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October 10, 1990
Andre Grabar, 94, an internationally known expert on Byzantine art, died Friday at his home in Paris. An author, lecturer, and archaeologist, he was born in Kiev, Ukraine, and educated in St. Petersburg. In 1928 he earned a Ph.D. in Byzantine art from the University of Strasbourg, France. He taught art history there until 1937 and at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris until 1966. He was also a professor of early Christian and Byzantine archaeology at the College de France in Paris from 1946 to 1966, and a research professor at Dumbarton Oaks Institute of Harvard University from 1950 to 1964.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings in the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents became evident early, and he began drawing portraits when he was 9 years old. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings in the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents became evident early, and he began drawing portraits when he was 9 years old. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 23, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings throughout the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents began early, and when he was 9-years-old, he began drawing portraits. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 23, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings throughout the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents began early, and when he was 9-years-old, he began drawing portraits. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | September 9, 2007
GARY VIKAN, DIRECTOR of the Walters Art Museum, is a specialist in Byzantine art. He lectures on topics such as icons, early Christian pilgrimages and Elvis. But he has embraced the modern era, publishing his own blog on the museum's Web site. Every Wednesday he discusses art and cultural issues, and welcomes comments from readers. At the moment, he's preparing for a new exhibition at the museum: Deja Vu? Revealing Repetition in French Masterpieces, a show that opens next month exploring the significance of artistic repetition through the art of 11 celebrated 19th- and 20th-century French painters.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 23, 1992
Somewhat more than midway through the exhibit "Gates of Mystery: The Art of Holy Russia" at the Walters Art Gallery we come upon a street person.Hair flying around, cloak falling off, he looks like one of those wild-eyed characters who stand on street corners and tell passers-by they're all going to hell if they don't mend their ways. Only this is a 16th century Russian street person, known as a Holy Fool, and his appearance on an icon indicates that he was revered -- the "fool" with God-given powers to drive out devils and lead sinners back to the path of righteousness.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
David Feinberg, 37, a writer and AIDS activist, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome Wednesday in New York. His two fictional works, "Eighty-Sixed" and "Spontaneous Combustion," documented the devastation of New York City's gay life by the AIDS epidemic. A collection of essays, "Queer and Loathing: Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone," is to be published this year by Viking.Richard Krautheimer, 97, an art historian known for his work on early Christian and Byzantine art, died Tuesday in Rome.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 1997
NEW YORK - "The Glory of Byzantium" exhibition on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through July 6 shows the influence of the Orthodox Christian church in illuminated manuscripts, processional crosses, small and large mosaics, fragments of frescoes, painted icons, gold and enamelled medallions and ivory carvings.Byzantium was the heartland of Orthodox Christianity, and much of this art was created in the centuries when the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity, long drifting apart, formally divided.
NEWS
April 17, 1994
The appointment of Gary Vikan as director provides continuity and maintains momentum at the Walters Art Gallery.Mr. Vikan, assistant director and medieval curator, had been helping run the museum during the interregnum since former director Robert P. Bergman went to the Cleveland Museum of Art last May. He has helped to plan the ambitious improvements that, as director, he is now assigned to achieve. Mr. Vikan knows what he is getting into.The Walters Art Gallery needs to renovate its "new" wing, which is 20 years old and not entirely suited to what it does, and reinstall much of the permanent collection.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | September 9, 2007
GARY VIKAN, DIRECTOR of the Walters Art Museum, is a specialist in Byzantine art. He lectures on topics such as icons, early Christian pilgrimages and Elvis. But he has embraced the modern era, publishing his own blog on the museum's Web site. Every Wednesday he discusses art and cultural issues, and welcomes comments from readers. At the moment, he's preparing for a new exhibition at the museum: Deja Vu? Revealing Repetition in French Masterpieces, a show that opens next month exploring the significance of artistic repetition through the art of 11 celebrated 19th- and 20th-century French painters.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 23, 1992
Somewhat more than midway through the exhibit "Gates of Mystery: The Art of Holy Russia" at the Walters Art Gallery we come upon a street person.Hair flying around, cloak falling off, he looks like one of those wild-eyed characters who stand on street corners and tell passers-by they're all going to hell if they don't mend their ways. Only this is a 16th century Russian street person, known as a Holy Fool, and his appearance on an icon indicates that he was revered -- the "fool" with God-given powers to drive out devils and lead sinners back to the path of righteousness.
NEWS
October 10, 1990
Andre Grabar, 94, an internationally known expert on Byzantine art, died Friday at his home in Paris. An author, lecturer, and archaeologist, he was born in Kiev, Ukraine, and educated in St. Petersburg. In 1928 he earned a Ph.D. in Byzantine art from the University of Strasbourg, France. He taught art history there until 1937 and at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris until 1966. He was also a professor of early Christian and Byzantine archaeology at the College de France in Paris from 1946 to 1966, and a research professor at Dumbarton Oaks Institute of Harvard University from 1950 to 1964.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 14, 1994
Gary Vikan, the newly appointed director of the Walters Art Gallery, could reasonably be called a modern-day Renaissance man.He's a serious scholar, a person who tackles whatever he does with dedication and skill, whether that be creating catalogs on Byzantine art or writing a paper on Elvis Presley's Graceland. He's a man who on first meeting seems reticent, but is warm and even endearing to those who know him well.He possesses a wry sense of humor, plays a fair game of golf and can cook up a storm.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 13, 1994
The Walters Art Gallery's lengthy search for a new director ended yesterday when the museum hired one of its own -- Gary Vikan, who has served the past nine years as assistant director for curatorial affairs and curator of medieval art.Dr. Vikan is "uniquely qualified to lead the Walters into the 21st century," Jay M. Wilson, president of the gallery's board of directors, said in announcing the choice. "He is an internationally known scholar, . . . a skilled administrator, a gifted educator and a talented communicator."
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