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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Reading Monday's article at Poynter.org on corrections , I find myself at odds with Steve Buttry and Craig Silverman, who think that errors inserted by editors should be identified as such, because bylines make reporters visible and expose them to social-media abuse.  I may have to rethink that.  People who have commented on the subject point out that readers of a bylined story assume that the writer is responsible for any...
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Reading Monday's article at Poynter.org on corrections , I find myself at odds with Steve Buttry and Craig Silverman, who think that errors inserted by editors should be identified as such, because bylines make reporters visible and expose them to social-media abuse.  I may have to rethink that.  People who have commented on the subject point out that readers of a bylined story assume that the writer is responsible for any...
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NEWS
March 4, 1992
When Ernest Hemingway landed a job on the Toronto Star in 1920, it was not unusual for aspiring young writers of serious fiction to spend time as ink-stained wretches in the newsrooms of big city dailies. There they learned their craft under the tutelage of experienced editors and indulged their curiosity about people and places. Not every cub reporter who eked out a living pounding the typewriter keys had Hemingway's keen ear or descriptive flair. But not even a Hemingway was exempt from the daily chore of chronicling the multitude of mundane happenings that are the bread and butter of newspaper work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
The Baltimore Sun staff and its favorite fans and followers are gathering on Wednesday, March 28 at Bond Street Social. The Baltimore Sun meetup at Bond Street Social goes from 6 to 8 p.m. Happy hour prices will be in effect throughout with $4 for all beers, $5 for call drinks and wine and $6 select specialty cocktails. Bond Street Social is very social. All of chef Neill Howell's plates are meant to be shared. Signature "Social Drinks" are brought to the table in an 80-ounce infusion jar, perfect for sharing among your fellow Sun fans and even with the Sun staff, who are generally deligthed to share just about anything except their byline.
FEATURES
By James H. Bready | June 30, 1996
A generation ago, a young Baltimore insurance salesman yearned for the writer's life. How could he get his name on a newspaper's payroll? The advice of an Evening Sun acquaintance was direct: Write an article, sell it to an editor, have a clipping with your byline on it. Have a bunch of clippings.So he got in touch with Sun Magazine. Shortly afterward, it published an illustrated piece on the city employee whose job included scrubbing, weekly, all 228 stone steps inside the Washington Monument.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
Reporters, columnists, photographers and artists at The Sun, who are members of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, are expected to start a "byline strike" Monday, declining to put their names on stories, columns, pictures and graphics in the paper. The move comes with just 10 days remaining before the June 24 expiration of the current contract covering Guild workers at the paper. Union leaders said the duration would depend on movement in negotiations on a new contract. The Guild represents more than 600 Sun employees, including about 300 in the newsroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | September 24, 2000
Back in 1972, the group Dr. Hook spoke for countless musicians when it sang about what a thrill it would be "to see my smiling face / On the cover of the Rolling Stone." But there were also those whose dream was to see the story they wrote on the cover of Rolling Stone. These were kids who read Rolling Stone in high school and college, who used its profiles and reviews to stoke their own knowledge and enthusiasm, and who revered the writers almost as much as they did the stars. It's not the most common rock and roll dream, but it's the one at the heart of director Cameron Crowe's new film, "Almost Famous."
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
The byline of Tawanda W. Johnson, a contributing writer, was inadvertently omitted from an article about Dundalk in the June 15 real estate section.
