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Cabin Boy

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 8, 1994
Let me tell you, "Cabin Boy" makes "Wayne's World 2" look like Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason."I thought Jerry Lewis had retired the Oscar category of "Most Irritating Performance by a Minor Comedian," but Chris Elliott must not have gotten the word. He's out to cop the trophy for all time. When he's done you won't even remember "The Nutty Professor."Elliott will be familiar to early "Late Night With David Letterman" fans; on that show, in the mid-'80s, he etched a small post-midnight persona based on blithe stupidity combined with infantile hostility, mostly built around resentment of Letterman's success.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 9, 2011
Cecil George Mateer, a retired machinist and Royal Navy veteran, died July 28 of pneumonia at Lorien of Bel Air. He was 90. Born and raised in Belfast, Ireland, Mr. Mateer ran away to the sea when he was 13, and served onboard windjammers as a cabin boy. He later was trained as a machinist and joined the British merchant service, working passenger liners. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Royal Navy and served at sea and on land bases at Sierra Leone and Cairo.
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May 10, 1993
MATTHEW BOOZ, 10, son of David and Barbara Booz of Scott Drive in Westminster.School: Fifth-grader at William Winchester Elementary School.Honored for: Matthew had one of the main roles in the fifth-grade musical, "In Quest of Columbus," last week. He played a cabin boy on one of Christopher Columbus' ships and sang a duet, "La Navidad," with another cabin boy.Goals: To become either a math teacher or an author.Comments: "I think it's a fun part," he said of the cabin boy role. He also has enjoyed his other musical activities, such as singing in the Carroll County Children's Choir, taking piano lessons and playing trombone in the school band.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1996
ABC tonight offers what may be the closest view yet of what it's like to live on death row."Morgan State Choir: A Silver Celebration" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This commemoration of 25 years under the guidance of director Nathan Carter concludes with a stirring rendition of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony."PrimeTime Live" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Cynthia McFadden follows death-row inmate Antonio James, convicted in 1979 of two murders in New Orleans, to the moment he was executed in March 1996 by lethal injection.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 27, 1993
/TC Long before Hollywood brought its infamous rogue of the sea to life, 18th-century Colonial American artist John Singleton Copley painted his own captivating version of a terrifying shark attack.Copley's depiction of the rescue of a young cabin boy from shark-infested waters received high praise for its power and realism from the London press and public in 1778, and earned the artist a lasting reputation."Watson and the Shark" is now the centerpiece of an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington that looks at the story behind the work and how Copley created the masterpiece.
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By Lewis Beale and Lewis Beale,New York Daily News | January 26, 1994
Chris Elliott says he doesn't mind if you call his brand of comedy "stupid." The pratfalls, the non sequiturs, the general air dweebiness -- it's all part of his shtick."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 9, 2011
Cecil George Mateer, a retired machinist and Royal Navy veteran, died July 28 of pneumonia at Lorien of Bel Air. He was 90. Born and raised in Belfast, Ireland, Mr. Mateer ran away to the sea when he was 13, and served onboard windjammers as a cabin boy. He later was trained as a machinist and joined the British merchant service, working passenger liners. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Royal Navy and served at sea and on land bases at Sierra Leone and Cairo.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Oscar Hammerstein, who died in 1961, is getting a 100th birthday party on Maryland Public Television tonight, for his lyrics live on through some of the best musicals of the American theater.* "Love and War" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Quickee quiz: Who was Jay Thomas' first co-star in this sitcom? Although not renewed for fall, it's back for a few weeks to run out the string of episodes never aired. Quickee answer: In the fall of 1993, Annie Potts took over from Susan Dey, who was dumped after dim ratings in the first season.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1996
ABC tonight offers what may be the closest view yet of what it's like to live on death row."Morgan State Choir: A Silver Celebration" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This commemoration of 25 years under the guidance of director Nathan Carter concludes with a stirring rendition of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony."PrimeTime Live" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Cynthia McFadden follows death-row inmate Antonio James, convicted in 1979 of two murders in New Orleans, to the moment he was executed in March 1996 by lethal injection.
NEWS
By Elmer P. Martin and Joanne M. Martin | December 30, 1997
BLACK people who think that Steven Spielberg's latest movie ''Amistad'' is about black heroes taking their freedom by any means necessary are doomed to disappointment upon seeing the movie.While the film is loosely based on the true story of a group of Mende people from Sierra Leone, who in 1839 overpowered their Spanish captors aboard the slave ship La Amistad, it is largely a tale of white hero worship.The movie gives little time to the bloody slave mutiny led by Sengbe Pieh (called Joseph Cinque in the United States)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Oscar Hammerstein, who died in 1961, is getting a 100th birthday party on Maryland Public Television tonight, for his lyrics live on through some of the best musicals of the American theater.* "Love and War" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Quickee quiz: Who was Jay Thomas' first co-star in this sitcom? Although not renewed for fall, it's back for a few weeks to run out the string of episodes never aired. Quickee answer: In the fall of 1993, Annie Potts took over from Susan Dey, who was dumped after dim ratings in the first season.
FEATURES
By Lewis Beale and Lewis Beale,New York Daily News | January 26, 1994
Chris Elliott says he doesn't mind if you call his brand of comedy "stupid." The pratfalls, the non sequiturs, the general air dweebiness -- it's all part of his shtick."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 8, 1994
Let me tell you, "Cabin Boy" makes "Wayne's World 2" look like Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason."I thought Jerry Lewis had retired the Oscar category of "Most Irritating Performance by a Minor Comedian," but Chris Elliott must not have gotten the word. He's out to cop the trophy for all time. When he's done you won't even remember "The Nutty Professor."Elliott will be familiar to early "Late Night With David Letterman" fans; on that show, in the mid-'80s, he etched a small post-midnight persona based on blithe stupidity combined with infantile hostility, mostly built around resentment of Letterman's success.
NEWS
May 10, 1993
MATTHEW BOOZ, 10, son of David and Barbara Booz of Scott Drive in Westminster.School: Fifth-grader at William Winchester Elementary School.Honored for: Matthew had one of the main roles in the fifth-grade musical, "In Quest of Columbus," last week. He played a cabin boy on one of Christopher Columbus' ships and sang a duet, "La Navidad," with another cabin boy.Goals: To become either a math teacher or an author.Comments: "I think it's a fun part," he said of the cabin boy role. He also has enjoyed his other musical activities, such as singing in the Carroll County Children's Choir, taking piano lessons and playing trombone in the school band.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 27, 1993
/TC Long before Hollywood brought its infamous rogue of the sea to life, 18th-century Colonial American artist John Singleton Copley painted his own captivating version of a terrifying shark attack.Copley's depiction of the rescue of a young cabin boy from shark-infested waters received high praise for its power and realism from the London press and public in 1778, and earned the artist a lasting reputation."Watson and the Shark" is now the centerpiece of an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington that looks at the story behind the work and how Copley created the masterpiece.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | August 29, 1999
Four years ago, a man known only as the Unabomber demanded that two major newspapers print his 35,000-word manifesto -- or he'd strike again. After much agonizing over ethics and journalistic responsibility, both papers acquiesced.Today, Ted Kaczynski is locked away for life. But he hasn't stopped writing.Next month, another publication -- an obscure student-run magazine at the State University of New York at Binghamton -- will serve up Kaczynski's latest creative ramblings, penned in his Colorado prison cell.
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