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By JOSEPH R. L. STERNE | April 19, 1994
Washington. -- Given its druthers, the American foreign-policy establishment would be content to have Helmut Kohl remain as chancellor of Germany forever. Since this does not seem to be in prospect, his many status-quo admirers here would settle for his election next October to five more years -- and then worry about the future.There are good reasons for the U.S. level of comfort with the Kohl-led right-center coalition that has been in power for the past dozen years.The sixtysome chancellor is of an age that enabled him as a teen-ager to witness the extraordinary generosity of American occupiers after the defeat of Hitler Germany.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Special to the Sun | February 25, 2001
It's rare to find a real gem among books, even in a cluster of seven. So when there's a diamond and a couple of sapphires in the group, the pain of gazing into the cubic zirconias is somewhat dulled. Let's start with the diamond: A brilliant first novel by Douglas Galbraith, "The Rising Sun" (Atlantic Monthly Press, 529 pages, $25). This is historical fiction and universal fiction, a tale of Scottish identity, English injustice, adventure and disaster. Set at the end of the 17th century, the story is told by Roderick Mackenzie, an up-and-coming young man who joins a momentous expedition to the New World, a bold effort by the Scottish people to claim trade and wealth for themselves and escape the economic depression perpetuated by the neighboring English.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Viola Brown from Indiana was looking for an easy recipe for making Polish cabbage. Brown said that she is 82 years old and doesn't have much of an appetite anymore, but that certain foods, like good cooked cabbage, still appeal to her. Jeanette Lehman from Glen Burnie shared her recipe for Polish sweet cabbage. She said the recipe comes from her mother, who emigrated from Poland, married and began making the dishes she remembered from her childhood. While her mother did not write her recipes down, Lehman said how blessed she was growing up with her mother as her teacher and that she has been able to duplicate some of her recipes just from her memory of how they tasted.
NEWS
By Gholam Rahman and Gholam Rahman,Cox News Service | April 11, 2007
I have never used bagged, precut cabbage for coleslaw but would like to do so because of the convenience. Is it as good as doing my own from a head of cabbage, in flavor as well as in texture? I have used the bagged cabbage, and have shredded my own as well. Frankly, if it's fresh, the difference in either texture or taste is imperceptible - once all the other stuff goes into the mix. Make sure, though, that the sale date on the bag is still well within the limit and the shredded cabbage does not look wilted or discolored.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 13, 1991
Eating cabbage on St. Patrick's Day may bring you more than good luck. Researchers can't give specific recommendations, but one serving a week of cruciferous vegetables appears to provide some protection against colon cancer.Cruciferous (pronounced crew-SIF-er-us) is the scientific name for vegetables from the cabbage family, including cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, rutabaga, kale and turnips. Because of the good things these vegetables provide, try to eat cabbage or a member of its family at least once a week.
FEATURES
August 9, 1992
If I return in another life, then let me be a cabbage plant. I won't have to change a thing.Cabbages are big. They are round. They are heavy feeders. And they take up a great deal of space in the bed.That's me, all over.Is there a more manly vegetable than cabbage? I've grown heads the size of bowling balls that dwarfed other garden crops. My favorite is a variety called savoy. It has a large, thick head and bumpy leaves that look like muscles. Savoys are the Arnold Schwarzeneggers of the vegetable patch.
