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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 31, 2009
It would be impossible, not to mention foolhardy, to choose one contender for the title of America's greatest songwriter. But if such a designation absolutely had to be made, a lot of money would be riding on Irving Berlin. There is such a startling amount of quality in the quantity of Berlin's songs (more than 1,200), and a remarkable consistency in terms of communicative power. A hearty sampling of that power is on display in "A Concert Salute to Irving Berlin," the fast-paced cabaret show onstage through the weekend at the Everyman Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 24, 2009
This is the most Irving Berlin-est time of the year, what with "White Christmas" being heard, in one form or another, a zillion times. But it's really always Berlin time, since the songwriter, who died in 1989 at the age of 101, was such a prodigious creator of treasurable hits. A sampling of that legacy will be celebrated in "A Concert Tribute to Irving Berlin" opening Friday at the Everyman Theatre. This is the third in the theater's series of cabaret shows over the past few years guided by music director Howard Breitbart.
TRAVEL
June 14, 2009
The Gettysburg Festival Where: : Historic downtown Gettysburg, Pa. When: : Thursday through June 28; times vary, depending on venue What: : The 10-day festival is focused on cultural arts, with more than 100 events, featuring more than 800 artists and performers. Highlights include appearances by actor James Earl Jones, celebrity chef Richard Blais of Bravo's Top Chef and sculptor Mike Shaffer, as well as musical and dance performances, children's activities, free classes, art shows and cabaret productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009
FRIDAY Cabaret: A Dozen Things I Want to Do on Stage is an eclectic one-woman cabaret show by Rebecca Nagle, a local new-media artist. Modeled after turn-of-the-century European cabaret, A Dozen Things is part burlesque, part performance art and part storytelling. A Dozen Things takes place at Load of Fun Studios, 120 W. North Ave. 9 p.m. Ticket prices vary. Go to loadoffun.net. Alsop and Bronfman: In the season-ending program, Yefim Bronfman performs Rachmaninoff's notoriously difficult Piano Concerto No. 3, with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Marin Alsop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,sloane@sloanebrown.com | May 3, 2009
Think sophisticated supper clubs are a thing of the past? Not for one evening last week, when the Baltimore Choral Arts Society presented "A Ruby Cabaret." Several hundred guests in "nightclub chic" mingled in the Grand Lodge, all abuzz about the evening's entertainment, singer Hilary Kole. "[She's] a fantastic cabaret artist from New York, who's been rippin' things up at Birdland and the Algonquin and the Rainbow Room and Lincoln Center. It's her first appearance in Baltimore. People are going to go nuts for her," said BCAS music director Tom Hall.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 3, 2009
Classic movies are returning to the Senator this weekend, part of an effort to derail the scheduled April 20 foreclosure auction of the 70-year-old North Baltimore landmark. Bob Fosse's 1972 Cabaret, with Liza Minnelli in her Oscar-winning role, and Christopher Lee in 1958's Horror of Dracula kick off what outgoing owner Tom Kiefaber plans as a series of classic-film screenings, with proceeds used to defray operating costs and work toward bringing current the theater's mortgage. Cabaret, which won eight Oscars (and probably would have won nine, had a little film called The Godfather not won Best Picture)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
After its groundbreaking opening season of three largely undiscovered plays, Standing O Productions has begun its second season with three performances of 52 Pick-Up by T.J. Dawe and Rita Bozi. This little-known, seldom performed play met Standing O's stated goal of introducing audiences to entertaining, thought-provoking and engaging works not previously done in the area, works that inspire after-performance discussion. This play, on the last weekend of February, also defined this second season's theme of illustrating what theater is capable of being and doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
Beware of flying crockery. I'm pleased to report that no members of the audience were accidentally beheaded during a recent performance of Le Cabaret de Carmen. That would be carrying the quest for authenticity a bit too far. But at times, it was a close call. Most singers portraying the Gypsy siren Carmen use castanets when they dance. Sophie-Louise Roland uses shards of a plate that she obligingly shatters on stage. At one point, Roland flung her arm so vehemently over her head that a heavy metal bracelet flew off her arm and ricocheted against the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ARIANE SZU-TU | August 14, 2008
Stone Soul Picnic Celebrate African-American culture at the Stone Soul Picnic at Druid Hill Park. The event, sponsored by radio station Magic 95.9, brings artists from around the country together for eight hours of live music. Musicians include Grammy-winning Regina Belle (she won in 1994 and has been nominated four other times) and Eric Benet, who had an infamous relationship with Halle Berry but also had a platinum-selling record, thanks to his Grammy-nominated vocals. The picnic is noon-8 p.m. Saturday at the park, 2600 Madison Ave. Call 410-396-7900 or go to magic959baltimore.
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