Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBuyer S Agent
IN THE NEWS

Buyer S Agent

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | April 17, 1994
Q: Are there local lenders or mortgage companies that provide mortgages without any settlement costs?M. Goldberg, ReisterstownA: Many local and national lenders with Maryland branch offices offer home equity loans between $5,000 and $100,000 with a choice of either a full waiver or a rebate of all closing costs based upon account usage.Also there are some other local lenders who offer "no cost" or "low cost" first mortgage loan programs. And the FHA and VA offer "streamlined refinance" programs with little or no settlement costs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Hopkins Smith | March 7, 2008
Would-be buyers in the market for an agent as well as a house should choose just as carefully as a seller. Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the Consumer Federation of America, suggests using a real estate broker whose office works exclusively with buyers. You might not get great service when a Realtor's loyalty is divided between you and colleagues working with sellers, he says. An "exclusive buyer agent" works in an office that does not take listings. The great majority of agents work with sellers as well as buyers, though you can find "buyer agents" who deal only with buyers but are based in an office that also sells.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill to require home sellers to give buyers a detailed disclosure of the property's condition easily passed a Senate committee yesterday.The 9-1 vote on the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee sends the bill to the full Senate for consideration later this week.Real estate agents have hailed Senate Bill 576 as a consumer protection measure, but it also is intended to protect agents from lawsuits by buyers."No one is losing, but everyone is going to benefit from it," said Edgar C. Hilley, executive vice president of the Maryland Association of Realtors.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | February 29, 2008
There are tons of Realtors out there - some great, some middling and some who are worse than none at all. How to choose? Buyers, stayed tuned for next week's column. Here's what the Consumer Federation of America thinks sellers should ask as they interview candidates: Experience: How many homes have the Realtors or other real estate agents sold in the past year? Ever? Ask for the names of a few past customers, said Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the consumer federation. "There's no perfect indicator of quality here, but experience and the experience their customers have had are important," he said.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998
Dear Mr. Azrael:I was wondering if I could buy another property even though I have a buyer's agent or if I can look at other properties if I have a buyer's agent.I've been looking at other properties with other agents even though I have a buyer's agent. Can I legally do that without getting into trouble or do I have to do it through my buyer's agent?Ed DyesBaltimoreDear Mr. Dyes:Take a look at the agency contract you signed when you engaged the buyer's agent. The contract will state what obligations you have if you buy a property through another agent or without any agent at all.Most real estate companies use a contract form that provides for an exclusive buyer's agency.
BUSINESS
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Special to The Sun | March 19, 1995
Sure, he sounds smooth on the phone, and her face makes for a nice magnet. But choosing a real estate agent takes more than blind faith in self-promotion.First-time homebuyers can't afford to ignore the referrals and recommendations of satisfied friends and relatives who have been there.It's always wise to rely on the tried and true, according to Barbara Nock, manager of O'Conor, Piper & Flynn in Towson/Lutherville. "I don't think there's any magic [to choosing an agent]," she said. "Make sure they're professional; make sure they've been in the business and perhaps have continuing education designations [which show]
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
For the homebuyer, it sounds like a deal, hiring a real estate agent who looks out for buyers, not sellers, and having the seller pay.Buyers need someone on their side when making what's often the biggest purchase of a lifetime, agents who represent buyers advise.But real estate brokers warn that buyers first should understand the contractual obligation they're creating.For instance, if a client hires a buyer's agent, then finds a home to buy on his own, he still owes the agent a commission.
