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NEWS
December 13, 2010
As a soon-to-be 40-year state employee, I and many of my public safety peers are wondering about the fairness of Gov. Martin O'Malley's buyout offer, since virtually all of us — parole and probation agents and supervisors, state police officers and correctional officers, for example — are on the long exclusion list. However other employees of the same and other agencies who are in very limited or unique job classifications and who may have relatively limited experience apparently are not excluded.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
In the week leading up to Towson's appearance in the Football Championship Subdivision title game last Saturday, school officials, alumni and fans basked in the team's success. They also peppered athletic director Tim Leonard with an oft-repeated question regarding head coach Rob Ambrose. "'Are we going to be able to keep Rob?'" Leonard recalled. "I know that was the No. 1 question I got during the week of the championship game. Now, we can answer that. " The university on Wednesday erased any doubt about Ambrose's future by annoucing a new deal that will keep him at the school until 2020.
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NEWS
November 21, 2009
Workers at Advertising.com in Baltimore will be eligible to participate in a voluntary buyout program that its parent company, AOL LLC, is planning next month as part of a larger effort to cut one-third of its work force, or 2,500 positions. Advertising.com, which is AOL's online advertising network, employs about 400 people at the Tide Point office complex in South Baltimore. Time Warner Inc. is spinning off AOL, a one-time Internet giant, on Dec. 9, and the company will be accepting volunteers to leave between Dec. 4 and 11. AOL, which is based in New York City, has said that if it does not get enough volunteers, it will resort to involuntary layoffs.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Peninsula Regional Medical Center announced Wednesday that it will lay off 58 employees and offer buyouts to 130 as the number of patients it treats declines. The employees who lose their jobs will be offered severance packages and the opportunity to apply for other jobs at the Salisbury hospital, the company said in a statement. Peninsula Regional on average has 66 fewer patients in the hospital a day than last year. The medical center is licensed for 288 beds and expects that number to decrease to 250 within the next two years.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Maryland has completed a negotiated buyout of defensive coordinator Todd Bradford's contract -- clearing the way for the school to hire a replacement. The Sun reported Dec. 22 that Bradford -- whose defense  ranked last in the Atlantic Coast Conference, surrendering an average of 34.2 points and 457.2 yards per game -- was likely out. The school has now reached a buyout agreement with Bradford. The terms are not yet public. "We appreciate Todd's efforts this past season and wish him well in his future endeavors," Maryland coach Randy Edsall said in a news release.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Superstorm Sandy barely laid a glove on Smith Island last fall, to hear residents tell it. Though storm-driven flooding damaged hundreds of homes in Crisfield and the rest of Somerset County, only a couple islanders got any water in their homes from the surging Chesapeake Bay. Yet with the island slowly shrinking and sinking into the bay, the state is considering using $2 million of the federal storm recovery aid it's received so far to buy out...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
State officials have decided to forge ahead with a controversial offer to buy out about 10 homeowners on Smith Island as part of a plan for helping Somerset County recover from superstorm Sandy. The Department of Housing and Community Development earmarked $1 million for buyouts on the island, out of $8.6 million in federal aid the county is to receive to help businesses and residents repair and rebuild after the fall storm. Many islanders had objected to the buyout, saying they felt it unfairly targeted Smith residents for relocation when other coastal areas on the mainland suffered more damage and are arguably more vulnerable to future storms.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley offered state workers a $15,000 buyout Tuesday to quit by the end of January — the latest effort by officials to cut costs as they look ahead to another huge budget shortfall next year. The offer, which adds $200 per year of service, is the first of its kind extended by the O'Malley administration. "This is part of many things that we're going to have to do" to close the budget gap, O'Malley said after establishing the State Employees' Voluntary Separation Program by executive order.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
A proposed buyout of Smith Island homeowners to help them escape future damage from tropical storms and rising waters has been dropped amid vocal resistance from residents of the low-lying community in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. The Somerset County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday not to offer buyouts with any of the $8.6 million in federal aid the lower Eastern Shore county is in line to receive to help it recover from the ravages of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Would “Breaking Bad” spend the duration of “Buyout,” the follow-up to last week's morality rollercoaster “Dead Freight,” dealing with the fall-out? It seemed like a legitimate question given the gravity of last week's events: the crew pulled off an incredible heist only to have new-guy Todd kill a young, non-threatening witness on a dirtbike at the last frame. “Breaking Bad” has hinted as violence toward children (Walt and Brock last season being the most recent but not only example)
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