NEWS
June 2, 1998
Carol Tavris' name was misspelled in the byline and credit line for an article on school violence that appeared Sunday in the Perspective section.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 6/02/98
NEWS
February 7, 1997
In yesterday's Live section, the byline was inadvertently left off the cover story about duckpin bowling. The article was by Sandra Crockett.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/07/97
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 13, 2004
IN MY MOST recent column before this one, I wrote that I was taking a year off. The column ran in September 2001, which was, um, almost three years ago. Another blown call by the same guy who (full disclosure here) gave a thumbs-up to the Albert Belle signing and the Glenn Davis trade when they happened. Not that I'm ashamed to admit that. Everyone makes mistakes. But not everyone swings and misses when predicting the length of his own vacation. Hopefully, I'll get a few calls right now that I'm returning to writing sports columns for The Sun, the job I held for more than 14 years before taking my (longer-than-expected)
NEWS
By Paul Moore | June 6, 2004
MEMORIAL DAY weekend was especially memorable this year with U.S. troops engaged in a war in Iraq and the upcoming 60th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. The Sun ran a front-page story with a lead photo in its Sunday editions about the dedication of the World War II Memorial in Washington. The newspaper also published a lead photo of Memorial Day events on the front page Monday and Tuesday. It also was a big weekend for Sun sports reporter Kevin Van Valkenburg. On Sunday and Monday, his two-part narrative, "Rayna's Second Season," was published.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
The byline of Tawanda W. Johnson, a contributing writer, was inadvertently omitted from an article about Dundalk in the June 15 real estate section.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 16, 2003
Bylines are missing from stories, columns, pictures and graphics in this morning's edition of The Sun because reporters, columnists, photographers and artists, who are members of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, are withholding their names from their work. Some staff bylines will continue to appear because the paper's foreign correspondents, reporters in the newspaper's Washington bureau and interns are not members of the Guild. The byline strike comes just more than a week before the June 24 expiration of the current contract covering Guild workers at the paper.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
Reporters, columnists, photographers and artists at The Sun, who are members of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, are expected to start a "byline strike" Monday, declining to put their names on stories, columns, pictures and graphics in the paper. The move comes with just 10 days remaining before the June 24 expiration of the current contract covering Guild workers at the paper. Union leaders said the duration would depend on movement in negotiations on a new contract. The Guild represents more than 600 Sun employees, including about 300 in the newsroom.
FEATURES
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 28, 2003
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Rick Bragg said he will resign from the New York Times after it was revealed he didn't give a freelance reporter credit for reporting published under Bragg's byline. In an interview with the Washington Post yesterday, Bragg said he'll quit in a few weeks because a "poisonous atmosphere" had descended on the New York Times. New York Times spokeswoman Catherine Mathis denied that Bragg had resigned. Bragg told the Post that he hired J. Wes Yoder as an assistant for a story about Florida oystermen in 2002.
NEWS
March 14, 1997
Because of an editing error, the wrong byline appeared on an Annapolis Symphony review in Thursday's Sun. Contributing writer Mary P. Johnson wrote the review.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/14/97
FEATURES
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 28, 2003
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Rick Bragg said he will resign from the New York Times after it was revealed he didn't give a freelance reporter credit for reporting published under Bragg's byline. In an interview with the Washington Post yesterday, Bragg said he'll quit in a few weeks because a "poisonous atmosphere" had descended on the New York Times. New York Times spokeswoman Catherine Mathis denied that Bragg had resigned. Bragg told the Post that he hired J. Wes Yoder as an assistant for a story about Florida oystermen in 2002.
FEATURES
By Neil A. Grauer and Neil A. Grauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2003
The most famous "embedded" war correspondent in Baltimore journalistic history was a man who traversed the killing sands of Omaha Beach three times on D-Day and thereafter became almost a member of the family in countless Baltimore homes: Lou Azrael. Louis Azrael (1904-1981) was the star columnist of the old News-American, which in its heyday as the largest circulation daily in Maryland was better known as the News-Post and Sunday American. His column, begun in the old Baltimore Daily Post in 1927, was required reading for politicians, lawyers, bureaucrats and the general public for more than half a century.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 8, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Readers of this space may notice a name missing from the byline today. My partner of 24 years, Jack Germond, has retired to the hills of West Virginia, conveniently within shouting distance of the Charles Town racetrack, leaving me to continue the column on my own. We had a pretty good run of it under a double byline, which has several advantages. It enabled us to bounce column ideas off each other daily, to stop to think occasionally about what we were writing and, once in a while, to sneak off to meet other obligations or just play hooky when the mood struck.
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