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Cabinet Meeting

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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Braced for what could be the most embarrassing day of his presidency as a report alleging impeachable offenses is made public, President Clinton struggled yesterday to make amends with fellow Democrats whose support will be vital to his political survival.In yet another round of apologies and mea culpas, Clinton expressed regret for his actions in the Monica Lewinsky scandal to Senate Democrats in the morning and to his Cabinet in the late afternoon.The later meeting was described by James Lee Witt, chief of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as a "very emotional, very tough" exchange as Clinton met for more than an hour with members of his Cabinet for the first time since just after the Lewinsky scandal broke.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Cabinet closeted themselves with former Gov. Parris N. Glendening and out-of-state planning experts yesterday to hash over ways to reinvigorate Smart Growth, the state's decade-old sprawl-fighting effort that some say has failed to live up to its promise. "The public is crying out for this," O'Malley said in opening the two-day internal workshop on growth management at an Annapolis hotel. Though welcoming up to 60,000 new jobs to the state from military base realignment, the governor said Maryland needs to figure out how to accommodate the new people while still preserving its environment and quality of life.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | January 19, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley's first full day in office began with a Cabinet meeting just hours after inaugural festivities ended and concluded with a birthday celebration with his family. 8 a.m. - Held a Cabinet meeting in the ceremonial reception room, where he was briefed on details of state government, such as how the highways are plowed during snowstorms. 9 a.m. - Briefed legislators on his $30 billion budget proposal. 11 a.m. - Left for Baltimore, where he watched Sheila Dixon be sworn in as mayor.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 27, 2007
The governor and his top officials travel to Salisbury for a Cabinet meeting, and do you think his political foes offer an attaboy for schlepping all that way, for reaching out to the lower Eastern Shore? No, the opposing party calls it a "fake" Cabinet meeting, one that, by wasting taxpayers' money, was actually "defrauding the working families of Maryland." "They bring in legions of state government staffers and cabinet officials, sacrificing a day of work for a day of shameless self promotion," says the news release from the Maryland DEMOCRATIC Party.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 4, 1994
JERUSALEM -- As hundreds of angry Jews clashed with police outside his office yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin defended the Mideast peace accord and accused his opponents of inciting violence with scare stories of a Palestinian-controlled Jerusalem."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley and his top officials traded a wood-paneled conference room in City Hall for one of Baltimore's worst drug corners yesterday, holding a Cabinet meeting on a vacant lot to symbolize a city taking its streets back from crime. Under a blue tent pitched at North Avenue and Rosedale Street in West Baltimore, O'Malley and his aides met for about an hour, shivering in winter coats and raising their voices at times to be heard over rumbling buses and trucks. They got an update on the Human Services Commission's activities, heard the latest crime figures, were briefed on an energy assistance program and Earned Income Tax Credits, and learned that crews were ready to salt roads if it snows.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 27, 2007
The governor and his top officials travel to Salisbury for a Cabinet meeting, and do you think his political foes offer an attaboy for schlepping all that way, for reaching out to the lower Eastern Shore? No, the opposing party calls it a "fake" Cabinet meeting, one that, by wasting taxpayers' money, was actually "defrauding the working families of Maryland." "They bring in legions of state government staffers and cabinet officials, sacrificing a day of work for a day of shameless self promotion," says the news release from the Maryland DEMOCRATIC Party.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
In their first meeting since last week's inauguration, Gov. Parris N. Glendening told Mayor Martin O'Malley that he will provide an infusion of new funds for Baltimore to help pay for beefed-up crime fighting and to put new technology in the local classrooms. Glendening said they did not discuss specific dollar amounts but that he and the mayor share the same priorities for aid to the city. "It was a very good meeting," Glendening said. "His enthusiasm level is tremendous.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Staff shortages, increased work and persistent demand for services are taking such a toll on Carroll County government employees that the director of management and budget has organized a committee to look at long-range hiring and service needs. "We are asking agencies to provide information on what they need to provide the same level of services over the next six years," said Ted Zaleski, budget director, at a commissioners' Cabinet meeting last week. "We have to decide to provide the people or change the level of service, and we have to understand the consequences.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Staff shortages, increased work and persistent demand for services are taking such a toll on Carroll County government employees that the director of management and budget has organized a committee to look at long-range hiring and service needs. "We are asking agencies to provide information on what they need to provide the same level of services over the next six years," said Ted Zaleski, budget director, at a commissioners' Cabinet meeting last week. "We have to decide to provide the people or change the level of service, and we have to understand the consequences.