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Cabaret

NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
When Rick Stohler, a third-grade teacher at Columbia's Dasher Green Elementary and a local performance artist, died of cancer in April 2002 at the age of 48, Terry Sweeney, Stohler's life partner, wondered how he would conquer his grief. A few months later, Sweeney started a project that he and Dasher Green teachers had talked about during the last days of Stohler's illness: a scholarship in Stohler's honor. Sweeney said the scholarship project has helped him to cope with Stohler's death while memorializing Stohler's life.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 8, 2000
Set in a sleazy Berlin nightclub between the two World Wars, "Cabaret" has always been a dark musical. But director Sam Mendes' interpretation is more than dark, it's dangerous - and thrilling. If director Harold Prince's original 1966 version hovered on the edge of explicit sexual, social and political commentary, Mendes' version, playing a two-week run at the Mechanic Theatre, dares to go over the edge, hanging on by its luridly polished fingernails. The result is, quite simply, sensational - in every meaning of the word.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | December 29, 2006
My 14-year-old granddaughter Marie, her friend and I are about to discover whether First Night Annapolis can in fact delight all ages and tastes. At Sunday's 16th annual New Year's Eve event, a family-oriented, alcohol-free celebration of the arts staged downtown, we plan to sample each other's cultures while savoring our own. The event starts with First Act from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Here the youngest celebrants and their parents will be entertained in several rooms with balloon games, face painting, arts and crafts, clowns and puppets.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 8, 1991
The white Karmann Ghia screeches to the curb on a rainy Monday night. Laure Drogoul --es out, late as usual, her vinyl go-go boots clacking against the asphalt.It's not her feet you notice first, though; it's her head. Yards of silver and gold fabric have been draped around it like a turban and fastened with a fake spider hatpin. But that's just part of the visual show-and-tell: She's also wearing a sleeveless sequin gown, rabbit's head pendant (yes, it's real) and more black eyeliner than Tammy Faye Bakker.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 5, 1999
James Naughton has won Tony Awards for his performances in the musicals "Chicago" and "City of Angels," but he admits he used to think of himself as merely an actor who sings.He's been reconsidering, however, thanks to his New York cabaret act, "Street of Dreams." On Saturday, he will perform an hourlong abridged version of that act at Center Stage Presents, the theater's annual black-tie gala."People who thought they knew me from the musicals, when they see this, they go, `I had no idea that you did this,' " Naughton said from New York last week.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 3, 2000
"I always said Lea was born performing." Shannon Katona is talking about her younger sister, Lea Thompson. Most people know Thompson as the star of the NBC television series "Caroline in the City" or the mother in the "Back to the Future" movies. Beginning Tuesday, however, Mechanic Theatre audiences can see her in a considerably less wholesome role, that of "divinely decadent" Sally Bowles in the 1998 Tony Award-winning revival of Kander and Ebb's "Cabaret." Sally, a second-rate singer performing in a raunchy Berlin dive between the two World Wars, may seem like a stretch for Thompson, especially since this is her first musical.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 6, 2002
The production of Cabaret that ran at the Mechanic Theatre two years ago was edgy and daring, an artistic triumph. The production of Cabaret running for the next three days at the Lyric Opera House is humdrum and uninspired, a major letdown. The difference between the two is an example in miniature of a troubling trend of the latter staging second-rate shows while charging first-rate ticket prices. Make no mistake - Cabaret (which traces the relationship between an English honky-tonk singer and an American writer in decadent, pre-Nazi Berlin)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.Wynn Rousuck and J.Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 13, 2000
Center Stage doesn't know if it's ever been tried before, but artistic director Irene Lewis thinks playwright Brendan Behan would have liked nothing better. The production of Behan's "The Hostage" that begins performances Friday, is being staged in a cabaret setting. Tables, chairs and a cash bar will all be part of the environmental design in Center Stage's flexible, upstairs Head Theater. The setting seems like a natural for a play that takes place in an Irish boarding house/brothel/bar.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 6, 2001
Part nightclub act and part biographical drama about the late singer Dinah Washington, "Dinah Was" has been produced at regional theaters from coast to coast and off-Broadway. But it's difficult to imagine a more appropriate setting than the cabaret configuration of Center Stage's Head Theater. Playwright Oliver Goldstick is aiming for more than an evening of cabaret, however. Washington's life was tumultuous, and her story is replete with themes of racism and sexism. And yet "Dinah Was" is more sheer entertainment than stirring drama.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 1997
Cabaret has returned to Chesapeake Music Hall on Wednesday nights and Saturdays after the dinner show.Singing piano man and cabaret veteran Doug Yetter has brought back this popular form of entertainment, an Annapolis tradition that dates back at least 30 years to when Dick Gessner rocked Marmaduke's smoke-filled upstairs room. Cabaret flourished later, during Yetter's and Sherry Kay's seven years at Marmaduke's.A strong case can be made for cabaret at Chesapeake. For starters, Kay has been missed since she left Marmaduke's, and with good reason.
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