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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Greg Tasker and Amy L. Miller and Greg Tasker,Staff writers | March 15, 1992
Dissatisfied with ever-rising cable television bills, Carroll's cable committee is recommending the county and its municipalities consider opening the door for competition.The committee, made up of county and municipal representatives and citizens, voted unanimously to recommend seeking bids for a franchise agreement with a second cable television company."At this point, we're recommending the towns and the county let us proceed (with the bidding process)," said Howard "Buddy" Redman, the committee's chair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
If the new Fox drama “Gracepoint” looks too good to be on network TV, that's because it's stacked with the kind of talent you normally see only on cable. And the work here is so good it could help change the way networks do drama in the future. Starring in the series about life in a small Northern California coastal community after the murder of a 12-year-old boy are David Tennant (“Broadchurch”) and recent Emmy winner Anna Gunn (“Breaking Bad”). Gunn is outstanding as a police detective who has lived in the town her whole life, but only now starts to plumb the depths of lies, secrets and evil beneath the surface.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Cable television companies that place "temporary" cables above ground after repairs or new installations now face civil fines if they don't return to bury the wires within 15 business days. The Howard County Council unanimously approved that bill, also backed by County Executive Ken Ulman, at a Monday night session. Action was postponed on two other bills to rezone Columbia's town center, and new council leaders were chosen for the next year. Ellicott City Democrat Courtney Watson was chosen by the four council Democrats to serve as chairwoman for the next year, replacing Mary Kay Sigaty, a West Columbia Democrat, who moves to vice chairwoman.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
About 30,000 low-income Marylanders, half of them in the Baltimore region, have signed up for $10-a-month Internet service, Comcast officials said Monday as they promoted broadened access to the program, now in its fourth year. The Philadelphia-based cable service provider revealed the figures at an event at Baltimore's Digital Harbor Foundation, an after-school program it is working with to help close the digital divide. Comcast is giving the foundation free Internet service and donated more than 50 laptops to students at the event, attended by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
June 9, 1995
The confusion of City Council President Mary Pat Clarke about how to increase cable television competition is indefensible but understandable. The development of technology has been so rapid in recent years that the very nature of the cable industry has changed. With wired and wireless telephone companies poised to become program distributors, cable television faces intense competition from all directions.None of this was predictable in the 1960s and 1970s, when what had started as community antenna television in Pennsylvania mountain hamlets to pull in faraway stations was introduced as an alternative for regular television broadcasting.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
A proposal to tax cable television in Baltimore has been yanked by its sponsor after city attorneys determined that federal law would prohibit such a fee. Councilman James B. Kraft said he decided to shelve the bill and cancel a Thursday afternoon hearing after the city solicitor's office ruled that the city does not have the authority to impose the $4 monthly telecommunications tax on cable service. Kraft had estimated that the tax could generate as much as $10 million in revenue.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
So patent application stories are always a bit dicey, no one knows if the company is actually going to follow through. But occasionally something so creepy comes along that the usual patent application caveats are thrown out the window. Verizon has filed a patent to that takes the tech behind the Xbox Kinect and others like it a skeevy step further. Instead of helping you rock out to that Zumba routine, the cameras and mics connected to this invention could record could what's happening in a living room and program ads accordingly.