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | January 19, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley's first full day in office began with a Cabinet meeting just hours after inaugural festivities ended and concluded with a birthday celebration with his family. 8 a.m. - Held a Cabinet meeting in the ceremonial reception room, where he was briefed on details of state government, such as how the highways are plowed during snowstorms. 9 a.m. - Briefed legislators on his $30 billion budget proposal. 11 a.m. - Left for Baltimore, where he watched Sheila Dixon be sworn in as mayor.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Staff shortages, increased work and persistent demand for services are taking such a toll on Carroll County government employees that the director of management and budget has organized a committee to look at long-range hiring and service needs. "We are asking agencies to provide information on what they need to provide the same level of services over the next six years," said Ted Zaleski, budget director, at a commissioners' Cabinet meeting last week. "We have to decide to provide the people or change the level of service, and we have to understand the consequences.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Staff shortages, increased work and persistent demand for services are taking such a toll on Carroll County government employees that the director of management and budget has organized a committee to look at long-range hiring and service needs. "We are asking agencies to provide information on what they need to provide the same level of services over the next six years," said Ted Zaleski, budget director, at a commissioners' Cabinet meeting last week. "We have to decide to provide the people or change the level of service, and we have to understand the consequences.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - The atrium at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center where the late president's former staffers gathered for a reunion was decorated with huge photographs, towering blow-ups that celebrated the crowd's larger-than-life hero. But another view of Ronald Reagan emerged there yesterday, a more intimate one, as former aides shared memories of the man himself rather than the icon that has been on public display all week. From the stage, more than a dozen one-time Reagan advisers traded stories of the old days in a simulated "Cabinet meeting."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2003
With the United States moving closer to war with Iraq, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. met with his Cabinet yesterday afternoon at the Maryland Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Reisterstown to go over scenarios for responding to a terrorist attack. The meeting, at the Camp Fretterd Military Reservation, was scheduled two weeks ago to ensure that all state agencies, from Aging to Veterans Affairs, know what steps to take in case of a crisis, Ehrlich said. But it came on the day President Bush told Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to leave his country or face a U.S.-led invasion.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley and his top officials traded a wood-paneled conference room in City Hall for one of Baltimore's worst drug corners yesterday, holding a Cabinet meeting on a vacant lot to symbolize a city taking its streets back from crime. Under a blue tent pitched at North Avenue and Rosedale Street in West Baltimore, O'Malley and his aides met for about an hour, shivering in winter coats and raising their voices at times to be heard over rumbling buses and trucks. They got an update on the Human Services Commission's activities, heard the latest crime figures, were briefed on an energy assistance program and Earned Income Tax Credits, and learned that crews were ready to salt roads if it snows.
NEWS
December 20, 1990
Excerpts from the news conference at which the mayor announced he has asked the board not to renew the superintendent's contract:I asked Dr. Hunter to meet with the principals individually. He has not done that. Dr. Andrews [Dr. J. Edward Andrews, the deputy superintendent] has, and there have been improvements a result.I asked for a vocational education action plan from Dr. Hunter. I didn't get one. The members of the board had to push for it. That shouldn't be their role. The board should set broad policy.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - The atrium at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center where the late president's former staffers gathered for a reunion was decorated with huge photographs, towering blow-ups that celebrated the crowd's larger-than-life hero. But another view of Ronald Reagan emerged there yesterday, a more intimate one, as former aides shared memories of the man himself rather than the icon that has been on public display all week. From the stage, more than a dozen one-time Reagan advisers traded stories of the old days in a simulated "Cabinet meeting."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2000
Mayor Martin O'Malley brings his Cabinet to order, gently tapping his pen against the wooden conference table. The police commissioner, the public works director and 10 other city agency heads line the rectangular conference-room table behind the locked doors of the mayor's second-floor City Hall offices. The front line is flanked by a second row of aides and secretaries, who sit with their backs to the wall, pen and paper in hand, waiting for an edict to tumble from the mayor's mouth.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
In their first meeting since last week's inauguration, Gov. Parris N. Glendening told Mayor Martin O'Malley that he will provide an infusion of new funds for Baltimore to help pay for beefed-up crime fighting and to put new technology in the local classrooms. Glendening said they did not discuss specific dollar amounts but that he and the mayor share the same priorities for aid to the city. "It was a very good meeting," Glendening said. "His enthusiasm level is tremendous.
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