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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
A New York auction of more than 300 pieces of space memorabilia took in more than $443,000 over the weekend, including $18,400 paid by a Scarsdale lawyer for a plastic toothbrush carried to the moon by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. But two of the most poignant items in the sale - a flight suit and helmet offered by the family of Columbia astronaut David Brown - were withdrawn after NASA told the family the equipment was still government property. Officials at Swann Galleries said the two Brown items had been expected to sell for at least $48,000.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 20, 2007
The moon nears its first-quarter phase tonight, the 38th anniversary of the first manned lunar landing. Look up. People walked there in 1969. Moonwalker No. 2, Buzz Aldrin, said in 1970, "We understood the significance what we were doing. I felt like we were not alone." They weren't. Millions of us watched, spellbound. Neil Armstrong, No. 1, told Life magazine of a recurring dream: "He was able to hover over the ground if he held his breath. ... It was a beautiful dream." It was.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 20, 2007
The moon nears its first-quarter phase tonight, the 38th anniversary of the first manned lunar landing. Look up. People walked there in 1969. Moonwalker No. 2, Buzz Aldrin, said in 1970, "We understood the significance what we were doing. I felt like we were not alone." They weren't. Millions of us watched, spellbound. Neil Armstrong, No. 1, told Life magazine of a recurring dream: "He was able to hover over the ground if he held his breath. ... It was a beautiful dream." It was.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
A New York auction of more than 300 pieces of space memorabilia took in more than $443,000 over the weekend, including $18,400 paid by a Scarsdale lawyer for a plastic toothbrush carried to the moon by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. But two of the most poignant items in the sale - a flight suit and helmet offered by the family of Columbia astronaut David Brown - were withdrawn after NASA told the family the equipment was still government property. Officials at Swann Galleries said the two Brown items had been expected to sell for at least $48,000.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 26, 1998
AS MEMORY serves, they piped Alan B. Shepard's pioneering spaceshot over the intercom at Baltimore City College, where my 10th-grade class was slogging through one of Mr. Dittman's geometry lectures on the fascinating life of the parallelogram. We were all a little disappointed that day, because Shepard's ride lasted only 15 minutes. It meant that, when he returned to Earth, we still had to suffer through 35 minutes of the joys of parallelograms.The newspapers all offered glowing tributes to Shepard last week, when he died, at 74, after a long struggle with leukemia.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1999
EDNA WRENN has seen enormous changes in her lifetime. Born in Washington on Aug. 28, 1899, she has lived through two world wars and the Great Depression and has witnessed, on television, man's first walk on the moon.Mrs. Wrenn celebrated her 100th birthday last week at Harmony Hall Retirement Community in Hickory Ridge."I had four birthday parties," she said. "It lasted all week. I had so many friends and relatives there. It was wonderful."On Friday, a representative from the county executive's office attended a party held in her honor and presented her with a proclamation declaring Saturday to be Edna Wrenn Day in Howard County.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 24, 2009
As in, "get him the ball in space" or "he operates best in space." This phrase makes me think of Johnny Rodgers at Nebraska, but Buzz Aldrin operated pretty well in space, too. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/mediumwell)
FEATURES
July 20, 1999
Today in hisory: July 20In 1881, Sioux Indian leader Sitting Bull, a fugitive since the Battle of the Little Big Horn, surrendered to federal troops.In 1944, German officials tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler with a bomb at his Rastenburg headquarters. The explosion only wounded the Nazi leader.In 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon.In 1977, a flash flood hit Johnstown, Pa., killing 80 people and causing $350 million in damage.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | July 22, 1994
When Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin flew off from the surface of the moon 25 years ago, they left behind an array of instruments that scientists are still using to measure meticulously the motions of the Earth and its satellite.Long after the Apollo team retired, younger scientists are learning with precision just how far the Earth and moon are separated.They know how fast the moon rotates and how much the Earth wobbles as it spins on its axis.Many instruments have stopped working, but clusters of reflecting devices, which require no power, remain.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Jordan Bartel | jordan@bthesite.com and b free daily | March 5, 2010
Still coming down from the unexpectedly riveting Winter Olympics? We've got you covered. Here's our pop culture week in review -- with a bit of Olympics chaser to go down smoothly. VIENNA WINS 'THE BACHELOR': Apparently, not just for sausages anymore. ASTRO-NUT: Oh, Buzz Aldrin. You can either talk scientifically about bringing man to Mars or you can join the cast of "Dancing With the Stars." But not both. LINDSAY LOHAN TO PEN MEMOIR: Stop trying to make "respectability" happen, Lindsay.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1999
EDNA WRENN has seen enormous changes in her lifetime. Born in Washington on Aug. 28, 1899, she has lived through two world wars and the Great Depression and has witnessed, on television, man's first walk on the moon.Mrs. Wrenn celebrated her 100th birthday last week at Harmony Hall Retirement Community in Hickory Ridge."I had four birthday parties," she said. "It lasted all week. I had so many friends and relatives there. It was wonderful."On Friday, a representative from the county executive's office attended a party held in her honor and presented her with a proclamation declaring Saturday to be Edna Wrenn Day in Howard County.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 26, 1998
AS MEMORY serves, they piped Alan B. Shepard's pioneering spaceshot over the intercom at Baltimore City College, where my 10th-grade class was slogging through one of Mr. Dittman's geometry lectures on the fascinating life of the parallelogram. We were all a little disappointed that day, because Shepard's ride lasted only 15 minutes. It meant that, when he returned to Earth, we still had to suffer through 35 minutes of the joys of parallelograms.The newspapers all offered glowing tributes to Shepard last week, when he died, at 74, after a long struggle with leukemia.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
How fitting the crew of NASA's final space shuttle mission will end almost 42 years to the day men set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first humans to visit earth's closest neighbor in space. I'm fortunate to be able to recall that July evening in 1969 when the world held its breath as the Eagle landed on that airless world. Although Neil Armstrong and Buzz Armstrong planted the American flag on the lunar surface, I give credit to the Russians for making the "one small step for man" possible.
FEATURES
By Lea Lion and Lea Lion,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 15, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - Not screened Mirrors, a thriller about an ex-cop who discovers secrets hidden in reflections, was not screened for critics. If you were around in July 1969, chances are you remember exactly where you were when Apollo 11, the first manned mission to the moon, touched down and astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. took their first steps there. Now the Eagle has landed again, reimagined, for a new generation. The 3-D animated film Fly Me to the Moon tells the tale of a young fly named Nat who stows away aboard Apollo 11 with a couple of his buddies and accompanies Armstrong on the moonwalk.
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