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BUSINESS
By Dian Hymer | November 20, 1994
When can I withdraw an offer?You can withdraw an offer to purchase property at any time up until it has been accepted by the seller and the signed acceptance has been delivered to you or to your agent.The delivery aspect is critical. Let's say you make an offer on a property. The seller takes several days to decide, then signs your offer. Meanwhile, you find another house you like better and decide you don't want to buy the first house. If your agent notifies the first seller's agent that you are withdrawing your offer before that seller's signed acceptance is delivered to you, or to your agent, then your offer is safely withdrawn.
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FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
The last time Yasmin and Adil Degani bought a home, they took the traditional route. They went with a commission-based real estate brokerage to show them homes and guide them through the homebuying process. This time around, in an effort to save money and time, they decided to try an emerging path. The Odenton couple went with Redfin, a "technology-powered brokerage" that employs salaried agents and encourages buyers to use online profiles of homes to determine what properties to tour.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2003
The pre-printed real estate contract used by most Maryland real estate companies requires buyers and sellers to mediate any dispute arising out of the contract before filing a lawsuit or instituting an administrative proceeding. Mediation often is effective in settling disputes. The parties are brought together with a neutral mediator who often can assist them in resolving their conflict. But the real-estate contract does not disclose that each party must pay a $100 administrative fee to initiate mediation and that mediators charge each party $100 for two hours.
NEWS
By Jeffrey S. Detwiler and President and Chief Operating Officer The Long & FosterĀ® Companies | September 26, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT After what was easily the longest economic downturn in recent times, momentum is building and national headlines are trumpeting news of economic gains. In the residential housing sector, these swiftly-changing market dynamics certainly offer more opportunity for buyers and sellers than what we've experienced in recent years - but the recovery-driven changes in real estate have also left some consumers' heads spinning. In some areas of the Mid-Atlantic region, those who want to buy houses aren't always finding options that meet their needs at the price point they were expecting and sellers are sometimes surprised to find that their homes are on the market weeks or even just days before they receive offers.
BUSINESS
By Dian Hymer | February 6, 1994
Can I cancel a contract without losing my deposit?It's customary for buyers to make a deposit at the time they enter into a contract to purchase a home. The amount of the deposit is negotiable, and it's usually applied toward the buyer's cash down payment at closing.Your purchase contract should spell out what will happen to the deposit if the contract is terminated. For instance, if the purchase is contingent upon a certain event happening (such as loan approval or satisfactory inspections of the property)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
Home sellers and buyers have been scratching their heads over a new state law designed to clarify types of real estate agency relationships in Maryland.Agents must now explain the ways in which they're legally permitted to represent buyers and sellers, who in turn must officially make their choice in writing. But the new law -- in effect since Jan. 1 -- has initially proven more confusing than helpful, as agents and managers grapple with presenting a new set of disclosure forms to clients and customers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
Tee Tillman can tell right off when it's going to be a bad day at the settlement table.Buyers who discovered a leaky faucet during a final walk-through of a house just hours earlier can't close until they get repair estimates. Sellers divorcing each other choose settlement as the time to haggle over splitting the proceeds. Or, too frequently, says the senior vice president of Fountainhead Title Group in Columbia, buyers and sellers come in on time and loan TTC documents never show up.Settlement officers have seen it all -- those snags threatening the biggest investment most people will ever make.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
Despite the beating that business-to-business e-commerce companies took last year, Internet markets are expected to quadruple in size by 2002, according to industry analysts. But as the more than 1,000 Internet markets - or digital marketplaces that electronically link buyers, sellers and business partners online - grow, the number of players could dwindle . Last year, Wall Street support for high-tech start-ups evaporated when they failed to meet earnings expectations. By December, several business-to-business Internet sites closed shop for good, including a pioneer, Chemdex.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1991
IRVINE, Calif. -- The average sales price of an existing single-family home increased in 37 states last year, according to statistics released last week by Century 21 Real Estate Corp.Maryland had the nation's 12th-highest rate of appreciation -- 4.5 percent.Appreciation in 1990 ranged from a high of 22.7 percent in Hawaii to a low of -5.7 percent in New Jersey. Alaska recorded a 20.5 percent appreciation rate in 1990. Oregon, at 12.5 percent, also recorded double-digit appreciation.States recording more than 3.0 percent depreciation were all in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Should a real estate company be allowed to represent both buyer and seller in a single transaction?It appears to be a conflict-of-interest: a broker giving his allegiance to both parties in a home sale. Some opponents of the practice liken it to a law firm representing both sides in a trial.But such arrangements -- known as "dual agency" -- exist, and the attorney general says they're OK. A bill before the General Assembly would explicitly permit companies to act as "dual agents" under certain conditions.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Greens and apples were sold by the bushel Sunday as shoppers stuffed their bags and carts at the Baltimore Farmers' Market in preparation for Thanksgiving. "This is our best market of the year. Next week will probably be the worst - everybody will be too full," said Bryan Kerney, owner of Truck Patch Farms in Carroll and Frederick counties. He'd sold more than 100 turkeys in less than 3 1/2 hours at the market, which is tucked under the Jones Falls Expressway. By 11:30, he had sold out of Steve Anderson's favorite pork sausage, before the Catonsville man could get there to buy a few pounds of it. Anderson was toting two trash bags that held a bushel each of kale and collards - enough for the first shift of the 50 to 60 guests expected at his home on Thursday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
