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By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
Howard County Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. underwent heart surgery yesterday at a Baltimore hospital and could be out of the courthouse recuperating for nearly three months, court officials said. Kane, 61, was listed in critical but stable condition last night at Union Memorial Hospital after heart bypass surgery. The usual recovery time for bypass surgery is eight to 12 weeks. Kane entered Howard County General Hospital early Monday complaining of chest pains, and was transferred that afternoon to Union Memorial for tests.
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NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | June 8, 2009
For most patients with diabetes and clogged arteries who have not had a heart attack, treatment with drugs and lifestyle changes are as effective at reducing death as immediate bypass surgery or angioplasty, researchers said Sunday. For diabetics with a more severe form of heart disease requiring immediate surgery, bypass surgery is more effective than angioplasty at reducing heart attacks and strokes but not deaths, researchers reported at a meeting of the American Diabetes Association in New Orleans.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 17, 1992
Black men who have heart attacks are less likely than white patients to undergo bypass surgery, a new study has found. At the same time, they have a better survival rate -- at least in the short term.These results suggest that the differences in treatment are not simply due to discriminatory attitudes on the part of doctors, the researchers said yesterday. In fact, the puzzling findings could mean that blacks receive appropriate surgical treatment while whites receive too much, they added.
FEATURES
June 26, 2008
Alzheimer's Specific type of brain plaque linked to disease Researchers have uncovered a new clue to the cause of Alzheimer's disease. The brains of people with the memory-robbing form of dementia are cluttered with a plaque made up of beta-amyloid, a sticky protein. But there long has been a question whether this is a cause of the disease or a side effect. Also involved are tangles of a protein called tau; some scientists suspect this is the cause. Now, researchers have caused Alzheimer's symptoms in rats by injecting them with one particular form of beta-amyloid.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 14, 2002
Poly athletic director Mark Schlenoff, who suffered a heart attack on Monday, is recovering at St. Joseph's Medical Center in Towson following quintuple bypass surgery. Schlenoff, 57, the school's AD for the past 13 years, suffered the heart attack while doing yard work at his Lutherville home. He is expected to be on his feet today and should be released "Friday or Saturday," said his son, Adam Schlenoff. "Everyone's been calling," said Schlenoff's wife, Geri. "It's been wonderful. I guess when you've been around the school system for 30 years, a lot of people have concerns."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Patricia Meisol and Jonathan Bor and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writers | February 17, 1994
The use of heart bypass surgery on patients who are not seriously ill causes about 6,300 avoidable deaths a year and costs the U.S. economy about $9 billion a year, according to a study by a Baltimore research firm.Researchers with HCIA Inc., a health economics research firm, said in a report yesterday that the patients' lives might have been spared if doctors had opted for a less traumatic procedure known as angioplasty.The study found that bypass surgery had a lower death rate in only one group: the most seriously ill patients, or those with complete blockages in one or more coronary arteries.
SPORTS
By John F. Steadman and John F. Steadman,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Former Baltimore Colts quarterback John Unitas underwent coronary bypass surgery early yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center, his family said.Unitas, 59, was listed in serious condition last night, the normal post-operative condition after cardiac surgery."We're encouraged about his early signs," said John Unitas Jr., who visited with his father yesterday. "He's a man of great heart."The operation, directed by a team headed by Dr. Alejandro Sequeira, lasted three hours and was precipitated by a breathing difficulty and chest pains while Unitas was resting at Kernan Hospital after a successful Thursday operation for a right knee replacement, performed by Dr. Kenneth Spence.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 18, 1992
Older whites are 3 1/2 times more likely than older blacks to receive potentially life-saving surgery to bypass a blocked coronary artery, according to a new study that offers striking evidence of a wide racial gap in access to medical care.The study, based on more than 86,000 coronary artery bypass graft surgeries performed under the Medicare program, found that the gap was widest in Southeastern states, where whites were more than six times as likely to have the operation as blacks. It also found that the procedure was five times more prevalent among white men than black men."