With a shareholder vote just days away, T. Rowe Price, one of Dell Inc.'s major investors, reaffirmed its opposition to a $24.4 billion buyout offer for the personal computer manufacturer. "We continue to believe the proposed buyout does not reflect the value of Dell and we do not intend to support the offer as put forward," Brian Rogers, Price chairman and chief investment officer, said in a statement Monday. The Baltimore-based money manager owned 71.8 million shares, or 4.03 percent of Dell, at the end of March, Morningstar reports.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
State officials have decided to forge ahead with a controversial offer to buy out about 10 homeowners on Smith Island as part of a plan for helping Somerset County recover from superstorm Sandy. The Department of Housing and Community Development earmarked $1 million for buyouts on the island, out of $8.6 million in federal aid the county is to receive to help businesses and residents repair and rebuild after the fall storm. Many islanders had objected to the buyout, saying they felt it unfairly targeted Smith residents for relocation when other coastal areas on the mainland suffered more damage and are arguably more vulnerable to future storms.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Even the most jaded observer must acknowledge there's something admirable about the desire of so many living on Smith Island to see their community survive and prosper. Residents of this marshy (and shrinking in both population and real estate) archipelago on the lower Eastern Shore have had to overcome much in recent years, particularly as their chief means of livelihood, harvesting the seafood bounty of the Chesapeake Bay, has declined. But it's one thing to admire the hard work, independence and faith of Smith Island's residents - who number a mere 276, according to the 2010 Census - and it's another to deny the reality of their circumstances.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
A proposed buyout of Smith Island homeowners to help them escape future damage from tropical storms and rising waters has been dropped amid vocal resistance from residents of the low-lying community in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. The Somerset County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday not to offer buyouts with any of the $8.6 million in federal aid the lower Eastern Shore county is in line to receive to help it recover from the ravages of...
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Tim Wheeler 's report on the future of Smith Island and the state's idea to buy residents out so they may relocate tells a heartbreaking story of people whose attachment to the island goes back many years, 400 years in some cases ("Smith Islanders debating a state buyout proposal," May 13). If the buyout is taken by just some residents, it may make life untenable on the island for those who want to stay. They have organized a letter-writing campaign to fight the buyout idea. It is very important to fight climate change on the local level.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Superstorm Sandy barely laid a glove on Smith Island last fall, to hear residents tell it. Though storm-driven flooding damaged hundreds of homes in Crisfield and the rest of Somerset County, only a couple islanders got any water in their homes from the surging Chesapeake Bay. Yet with the island slowly shrinking and sinking into the bay, the state is considering using $2 million of the federal storm recovery aid it's received so far to buy out...
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | May 14, 1993
THE magic word in business these days is "buyout." xTC Companies are feverishly offering their employees buyout contracts so that they will leave and reduce the work force of the institution. More money is being made from buying out employees than there is from manufacturing a product.The great success story of the buyout strategy is the Lean and Mean Screwdriver Company. The buyout vice president is Warren Tenderloin. When I arrived he was sitting at a card table in front of the main gate of his factory with a stack of bills in front of him. There was a line of people as far as the eye could see. Warren was counting out the bills and shaking hands with each (( person.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
Even Stuart Berger called his $300,000 buyout "foolish" and "a lot of money to give someone for doing nothing." He added, "I feel bad about it."The former Baltimore County school superintendent probably isn't alone in that feeling. Odds are plenty of county taxpayers feel not only "bad" about it but downright outraged.Dr. Berger, relieved of his duties earlier this week, can't be faulted for taking the payoff. When he realized his tenure was nearing an end, he hired an attorney to land as good an offer as he could get. The county school board came through with an offer that was better than good.
BUSINESS
By Michael Oneal and Steve Mills, Chicago Tribune reporters | January 12, 2013
Aside from the business suit he was wearing, which he joked was rented for the occasion, Sam Zell was never more himself than when he appeared at a New York lender conference in April 2007 to hawk his $8.2 billion buyout of Tribune Co. Slinging one-liners and a couple of his trademark expletives, the self-assured billionaire held a crowd of potential backers in thrall as he explained why he was willing to bet his reputation on a transaction that...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Legg Mason Inc.'s stock retreated Friday, a day after shares shot up on a report that the company's board rejected — at least for now — a proposal by senior managers at its affiliates and private equity investors to take the company private. The Baltimore-based money manager's stock rose by more than 3 percent Thursday, but Friday the stock dropped 32 cents to close at $26.52 per share. The decline was driven largely by newly released figures Friday showing that money continued to flow out of Legg funds in the last quarter, said Jeffrey Hopson, a senior analyst with Stifel, Nicolaus & Co. in St. Louis.
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