BUSINESS
By Daniel B. Wroblewski and Daniel B. Wroblewski,Real Estate Editor | January 1, 1995
You finally understand the seller disclosure law. So what happens?The state, city and counties come out with another set of rules for the new year, confusing buyers, sellers and agents anew.The most far-reaching of these is the "dual agency" law, which will change the way every agent deals with buyers. The law requires greater disclosure to buyers about whom their agent represents and sets rules for companies that wish to represent both the buyer and seller in a transaction -- known as dual agency.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 1, 1996
THE CLINTON administration is wrestling with an explosive issue that threatens to redefine what real estate agents can -- and cannot -- tell prospective homebuyers about the racial or ethnic characteristics of neighborhoods.Since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, realty agents nationwide have been trained to avoid discussions of racial or other features of neighborhoods that may be covered by the law's anti-bias protections.But a controversial pre-election opinion letter from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | August 18, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel:What's the difference between a buyer's agent and a seller's agent? And what is dual agency?Jeffrey Bowman Forest Hill Dear Mr. Bowman:Maryland's law governing real estate disclose information took effect last year. The new law specifies requirements and the details of both disclosure and consent forms that are required on all sale and lease of real estate -- involving one to four single-family residential dwelling units.The disclosure forms are available from the Maryland Real Estate Commission -- (410)
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | January 17, 2007
Scott Kapinos Real estate agent Pat Hiban Real Estate Group/Keller Williams Select Realty, Ellicott City Salary --$123,000 a year Age --45 Years on the job --20 How he got started --Kapinos was working for a printing company in 1985 when he purchased his first home. He decided to give the real estate business a try because he enjoyed the process, realized Howard County was an up-and-coming area and had a business background. He sold his first home within a few weeks. The first year, he sold 15 homes.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | March 18, 2006
Apending lawsuit in Washington's Maryland suburbs is focusing fresh light on a growing problem: Realty agents are failing to disclose whom they represent in transactions - even where state laws require them to do so in writing at their first substantive meeting with a potential client. According to new research by the National Association of Realtors, just 30 percent of all buyers during 2005 received disclosures about representation from their agents at their first meeting. Nearly half of all first-time buyers either received no disclosures anytime during the sales transaction or were unaware of whether they did or did not. To the Realtor association's top lawyer, general counsel Laurie Janik, this is very bad news.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | May 5, 2002
The law of supply and demand is beginning to lower real estate commissions in Howard County and that doesn't sit well with many agents. Creig Northrop, the No. 1 agent for Long & Foster Real Estate Inc. in Howard County, is miffed that some agents are negotiating 5 percent, or even 4 percent, commissions instead of the traditional 6 percent. Commissions are typically split evenly between brokers who represent the seller and the buyer. Consequently, when the seller's agent lowers the commission, it is also lowered for the agent of the buyer.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998
Dear Mr. Azrael:I was wondering if I could buy another property even though I have a buyer's agent or if I can look at other properties if I have a buyer's agent.I've been looking at other properties with other agents even though I have a buyer's agent. Can I legally do that without getting into trouble or do I have to do it through my buyer's agent?Ed DyesBaltimoreDear Mr. Dyes:Take a look at the agency contract you signed when you engaged the buyer's agent. The contract will state what obligations you have if you buy a property through another agent or without any agent at all.Most real estate companies use a contract form that provides for an exclusive buyer's agency.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 1, 1996
THE CLINTON administration is wrestling with an explosive issue that threatens to redefine what real estate agents can -- and cannot -- tell prospective homebuyers about the racial or ethnic characteristics of neighborhoods.Since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, realty agents nationwide have been trained to avoid discussions of racial or other features of neighborhoods that may be covered by the law's anti-bias protections.But a controversial pre-election opinion letter from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | August 18, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel:What's the difference between a buyer's agent and a seller's agent? And what is dual agency?Jeffrey Bowman Forest Hill Dear Mr. Bowman:Maryland's law governing real estate disclose information took effect last year. The new law specifies requirements and the details of both disclosure and consent forms that are required on all sale and lease of real estate -- involving one to four single-family residential dwelling units.The disclosure forms are available from the Maryland Real Estate Commission -- (410)
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | March 18, 2006
Apending lawsuit in Washington's Maryland suburbs is focusing fresh light on a growing problem: Realty agents are failing to disclose whom they represent in transactions - even where state laws require them to do so in writing at their first substantive meeting with a potential client. According to new research by the National Association of Realtors, just 30 percent of all buyers during 2005 received disclosures about representation from their agents at their first meeting. Nearly half of all first-time buyers either received no disclosures anytime during the sales transaction or were unaware of whether they did or did not. To the Realtor association's top lawyer, general counsel Laurie Janik, this is very bad news.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | May 14, 1995
Q: What's the difference between a buyer's agent and a seller's agent? And what is dual agency?James Mulligan, JoppaA: Maryland's new law requiring real estate agents to disclose information to the public took effect Jan. 1. The new law specifies disclosure requirements and the details of bothdisclosure and consent forms that are required on all sale and lease of real estate -- involving one to four single-family residential dwelling units.The disclosure forms are available from the Maryland Real Estate Commission -- (410)
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | May 14, 1995
Q: What's the difference between a buyer's agent and a seller's agent? And what is dual agency?James Mulligan, JoppaA: Maryland's new law requiring real estate agents to disclose information to the public took effect Jan. 1. The new law specifies disclosure requirements and the details of bothdisclosure and consent forms that are required on all sale and lease of real estate -- involving one to four single-family residential dwelling units.The disclosure forms are available from the Maryland Real Estate Commission -- (410)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
For the homebuyer, it sounds like a deal, hiring a real estate agent who looks out for buyers, not sellers, and having the seller pay.Buyers need someone on their side when making what's often the biggest purchase of a lifetime, agents who represent buyers advise.But real estate brokers warn that buyers first should understand the contractual obligation they're creating.For instance, if a client hires a buyer's agent, then finds a home to buy on his own, he still owes the agent a commission.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.