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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 12, 2000
"DO YOU feel you don't have enough money to buy stocks or mutual funds?" asks Better Investing. "People who feel that way probably do have enough. They should take a closer look at expenses. For example, eat breakfast at home instead of buying that bagel and coffee. Pack a lunch instead of going to the cafeteria. You don't need much money to start. Many companies allow you to invest small amounts regularly through dividend-reinvestment plans." RESOLUTION: Kiplinger's Personal Finance Advisor says, "Right after New Year's Day, make a checklist of financial information for your family in case something happens to you -- bank and brokerage accounts, credit card numbers, insurance policies, etc. Give copies to your spouse, lawyer and whomever you've given power of attorney."
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 11, 2009
American Originals 9 p.m. [CNBC] The documentary looks at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, focusing partly (left) on how the high-priced pups are pampered. And at least for this hour, the network won't be advising you to buy stocks that will end up tanking.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 13, 1991
Drifting lower in sluggish trading, stocks eased 24 points yesterday. The Dow Jones average closed at 2,961.98 with one local broker commenting, "there's no avalanche of selling, just a lack of buying enthusiasm."MARKET WATCH (in proportion received): "Without question, the major concern is the lofty valuation level of the most popular stocks. The S&P 500 and DJ 30 industrials stand at 18 times earnings, well above the market's normal 12 to 15 P/E range. And dividends are now 3.2 percent vs. seven percent in 1982."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Gauged by historical profits, stocks were cheaper last week than they have been in years. Maybe decades. At last week's Dow Jones industrial average close of 8,852, the 30 companies that constitute the index were selling for an average of 11 times their earnings for the past 12 months. Contrast that with the 27-times earnings that the Dow sold for in 2000. If today's investors thought trailing corporate profits were worth that much, the Dow would be almost 22,000, not less than 9,000. Amid overblown fears of a new Depression, some stocks already trade for Depression-cheap prices, Jason Zweig wrote recently in The Wall Street Journal.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 27, 1993
The Dow Jones industrial average surged 23.53 points yesterday to close at an all-time high of 3,540.16, eclipsing the previous peak by 17 points. Sharply lower interest rates sparked the advance as investors shunned low-yielding CDs, T-bills, etc., and plowed money into stocks.WALL ST. WISDOM: "Don't worry about government economic reports, the Federal Reserve Board Index, the Consumer Confidence figures, the level of the stock market, the direction of interest rates or anything like that.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 6, 1994
Bill is right about yuppie greedheads. It takes one to know one.Grit your teeth and say it: Arkansas is No. 1.The Maryland budget has no new taxes. Don for president!Be patriotic. Buy stocks.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 11, 2009
American Originals 9 p.m. [CNBC] The documentary looks at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, focusing partly (left) on how the high-priced pups are pampered. And at least for this hour, the network won't be advising you to buy stocks that will end up tanking.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 6, 2000
Are you thinking ahead to your New Year's financial resolutions? Kiplinger's Personal Finance, January, suggests: "Take time to talk about your next 10 to 20 years together - seeing the kids off to college, cars you'd like to drive, vacations you'd like to take, when you want to retire, etc. "Inventory everything. Take photos or video tape of jewelry, furniture, cars, valuable papers, electronic devices, etc. List numbers of brokerage accounts, insurance policies, employee benefits and stock options.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 2, 1998
What mix of stocks and bonds should you own?"People with 15 or more years until retirement should have at least as much in bonds as in stocks," says Charles Clough, Merrill Lynch strategist. "The total return -- yield plus gain -- will be better for bonds than for stocks this year and in 1999."Want to buy the favorite stocks of the top-performing mutual fund managers? The list includes General Motors Corp., Charles Schwab Corp., Family Golf Centers and Storage Technology Corp. (Kiplinger's Magazine.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | July 24, 1998
HOW DO YOU make -- and save -- money in a "down" market?John Rothchild, author of "The Bear Book: Survive and Profit in Ferocious Markets," advises:"Re-allocate your assets. No one should be anywhere near 100 percent in stocks, especially in this high market. Cautious investors should keep 50 percent in stocks, 30 percent in bonds and 20 percent in cash."Cut back on aggressive growth stocks with high price-to-earnings ratios and buy stocks that do best in tough times. Examples: consumer goods, electric utilities, household products and foods.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,chicago tribune | October 12, 2008
Starting out in investing right now might seem irrational, but many investment experts consider this an opportune time. Financial trauma produces long-term bargains, if you can cope with uncertainty. You'll move gradually into a market that has punished good companies along with the bad, which is the foundation of a value-oriented strategy. "These ... opportunities represent a great time if you are a long-term investor and fundamentally believe in our free-enterprise system," said Mark Brown, a certified financial planner with Brown & Tedstrom in Denver.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Your Money | June 8, 2008
