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BUSINESS
March 30, 2010
The investment group that signed a contract a month ago to buy the Brass Elephant did not come up with the necessary deposit by Monday's deadline, a real estate broker involved in the deal said. "We have not gotten a deposit," said Kemp Byrnes, a broker representing the seller. "That's all I can tell you." But Byrnes said the deal is not dead. He said there is still "a conversation that's going on between the seller and buyer." The Brass Elephant building, at 924 N. Charles St. in Mount Vernon, has been vacant since the storied fine-dining establishment closed in August.
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NEWS
Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
T hinking of selling your home? Consider this: According to the National Association of Realtors, 92 percent of buyers use the Internet to search for homes. And that consummate time-saver for prospective buyers can also make or break a seller's chances of getting the asking price. Your home's initial appeal online determines its ability to compete with thousands of other offerings. Enter the home stager. Howard County real estate agents and buyers have been calling on their services for years.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 2010
Potential buyers for the Brass Elephant, who failed to come up with a deposit Monday, still want to go ahead with the deal, an owner of the shuttered Mount Vernon restaurant said Tuesday. Randy Stahl and the other owners closed the fine-dining establishment in August and put the building that housed it up for sale. An investment group planning to put a restaurant in the location signed a contract on the building a month ago and had until Monday to put down a deposit. The money never came.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Offenbacher Aquatics Inc., a regional retailer of patio furniture, grills and fireplaces, has been acquired by a private equity buyout firm that plans to expand the chain and upgrade stores and the online presence. Antson Capital Partners LLC, based in Baltimore, said Wednesday it acquired the Lanham-based retailer's seven stores, in Maryland and Virginia. Financial terms were not disclosed. "Offenbacher's has strong name recognition and presents us with a substantial opportunity to increase market share in the region and expand our footprint," Andrew Cohen, an investor who was named chief executive officer of Offenbacher, said in the announcement.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
We're going to make this a simple bar blog today. The Orioles are still clinging to the second American League Wild Card spot - a ½-game ahead of three teams. So, yes, they are still very much in the postseason race on July 16. But 4/5 of the Orioles' Opening Day rotation is either hurt or in the minors. Right now, the club's most experienced big league starter is 24-year-old Chris Tillman, who has made 37  major league starts - and just one this year. That could change Wednesday when someone - maybe Tommy Hunter - takes the spot of Jason Hammel, who is having knee surgery and will be lost for roughly a month, maybe longer.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
We've heard that the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. But how about keeping guns out of the hands of the bad guys in the first place? Right now, there is no federal law that punishes people who buy guns for criminals who are banned from purchasing firearms themselves. In a recent TV interview, Rep. Elijah Cummings spoke about a guy in Georgia whose girlfriend bought him 64 guns in less than three months. Some of those guns ended up at crime scenes in Maryland, a state in which it is much harder to buy guns.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 9, 2009
A Washington fish wholesaler and two of its buyers have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Greenbelt for their alleged roles in the largest striped bass poaching case in Chesapeake Bay history. Ocean Pro Ltd., also known as Profish, and Timothy Lydon of Bethesda and Benjamin Clough of Grasonville have been charged in federal district court with purchasing illegally caught striped bass from the Maryland and Virginia portions of the Potomac River from 1995 through 2007.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The owners of a Reisterstown store have been given probation after allegedly purchasing stolen jewelry taken in a rash of burglaries in Baltimore and Carroll counties last year. Baltimore County police last year cited the case of Crown Jewelry as an example of the easy market for stolen metals. Authorities said in November that they recovered hundreds of pieces of gold and silver jewelry linked to a string of nearly 30 area burglaries. A number of those pieces were recovered from Crown Jewelry, which had not reported the purchases to state regulators as required, authorities said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
A state mortgage program aimed primarily at first-time buyers is lowering its interest rate and setting aside $100 million to lure people relocating as part of the military's base realignment and closure initiative. Officials want to help those buyers and aid the region's still-struggling housing market at the same time. Thousands of federal workers and contractors are moving to take jobs at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Fort Meade or one of several other installations in Maryland as part of the base changes, known as BRAC.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
