp.'s chairman and chief executive, predicted yesterday that the new devices will once again revolutionize the television and technology businesses. In the first public demonstration of "wideband" cable modems, Roberts' prototype hit data transfer rates of about 150 megabits per second.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2007
William W. Garretson, a retired wire and cable industry executive, died of lung cancer Thursday at Bay Woods retirement community in Annapolis. He was 75. Born near the water in Perth Amboy, N.J., he developed a love of racing and building boats as a boy. He attended public schools in New Jersey and went on to earn an undergraduate degree in economics from Lafayette College in 1953. After graduation, he served in the Army for three years with the 82nd Airborne Division, where he was a lieutenant.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN. and JON VAN.,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 10, 2006
Most cable TV customers would save money if allowed to pay for only the channels they want to watch, a report from the Federal Communications Commission concluded yesterday, reversing an earlier finding that so-called "a la carte" programming would raise cable bills. The report set off howls of protest from the cable industry, praise from consumer advocates and mixed reactions from special-interest groups trying to calculate whether mandated channel choice would help or hurt their causes.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 22, 2005
If you watch cable TV, during the next few months, you'll get a notice from your cable company offering a new, "family-friendly" package of channels at a fixed price. By that, the industry means channels that deliver less sex, violence and foul language than today's standard channel bundles. There's nothing wrong with this - in fact, it's a great idea. The problem: Most parents don't really need it. And they ought to think twice before they subscribe to whatever new Pablum Network the cable companies create.
NEWS
By Keith Bradsher and Keith Bradsher,New York Times News Service | February 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Defying both the cable television industry and the Bush administration, the Senate voted yesterday to impose local and federal regulation on cable rates and to force cable companies to pay for broadcasters' programming.Spurred by consumer anger over rising charges and poor service from cable operators, the Senate adopted a bill that would require the Federal Communications Commission to establish national guidelines for basic cable television rates.The FCC would then regulate rates itself or allow local authorities to do so, provided they followed the national guidelines.
NEWS
By Roll Call Report Syndicate | February 2, 1992
Here is how Maryland's senators were recorded on important roll-call votes last week. There were no House votes:Y: YES N: NO X: NOT VOTINGSENATE: TO REGULATE CABLEBy a vote of 73-18, the Senate passed a bill (S 12) requiring the Federal Communications Commission to begin full-scale regulation of cable television, including rate control.The bill, awaiting House action, is backed by commercial broadcasters and the consumer lobby and opposed by the cable industry.A yes vote was to pass the bill.
NEWS
By RICHARD J. DALTON JR. and RICHARD J. DALTON JR.,NEWSDAY | December 13, 2005
Bowing to government pressure, cable companies serving the majority of U.S. subscribers plan to offer family-oriented packages, industry executives said yesterday. Time Warner Cable, Comcast and several other cable networks accounting for 56 percent of subscribers will offer the option, said Paul Rodriguez, spokesman for the National Cable and Telecommunications Association. The president and chief executive of the trade group, Kyle McSlarrow, discussed family programming yesterday with the Senate Commerce Committee at a meeting on decency in programming.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2005
In a decision likely to limit consumer choice in the rapidly growing market for high-speed Internet access, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that cable companies were not required to give competitors access to their broadband networks. The decision was seen as a victory for cable giants, such as Comcast Corp., and the Federal Communications Commission as well as the one-time Bell operating companies - including Verizon Communications Corp. and SBC Communications Inc. - which are seeking a similar exemption.
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