FEATURES
December 2, 1997
If you are a TCI Cable customer in Baltimore City who was confused when you turned on your television yesterday morning, you're not alone.As of yesterday, TCI has rearranged its channels. No channels have been removed, however, said TCI customer service representative Dana Holt.The change is a step toward eliminating cable boxes and creating cable-ready television, Holt said.TCI customers were alerted to the changes through television commercials and inserts in their November cable bills, Holt said.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
ON March 29, 2005, ALBERT R. CABLE, age 97, a WWII Veteran, beloved husband of the late Louise E. (nee Rost) Cable; uncle of Dolores Voosen of Canoga Park, CA, Gerard Wicklin of Maitland, FL, and Eugene Wicklin of Baltimore, MD. Friends may call at the family owned LEONARD J. RUCK INC., FUNERAL HOME, 5305 Harford Rd (at Echodale) Monday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., where Funeral Services will be held Tuesday at 10 A.M. Interment Druid Ridge Cemetery.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 27, 1994
THE INFORMATION superhighway may be the next objective in American technology, but the first major milestone in that long road was even harder to accomplish -- namely, the trans-Atlantic cable, successfully completed 128 years ago today.Perhaps no technological triumph contributed as much to the easing of diplomatic relations as well as the bridging of the North American and European continents.Unlike the cable between Britain and France, completed in 1845, the trans-Atlantic line illustrated innumerable snafus before its completion; most of all, it illustrated the cooperation of governments and businessmen on both sides of the Atlantic.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 1, 2014
If you are looking for me, I will be binge-watching English mysteries. Miss Marple, Poirot, Midsomer Murders, Endeavour, Inspector Morse. If someone is murdered in England, I am there. There is nothing more soothing than the breezy, blossomy English countryside, with its meadows and its stone-walled gardens and its cozy little cottages and its drafty old manor houses. The title characters are always dropping into a pub for a pint in the middle of a work day. It's enough to make you like Guinness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
I only have 2 million other better things to write about. But after 24 hours of waiting for someone else to unload on Sean Hannity, the Fox News host who defines political stooge, I have to say something. I held off when this GOP tool ran around on the Texas border in sunglasses and a baseball hat on backwards with Gov. Rick Perry. I even ignored the picture Hannity tweeted of him with his arm over a machine gun as he posed in a boat on the Rio Grande alongside Perry -- who we now know is really an intellectual giant because he has glasses with thick rims.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
On Wednesday, Baltimore will relaunch its publicly owned TV station, shifting its focus from broadcasts of government meetings to CharmTV, a showcase for city restaurants, businesses and neighborhoods. City leaders see an opportunity to counteract negative perceptions of Baltimore, but with the change come questions about significantly increased spending on an untested business model - without benefit of data to show how many people watch the station. An extensive publicity campaign from the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications promises a fresh slate of four locally produced prime-time programs equal in quality to those seen on the Food Network or HGTV, showcasing "all that is proud, inspiring and authentic" about Baltimore food, nightlife, neighborhoods and history.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. plans to sell two television stations to help the company move ahead with a $1 billion planned purchase of seven ABC affiliates and a Washington-based cable news network. Selling the stations for a combined $97.4 million will allow Sinclair to comply with updated broadcast ownership rules as it aims to win regulatory approval on the purchase from Allbritton Communications by July 27. Sinclair said Monday it expects that deal to close in the third quarter.
NEWS
By Daniel Lyons | June 10, 2014
The cable company is one entity everyone likes to hate. Perhaps this knee-jerk animosity is to blame for the rush to condemn Comcast's proposed $44 billion merger with Time Warner Cable. Critics complain that combining the nation's two largest cable companies would create a "behemoth" with 30 million customers, nearly one-third the cable/satellite market. But calling this a "cable deal" misunderstands the dynamic nature of the modern video marketplace. America is in the midst of an entertainment revolution, giving consumers more choices than ever.
FEATURES
November 29, 1990
Here are some interesting numbers involving Baltimore's United Cable system:* By year's end, the company hopes to reach or at least come close to the 100,000-subscriber level. Yet by the end of 1991, that level is projected to grow just to 110,000. By the time the system reaches "maturity" in five years, the projection is for only 130,000 subscribers. (There are a little less than 300,000 residences in the city.)* Now, a little more than one in every three residences gaining access to cable subscribes.
FEATURES
January 26, 2002
Beginning today, Comcast will add two new channels - the Golf Channel and Bravo - to its expanded basic cable package in Baltimore City. To do this, Comcast is juggling its channels into what it calls "interest groupings for easier viewing." Some of those renumbered channels are ESPN, on 9, USA, on 11, and WBFF-45 (Fox), on 15. The Golf Channel is at 63 and Bravo is at 50. For other changes, consult listings channels, or see the new lineup at www.comcast.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
It was almost like old times last week watching CNN's wall-to-wall coverage of the Veterans Affairs scandal story. I mean the good old times, when cable TV news mattered because it was doing journalism - not right- or left-wing talking points as Fox News and MSNBC do, and not whatever it was that CNN was doing in its weird obsession with Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in recent months. And it made a real difference. CNN's investigative reporting by Drew Griffin, coupled with hard-hitting interviews like one anchor Jake Tapper did with White House chief of staff Dennis McDonough, forced the White House to pay attention to the medical plight of veterans in a way it had not come close to doing in the first six years of the Obama administration.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 3, 2014
Larry Hogan became the first Republican candidate for governor to run ads on television Thursday as his campaign released a 30-second spot that is running on cable channels in the Baltimore market. The Hogan ad, which comes 2 1/2 months before the June 24 primary, continues Hogan's theme of his determination to "Change Maryland" -- the name of the conservative advocacy group he founded three years ago.  Hogan, a former Ehrlich administration official, makes the case that he can do that because he is not a career politician.
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