Imagine showing off your new car to friends and family only to get a call from the dealer — sometimes weeks later — saying your financing has fallen through. You're given the option of returning the car or signing a new sales agreement with terms that are likely less favorable. If you're like many buyers, consumer lawyers say, you will be too embarrassed to send the car back and opt to pay more instead. Consumer lawyers call this yo-yo financing, when dealers let buyers leave with a car and then reel them in again to say the agreement has changed.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Investors who tried for years to get a stake in 1st Mariner Bank have closed on their purchase of the Baltimore institution. New CEO Jack E. Steil and president Robert D. Kunisch Jr. said Wednesday that the deal was finalized Tuesday night. The purchasing group they're part of, organized under the name "RKJS Bank," paid $18.7 million and agreed to put about $92 million in cash into the bank to recapitalize it. Steil said the new management team spent the first day talking to workers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The investors buying 1st Mariner Bank said Monday that they've received the regulatory approvals they need and expect to close on the deal as soon as next week, turning the page on the Baltimore institution's most tumultuous chapter. The purchasers — who go by the name RKJS Bank — said they will put about $91 million in cash into the bank to recapitalize it, "significantly improving the strength of its balance sheet. " The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and Maryland's financial regulation agency both approved the transaction.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Real estate agents have long boasted of the lengths they'll go to market properties. Now, for some, the sky's the limit. As unmanned aircraft become more widely available, some agents have started to use drones to sell listings, inviting prospective buyers on aerial tours of country estates, waterfront acreage - and even standard, suburban development. "A buyer today wants to see a stunning Hollywood trailer experience," said Robert McArtor, an agent with Re/Max Components in Fallston, who uses a GoPro camera mounted on the belly of a quadcoptor to take aerial video of his listings.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
The founder of 1st Mariner launched the Baltimore bank as an alternative to big, faceless, out-of-state institutions at a time when banks based elsewhere had rapidly gobbled up 30 percent of the Maryland market. Now - 19 years and many acquisitions later - out-of-state banks control 80 percent of the pie. That change hasn't dampened the enthusiasm 1st Mariner's new owners feel for the bank. Just the opposite. The purchasing group with local ties, approved as the bank's winning bidder Tuesday by a federal bankruptcy judge, makes the same argument now that founder Edwin F. Hale Sr. offered in 1995: Baltimore needs this bank.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
More than 300 people banned from owning guns were able to buy them last year because the state police were overwhelmed with background check requests, police said Wednesday. People with histories of mental illness or convictions for violent misdemeanors, felons and fugitives were able to obtain and keep guns for three months or longer before state police reviewed the sales, according to records released by request to The Baltimore Sun. Maryland State Police finally cleared the backlog of background-check requests last week that began more than a year ago and once stood at more than 60,000, leading to months-long delays in investigating thousands of firearm transactions.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Stephanie and Jake Martin didn't have to wait long to sell their rowhouse in Baltimore's Canton neighborhood - they had a contract in three days. But buying a new place proved a bit more difficult. The Martins searched for months around Homeland in Baltimore and in Stoneleigh near Towson, but there wasn't much to see. One property that caught their eye ended up with something like a dozen offers. The couple ultimately snapped up a house in Homeland the day before it was listed for sale - thanks to a tip from friends across the street.
BUSINESS
By Don Finefrock and Don Finefrock,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 16, 1992
Thinking about buying a first home this year but haven't quite made up your mind?President Bush has a proposal designed to lure people like you off the sidelines and into a mortgage.It's a $5,000 tax credit for first-time home buyers. If Congress approves, it would work something like this:People who haven't owned a home for at least three years would qualify for the credit if they buy a house between Feb. 1 and Dec. 31, 1992.Contracts for homes signed by Dec. 31 would count, too, as long as the sale is closed by June 30, 1993.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 24, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- Gathered for a long and windy weekend in this seaside town, real estate agents from across the state are trying to get to the bottom of some nagging questions.With a slow summer behind them and with rates still relatively low, whatever happened to the pent-up demand that had been expected from buyers? In fact, they've been wondering, where exactly are all the buyers?It's not that business is as bad as two years ago, according to participants at the Maryland Association of Realtors annual convention here.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Your editorial blaming Maryland gun dealers for the state's delay in conducting background checks on prospective buyers was absolutely absurd ( "Panicking over Md.'s gun law," Jan. 13). The state wrote the requirements, waiting periods and time frame that allowed gun dealers to release legally purchased guns to buyers. It wasn't the dealers who created whose unenforceable procedures. It was wholly a state responsibility. The blame lies totally with the regulating body, not the dealers or buyers.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
The stranger showed up Tuesday morning at the Jacob family home in Sykesville in a black car with six chickens and a bundle of apologies. The mystery of the Sykesville chicken heist was solved. "I swear to you, you couldn't make this up," said Karen Jacob, counting the family's egg-laying hens Tuesday and finding that they once again added up to 20, not 14, as was the case late last Sunday. She and her husband and two sons had come home from dinner at her mother's in Glen Burnie to find someone had left a note and $40 cash at the door, and six of their 20 egg-laying hens were gone.
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