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1992
Patients with a mild form of clogged arteries are twice as likely to die from bypass surgery as they are from angioplasty, in which a balloon is inflated inside the arteries to open them up, according to the first major study to compare the two procedures directly.The study appears to raise some serious questions about the use of bypass surgery in such low-risk patients, its authors said.They added that the difference in risk between the two procedures was probably even higher now because the study involved patients treated during 1985, when angioplasty was first being widely used.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
A Rockville biotechnology company yesterday announced a deal that it hopes will lead to drugs that will complement, or in some cases replace, the role of bypass surgery in heart patients.Genvec Inc. said it had acquired worldwide rights from California-based Scios Inc. to develop genetic therapies based on Scios' vascular endothelial growth factor. Genvec said VEGF 121 is produced by a gene that signals the body to create new blood vessels. The new vessels may restore the flow of blood and oxygen to parts of the heart that are being starved because vessels that normally feed the muscle are clogged with fat.Researchers at Genvec said the goal is to learn how to use Genvec's drug delivery systems to target Scios' growth factor at the proper parts of the body, making the combination a potentially effective therapy for heart patients.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 2007
After more than a decade-long decline, is heart bypass surgery poised for a comeback? Some doctors say it may be time to give bypass operations a second look, including some cardiologists who specialize in the far more popular alternative - using stents to keep coronary arteries propped open. No one is predicting a sudden surge back to bypass, which is still a far more invasive and initially riskier way to treat plaque-clogged heart arteries, a condition that afflicts millions of Americans.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | January 11, 2007
For nearly two decades, the Rev. Frank M. Reid III has been the shepherd guiding one of the Baltimore area's largest and most influential congregations. Virtually every serious candidate for citywide and state office visits his church, Bethel African Methodist Episcopal -- and this year, at least two leading contenders for mayor are members. The Upton church plans to break ground on a Baltimore County location this year to accommodate the thousands who attend weekly services. Reid has even been immortalized on The Wire television series.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
As if anyone needed more proof that life is unfair: It is becoming increasingly clear that depression not only makes you feel miserable, but can also damage your heart. On top of that, a heart attack or other cardiovascular ailments can trigger depression. Together, the conditions can significantly increase your chances of dying. Chronic depression doubles the probability of having a first heart attack or stroke. "That's about the same risk as smoking," says Dr. Daniel Ford, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and an expert on mental health and heart disease.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
In Brief Bypass surgery vs. stent Bare-metal stents, used to prop open cleared heart arteries, fail to lengthen survival as much as bypass surgery in patients with multiple diseased blood vessels, according to a study published in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine Researchers in New York found that patients with more than one clogged cardiac artery were about 25 percent less likely to die when surgeons routed the flow of blood around an...
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Almost every practice of the Carver wrestling team ends with its members running laps. Senior captain Shawn Gates always makes sure to finish first. It could be considered a captain's responsibility, setting an example for everyone else. For Gates, 17, it's much more. About this time last year - Feb. 15 to be exact - he was at Johns Hopkins Children's Center undergoing heart bypass surgery as the result of a congenital condition. Today, the lanky, 152-pound athlete with the inspirational heart will take a 15-7 record into the Baltimore City tournament, with his sights on a crown.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - Vice President Dick Cheney, who has had four heart attacks, underwent three hours of tests at a Washington hospital yesterday after suffering shortness of breath, but went home when doctors found no abnormalities. "I feel fine," Cheney, 63, said as he walked out of the George Washington University Medical Center and waved to reporters. "Sorry we ruined your Saturday," said his wife, Lynne Cheney. Because of Cheney's long history of heart trouble, neither he nor his doctors were inclined to ignore signs of a potential problem.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 2007
After more than a decade-long decline, is heart bypass surgery poised for a comeback? Some doctors say it may be time to give bypass operations a second look, including some cardiologists who specialize in the far more popular alternative - using stents to keep coronary arteries propped open. No one is predicting a sudden surge back to bypass, which is still a far more invasive and initially riskier way to treat plaque-clogged heart arteries, a condition that afflicts millions of Americans.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Almost every practice of the Carver wrestling team ends with its members running laps. Senior captain Shawn Gates always makes sure to finish first. It could be considered a captain's responsibility, setting an example for everyone else. For Gates, 17, it's much more. About this time last year - Feb. 15 to be exact - he was at Johns Hopkins Children's Center undergoing heart bypass surgery as the result of a congenital condition. Today, the lanky, 152-pound athlete with the inspirational heart will take a 15-7 record into the Baltimore City tournament, with his sights on a crown.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2004
When Bill Clinton underwent quadruple coronary bypass surgery on Labor Day, the former president, like most Americans who have similar operations, spent time (73 minutes) hooked up to a heart-lung machine while surgeons rerouted blood vessels to his heart. With luck and his relative youth and health going for him, Clinton, 58, will likely rebound from the bypass surgery, in which doctors replace clogged heart arteries with blood vessels from elsewhere in the body. But many who undergo the procedure, as 305,000 Americans did in 2001, the latest year for which figures are available, find that their brains don't work as well as they did before - at least for a few days, but often for weeks and sometimes years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
About three-quarters of the patients who receive an expensive, invasive and risky laser treatment for the chest pains of heart disease do not meet the medical criteria for which it was approved, researchers reported yesterday. The Food and Drug Administration approved the treatment - TMR, for transmyocardial revascularization - only for patients with severe chest pains who could not have bypass surgery or angioplasty. But the researchers found that large numbers of surgeons are performing it while patients are having bypasses.
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