More than two thirds of home sellers believe their homes should be priced higher than an agent's recommended listing price, while two thirds of buyers believe homes are overpriced, say Maryland real estate agents in a HomeGain poll released Monday. But at the same time, homeowners clearly understand that home values have plummeted, according to a separate survey. A second-quarter survey by real estate Web site HomeGain shows buyers and sellers sharply at odds. The trend in Maryland reflects the poll's national findings, which show that more than two-thirds of home sellers think their home is worth more than the recommended price, and nearly two-thirds of the buyers believe homes are overpriced.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
That silver-plated coffee server you've always meant to use is just collecting dust. Then there's that dress, bought last season, forgotten at the back of the closet. And your son's bicycle with the training wheels - he outgrew that in weeks. You're surrounded by unwanted or little-used stuff when what you really need, frankly, is some extra cash. But could your discards be another person's treasure? Whatever the item - from clothes to sporting goods to wedding gowns to used tools - there's probably a consignment shop eager to sell it. Consignment shops, which sell goods for you and take a cut of the proceeds, say their business is surging amid the nation's economic downturn.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | November 20, 2006
Erika Linnander surveyed the piles of fungi in front of her. The table was covered with shitake, mitake, yellow oyster and abalone mushrooms, just to name a few. A cylindrical metal smoker nearby filled the air with the savory smell of cooking portabellos. "Can I help you with something?" a young, dark-haired woman behind the table asked. Linnander pointed to a box stuffed with mushrooms of different sizes and colors. "I'm going to take the mix," she told the vendor. Like many of the shoppers milling around in the crisp morning air yesterday at the Baltimore Farmers' Market, Linnander, a Johns Hopkins student who lives in the city's Mount Vernon neighborhood, was stocking up for Thanksgiving dinner.
NEWS
By MARINA SARRIS and MARINA SARRIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
What a difference a year makes. The days of homes being snatched up in bidding wars within days of going on the market seem to be gone. Anne Arundel County opened its busy spring real estate season with a market that was noticeably less frantic than the one that greeted home buyers and sellers this time last year. "We think it's going to be a good year, but it won't be a record year like the last five have been," said Tom Quattlebaum, chief executive officer of the Anne Arundel County Association of Realtors Inc. "There will be some market correction."
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
In a move that could transform the way real estate brokers work with home buyers and sellers, the Justice Department challenged yesterday a national real estate group's new policy permitting brokers to limit the display of home sale listings on the Internet. The government filed an anti-trust lawsuit against the National Association of Realtors, saying the new rule restrains competition from Web-based, discount real estate brokers, hurting home buyers and sellers. At the heart of the dispute over how to disseminate home sales information from Realtor-owned multiple listing services, the lawsuit charges, is resistance by traditional brokers to an onslaught of "virtual" brokers who charge less than traditional commissions.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
More than two thirds of home sellers believe their homes should be priced higher than an agent's recommended listing price, while two thirds of buyers believe homes are overpriced, say Maryland real estate agents in a HomeGain poll released Monday. But at the same time, homeowners clearly understand that home values have plummeted, according to a separate survey. A second-quarter survey by real estate Web site HomeGain shows buyers and sellers sharply at odds. The trend in Maryland reflects the poll's national findings, which show that more than two-thirds of home sellers think their home is worth more than the recommended price, and nearly two-thirds of the buyers believe homes are overpriced.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
The caller didn't know where to turn. The owner of an Alexandria, Va., townhouse had put his home on the market months ago. His real estate agent visited once, staked a "For Sale" sign in the yard, then dropped out of sight. Buyers were nowhere to be found. Now, he wondered whether the woman on the line could help.Another plea came from a homeowner facing foreclosure. He needed to sell his home at a lower price -- and fast. Yet another query came from a military man looking for help in relocating, preferably from someone who could speak Spanish to his wife.
BUSINESS
By Christine Demkowych and Christine Demkowych,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2003
Choosing a real estate agent can be a trying experience, especially for first-time homebuyers. Finding the right person is a little bit like dating - it requires soul-searching, preparation and an honest assessment of future needs. Most experts suggest that first-time buyers interview more than one before hiring an agent. A recent study by the National Association of Realtors found that most homebuyers hire the first agent they interview, although 40 percent of first-time buyers interviewed more than one agent before choosing.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2003
The pre-printed real estate contract used by most Maryland real estate companies requires buyers and sellers to mediate any dispute arising out of the contract before filing a lawsuit or instituting an administrative proceeding. Mediation often is effective in settling disputes. The parties are brought together with a neutral mediator who often can assist them in resolving their conflict. But the real-estate contract does not disclose that each party must pay a $100 administrative fee to initiate mediation and that mediators charge each party $100 for two hours.
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