Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCabaret
IN THE NEWS

Cabaret

ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2004
Party committee member Lee-Ann Fick is still raving about last weekend's gala fund-raiser for the Concert Artists of Baltimore. Artistic director Ed Polochick and event co-chairs Sally Dunn and Annamaria Walsh got the evening swinging. After all, the party had a 1940s big-band theme, "In The Mood." But the biggest hit of the evening came from a swinger of a different sort -- former Baltimore Oriole Brooks Robinson. Lee-Ann couldn't believe what a sweetheart he is. She says there was a wine auction, with some of those bottles' winners also receiving a baseball signed by the Hall-of-Famer.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
When Rick Stohler, a third-grade teacher at Columbia's Dasher Green Elementary and a local performance artist, died of cancer in April 2002 at the age of 48, Terry Sweeney, Stohler's life partner, wondered how he would conquer his grief. A few months later, Sweeney started a project that he and Dasher Green teachers had talked about during the last days of Stohler's illness: a scholarship in Stohler's honor. Sweeney said the scholarship project has helped him to cope with Stohler's death while memorializing Stohler's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 8, 2004
Cabaret times two Life will be a cabaret when the Maryland Arts Festival gets under way at Towson University this weekend with two shows - the 1966 musical Cabaret and an evening of cabaret singing called Broadway Bound. Set in a decadent Berlin nightclub between World Wars, the Tony Award-winning Cabaret (score by John Kander and Fred Ebb, book by Joe Masteroff) begins performances tomorrow and stars Michael Stebbins as the emcee, Catherine Brookman as Sally Bowles and John Parry as her love interest, Clifford Bradshaw.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
It all started when Veronica Matricardi spun in her wheelchair in the middle of the stage and yelled, "I'm back, I'm back!" It was June and she had just seen a show at the Colonial Players theater house in Annapolis. Other audience members were filing out, but not Matricardi. She longed to experience the joy of being onstage again. She didn't have to wait long. Joe Thompson, director of Colonial Players' Cabaret for Kids, was there and invited Matricardi to join the cast. "My dream has been to become an actor again," said Matricardi, who in 1979 as a teen-ager performed in a Colonial Players production of Rumpelstiltskin before suffering a stroke the next year.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2003
When the theater gets into your blood as a youngster, it tends to stay there a lifetime. That sums up the creative life of Annapolis' Joe Thompson, the head of video programming for the Anne Arundel Board of Education's cable channel -- who also is one of the area's busiest actors and directors and whose resume boasts appearances at Colonial Players, Chesapeake Music Hall and the Bowie Playhouse. When not acting or directing, Thompson writes plays, skits and songs. Those efforts will be brought to life in Cabaret for Kids, a revue of his funny, highly original material that will be performed at Colonial in Annapolis during the first two weekends in August by a vibrant cast of 14 children and five adults ranging in age from 6 to 75. "I love everything about doing these shows," said Thompson, who put together his first such Cabaret six years ago to help celebrate Colonial Players' 50th anniversary season.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2003
TODAY * Noon David Brown Quartet (jazz), Bay Cabaret Main Stage * 3 p.m. Chef Marc Marchand from Bo Brooks gives a cooking demonstration, Chesapeake Kitchen * 3 p.m.-4 p.m. Naked Blue (pop), Bay Cabaret Main Stage * 5 p.m. Chef Gordan Cameron from Legal Sea Foods gives a cooking demonstration, Chesapeake Kitchen * 5 p.m. Chef Antonio Baines from Tapas Teatro gives a cooking demonstration, Chesapeake Kitchen * 6 p.m.-7 p.m. WRNR's Happy Hour features music by Dirty City Band and Boister, Bay Cabaret Main Stage TOMORROW * 6 a.m. 92Q Live Broadcast by "The Big Phat Morning Show," Bay Cabaret Main Stage * Noon Oyster Shuck-Off and Slurp-Off, Chesapeake Kitchen * Noon Angela Taylor (pop/ rock)
FEATURES
By Alan Cowell and Alan Cowell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2003
LONDON - In the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, when Justin Butcher's Madness of George Dubya was playing at a fringe theater in north London, Butcher began to sense that some Americans might bridle at his virulent lampoon of the Bush administration and its readiness to go to war. But now that Dubya has moved from the fringe into the mainstream West End for a four-week run and has been hailed by some critics here as an overdue revival of political satire...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Can you perform cosmetic surgery on an adored 100-year-old and still keep her recognizable to the loved ones? The grande dame in question is the venerable Algonquin Hotel, the neo-Renaissance literary landmark and sometime intellectual oasis that was haven to the witerati of the fabled Round Table. The new owners of the hotel, which turned 100 last month, are sprucing up for the centennial. The transformation goes beyond the new six-foot-wide oil painting of the Round Table acolytes, which was installed in the lobby restaurant, replacing a smaller 1998 painting removed by the previous owners.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 6, 2002
The production of Cabaret that ran at the Mechanic Theatre two years ago was edgy and daring, an artistic triumph. The production of Cabaret running for the next three days at the Lyric Opera House is humdrum and uninspired, a major letdown. The difference between the two is an example in miniature of a troubling trend of the latter staging second-rate shows while charging first-rate ticket prices. Make no mistake - Cabaret (which traces the relationship between an English honky-tonk singer and an American writer in decadent, pre-Nazi Berlin)
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
As sure as its nude dancers and drink specials drew steady customers, the Ritz Cabaret on South Broadway in Baltimore attracted trouble. A money-laundering scheme launched at the Fells Point nightclub landed three men, including owner Francis Lee, in federal court. A bar brawl cost two Drug Enforcement Administration officers their badges. Illegally hired Hungarian dancers faced deportation. Even the producers of an HBO drama filmed part of the series at the Ritz, only to learn that it was about to be seized by the government.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.