FEATURES
By Karla Cook and Karla Cook,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 18, 1995
It's salad season, and sweet, peppery and redheaded is the way to be, especially if we're talking cabbage.Red cabbage is high in sulforaphane, which has been found to stimulate enzymes that guard against tumors. It's high in vitamin C as well.At the market, choose red cabbages that are compact and heavy for their size, with bright, crisp leaves. At home, wrap the whole head in paper towels, then in a paper bag, and store it in the crisper section of your refrigerator.Caribe CruditesServes 64 cups slivered red cabbage2 Belgian endives, rinsed and very thinly sliced crosswise2 ripe large tomatoes, thinly sliced1/2 seedless cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced1 cup diced ( 1/4 -inch)
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS DTC | November 8, 1992
Howard Countians have thrown their support behind one of the most bogus political fads to come along in some time, approving term limits for County Council members by a lopsided margin of 78 percent to 22 percent.I might also point out that there was a time when people put their names on waiting lists by the thousands to buy Cabbage Patch dolls.While I oppose term limits, I must confess that nine years ago I did place my name on one of those Cabbage Patch lists. So Ithink I understand why so many people fell for the allure of term limits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | November 12, 2009
The gardener's never-ending search for color, even in the bleak months of fall and winter, has brought cabbage and kale out of the kitchen and into the garden. With the help of hybridizers, these peasant vegetables have been transformed into the colorful stars of late fall. Their blue-green outer leaves can enclose gem-like centers that run the rainbow from creamy white and yellow to deep red, touching on pink and lavender in between. Or their deeply cut and spiky foliage can look like something fanciful from a coral reef.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013
Dominic D'Andrea has recently been to 13 cities as producing artistic director of the One-Minute Play Festival, but the place that really stands out in his mind? Baltimore. Sure, he's a hometown guy, but he seems to really mean it. "You'd be hard-pressed to find indie theater and arts groups as impressive as EMP, Single Carrot, Glass Mind, etc.," he said. "The guys just go for it. " And that's a good thing, since the 32-year-old Severna Park native is bringing OMPF to town for the first time this weekend (8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at EMP Collective, 307 W. Baltimore St., $15, empcollective.org )
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
I woke up this morning hungry for some good homemade Corned Beef and Cabbage. I found this one in the old Meal Planner archives. Looks easy enough. Who makes a good corned beef and cabbage around town? If you have a good homemade corned beef recipe, or can vouch for a good restaurant version, let us know about it. Corned Beef and Cabbage      Preparation time: about 30 minutes     Cooking time: 3 hours and 15 minutes        1 3 1/2-pound flat-cut and well-trimmed corned beef brisket     1 onion, studded with 10 whole cloves     3 large cloves garlic     3 each large sprigs fresh thyme and flat-leaf parsley, tied together     1 large bay leaf     1 teaspoon mustard seed     1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns     12 small white onions (about 2 ounces)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Don Schline, a senior sales advisor with Mackenzie Commercial Real Estate in Baltimore, and his buddies really know how to throw a tailgate party. The core group of 15, organized and motivated by their friend Scott McClure, are all friends from their high schools days. The group has been tailgating together in Lot H1 at M&T stadium at every home game, rain or shine, since the Ravens played their first game there. They are united by their passion for their hometown team and their love of good food.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | November 12, 2009
T he gardener's never-ending search for color, even in the bleak months of fall and winter, has brought cabbage and kale out of the kitchen and into the garden. With the help of hybridizers, these peasant vegetables have been transformed into the colorful stars of late fall. Their blue-green outer leaves can enclose gem-like centers that run the rainbow from creamy white and yellow to deep red, touching on pink and lavender in between. Or their deeply cut and spiky foliage can look like something fanciful from a coral reef.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | March 11, 2009
Americans don't give themselves enough credit for corned beef and cabbage. Too often, corned beef and cabbage is thought of as an Irish dish. It's actually an Irish-American hybrid: Cooked cabbage may have old-world roots, but the corned beef is a distinctly American addition. So is the tradition of eating corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick's Day, according to Margaret M. Johnson, author of The Irish Pub Cookbook. "It's definitely an Irish-American dish, derived from the very Irish bacon and cabbage," Johnson said.
FEATURES
By Arthur Schwartz and Arthur Schwartz,New York Daily News | January 26, 1994
Don't ask me, "Why eat parsnips and rutabagas when there are perfectly good asparagus and artichokes in every market?" First, I'll argue that the asparagus and artichokes don't taste nearly as good now as they will in April and May. Then I'll give you a pompous lecture about cooking and eating seasonally and how it impacts on your personal well-being -- spiritually and physically -- not to mention the well-being of the planet. I hate to go gastronomically correct on you, but that's what would happen.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 4, 1993
Coleslaw was not high on my list of favorite dishes when I was growing up in Maryland. The mayonnaise dressings with heavy doses of sugar simply didn't appeal to me.Still, as a young bride in Israel, when I was trying to learn how to cook from books, I decided to try to make this popular American salad. After all, I knew that cabbage is inexpensive and healthful.One of the books on my shelf, the 1963 edition of "The Good Housekeeping Cookbook," had 17 different versions of coleslaw. There had to be one I would like!
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 2, 2008
The cabbage patches along Route 20 just outside of Seneca, N.Y., are as big as some of the dairy farms in Harford County. Farmers in Lancaster County, Pa., alone produce more than twice the amount of milk of all the dairy farms in Maryland. While maple syrup production has slowed to a trickle in Garrett County, it is still big business in rural sections of New York and Pennsylvania. These are just a few tidbits of agriculture knowledge I picked up during recent tours of farming operations in New York and Pennsylvania.
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