Looks can be deceiving, and analysts say that might be the case with midcap stocks now. As a group, medium-size companies look like clear winners in recent months. Since the five-month plunge in the stock market that ended March 10, midcap stocks have climbed about 18 percent. That's almost twice as much as the Standard & Poor's 500 index of large companies, which is up 10 percent in the same period. So an investor might conclude that a trend is in place - the type that happens frequently after the stock market has gone through a rough stretch.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2008
Investors actually relaxed a little last week. After a fearful couple of days in markets throughout the world, investors on Wednesday enjoyed the relief of a turnaround of more than 600 points in the Dow Jones industrial average in a day. Suddenly, with stocks down about 20 percent in markets from France to India, the surprise rebound changed analysts' chatter from fear to buying opportunities. It was a reminder to those ready to flee stocks that it is virtually impossible to guess when the market will be cruel or kind to investors.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 6, 2007
BEIJING -- The state-controlled firm PetroChina toppled Exxon Mobil Corp. from its perch yesterday as the world's most highly valued company as eager Chinese investors briefly pushed its value to $1.1 trillion. Analysts said the landmark event underscored China's growth and the hunger of cash-laden savers to invest in China's stock markets despite warnings of a bubble. PetroChina's capitalization rocketed to $1.1 trillion early yesterday when its shares began selling on the Shanghai A-share market, later retreating to a value of about $980 billion.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKS JARVIS and GAIL MARKS JARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 21, 2007
It's called "playing the bounce," a stock trading strategy that sounds like light entertainment, but isn't. This time of year, traders try to take advantage of the tendency by fund managers to dump some of their ugliest stocks. The fund managers cleanse stock portfolios before the end of the year so unsightly stocks - such as homebuilders and mortgage companies this year - don't show up in year-end reports and scare off investors. Also, by selling losers in October, mutual funds reduce taxes clients must pay, offsetting the capital gains that winning stocks would otherwise leave at tax time.
NEWS
By Rolfe Winkler | March 8, 2007
Lots of people are asking what's happening to the stock market lately. Are we in for a crash or a protracted bear market? No one, of course, can say for sure. But an understanding of some of the key factors that have driven stock prices up the last few years suggests stocks are headed down from here. An interesting graphic in The Wall Street Journal two weeks ago, right before stocks fell so hard, showed that all of the world's top 20 stock markets were at yearly or all-time highs. Everybody was buying stocks.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | May 20, 1998
HAVE YOU considered "contrarian" investing?"Most stock portfolios don't outperform the S&P 500 index when investors chase winners," says highly successful adviser David Dreman. Mr. Dreman's High Return Equity Fund is ranked No. 1 among all stock income funds, according to Lipper Analytical Services.He adds, "The problem is that the big profits have already been made on many well-known stocks, as attractive as they seem. Many offer little opportunity for further gain."How does the average investor avoid chasing overpriced high fliers?
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 6, 2007
BEIJING -- The state-controlled firm PetroChina toppled Exxon Mobil Corp. from its perch yesterday as the world's most highly valued company as eager Chinese investors briefly pushed its value to $1.1 trillion. Analysts said the landmark event underscored China's growth and the hunger of cash-laden savers to invest in China's stock markets despite warnings of a bubble. PetroChina's capitalization rocketed to $1.1 trillion early yesterday when its shares began selling on the Shanghai A-share market, later retreating to a value of about $980 billion.
BUSINESS
By JEFF BROWN and JEFF BROWN,THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | August 22, 2006
The problem: You have a stable of stocks that aren't going anywhere and you're tempted to sell to shift the proceeds to a nice, safe certificate of deposit earning a tidy 5 percent or so - three times the rate of a couple of years ago. But selling those stocks might trigger a capital-gains tax. And it would mean putting that cash on the sidelines, defying all the experts' claims that stocks are the most profitable long-term investment. If only there were a way to squeeze a little more return out of those stocks without dumping them.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 25, 2005
Many investors won't be boasting about their investment returns this year. Among the major stock market barometers, Standard & Poor's 500 index is up about 4 percent this year, while the Dow Jones industrial average is flat as a tabletop. Not everyone, though, has had such ho-hum returns. Some of the best investment clubs - groups of average investors who pool their money and know-how to buy stocks - regularly outperform the market. The principles that guide them aren't flashy or revolutionary, but basic strategies that have been around for decades because they tend to work.
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