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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- New hope for Senate agreement on health care reform was offered yesterday by a bipartisan group of moderates who are developing a plan to require individuals, rather than employers, to buy insurance.The group, led by Sen. John H. Chafee, a Rhode Island Republican, plans to unveil its compromise proposal tomorrow before the Senate Finance Committee. Other legislators on the deadlocked panel hope that the Chafee plan will provide a basis for formal committee action beginning next week.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Continued technical problems with the state's health insurance exchange have prompted another delay of the opening of a site for small businesses to buy health plans. Citing the problems on marylandhealthconnection.gov, which include sluggish navigation and error messages, state officials also postponed when the exchange would begin collecting payments from people who have already bought plans. The state exchange is where uninsured Marylanders — estimated to number 800,000 — can buy health plans under the Affordable Care Act. The delays were announced at a meeting Friday of the board that oversees the exchange.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
Every year at about the same time, Lynne King braces for the arduous task of figuring out how to continue offering her employees health insurance even as premiums skyrocket and revenues don't. "Every time it comes up for renewal, it's a new set of nightmares," said King, who runs GAAP Software with her husband. "The premiums go up so high, and then we have to re-examine what we're going to do and how we're going to make it happen." This year, King hired a 21-year-old to bring down the average age of employees at the company.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
The federal and state governments are spending millions in advertising the insurance exchanges in Maryland. What they are not saying is that the only people who need go to the exchanges for insurance are those that need subsidies. People can go directly to an insurance company or agent and receive insurance quotes of the same type, same premium and in some cases, look at coverage not available through the exchanges, all with no medical questions and available with no preexisting condition restrictions.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | August 12, 2007
I'm going to Europe for six months. Is there any travel insurance I can obtain for that long? Before looking for travel medical insurance, call your current provider and ask what you're covered for when traveling overseas. It's possible you may not need to purchase additional insurance. However, if you don't have coverage or want to make sure you are covered for such situations as a trip interruption or emergency evacuation, you can buy insurance for up to three years depending on which company you choose.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
At the State House, enthusiasm for health care reform has been tempered by the realities of a recession and starkly declining tax revenues. A further expansion of Medicaid eligibility will likely be put on hold. Ditto for an ambitious plan to lower health care costs and extend insurance coverage through a fund financed by payroll and sin taxes. But there is one idea that may advance despite the economic woes, and it could mean better health care for thousands of Marylanders without great cost to the average taxpayer.
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | September 25, 2007
There's growing bipartisan support among presidential aspirants for requiring Americans to buy health insurance as a component of a health reform package. That's a superficially attractive idea that would seem to simultaneously eliminate problems for the uninsured who can't pay needed care and for providers who raise rates on others because of unpaid bills. But how will the new system deal with those who fail to buy the required insurance? There will be more than a few of them. From one perspective, this strategy is not unlike saying that the federal budget would be easily balanced if we all paid the taxes we owed.
NEWS
March 8, 2007
It's not health insurance the American people want. What they truly want is for someone else to step forward to foot the bill. Their goal is to pay about $500 out of their own pockets every year, and then have someone else, either their employer or the taxpayers, be responsible for everything else. ... [A] recent survey revealed that young Americans would rather pay their cell phone bill than use that money to buy insurance. These young workers said that they will just wait to get health insurance until they get a job where it is included in a benefits package.
NEWS
By New York Times Service | May 12, 1993
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -- Hillary Rodham Clinton gave a televised preview last night of the health care campaign she heads, assuring West Virginians with an array of health insurance problems that their concerns will be met when the Clinton administration unveils its proposals next month.In a statewide town meeting conducted by satellite, Mrs. Clinton and one of the state's Democratic senators, John D. Rockefeller IV, quizzed a number of carefully selected West Virginians who typified the problems of the uninsured, of small businesses struggling to afford insurance, and of hospitals and other providers trying to give care without reimbursement.
TRAVEL
By Alfred Borcover and Alfred Borcover,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2003
Here's one thing to keep in mind when you book your own vacation via the Internet: If you inadvertently screw things up, you have no one to blame or scream at. It's the best reason I can think of to turn to a travel agent, especially if your trip is complex - multiple destinations, carriers, hotels, tour operators you're unfamiliar with. You get the picture. Another thing to keep in mind: Ignore those spam e-mails that congratulate you for winning a free trip. Do you believe in the tooth fairy?
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Almost 2,400 Marylanders have bought insurance in the first 17 days that the state's new health care exchange has been open, according to new data released by the Maryland Health Connection. The exchange had a bumpy start, with users experiencing delays and technical troubles. And while officials say the troubles are still being addressed, they say the number of people using the site has ramped up. The total number of enrollees has doubled in the last week. Officials from the exchange, where the uninsured and underinsured can shop for coverage, also reported Friday that there have been more than 261,000 unique visitors to the website and more than 25,100 calls to the call centers.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
County officials are urging residents to purchase insurance policies if their homes have recently been added to newly redrawn flood insurance rate maps. The Federal Emergency Management Agency worked with Maryland's Department of the Environment to overhaul the statewide maps, which show which homes and businesses are most susceptible to flooding, and thus are generally required to buy flood insurance . In Howard County, the maps have not changed since 1986. Because of better technology, an additional 360 residences and 130 other structures near rivers and streams will be identified as being at risk of flooding, unless their owners appeal.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
It was 1942 when the U.S. Supreme Court decided that Congress could influence wheat prices by telling farmers how much they could grow. So the idea that Congress mandate that all Americans buy health insurance isn't that far-fetched and has legal precedent, argues Leslie Meltzer Henry, assistant professor of law at the University of Maryland and associate faculty member at Johns Hopkins' Berman Institute of Bioethics. Henry spoke to a room full of Johns Hopkins faculty, students and visitors Monday as the Supreme Court began three days of oral arguments in Washington on the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama's landmark health care law. Henry is one of many lawyers, bioethicists, politicians and ordinary Americans who have a strong belief in how the court will — or should — rule on the case.
NEWS
By Cedric Dark | August 24, 2011
There are pros and cons of using an individual mandate for health insurance as a policy lever to promote universal health care. From a pure policy standpoint, the argument for is simple. To get rid of "free riders" in the medical system and improve the efficiencies of the health insurance marketplace, something is necessary to compel everyone to purchase an insurance plan. An individual insurance mandate, while imperfect, is one such tool. Conceived by conservative thinkers Mark Pauly and Stuart Butler in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the individual mandate now faces attack from many who formerly supported it. The individual mandate would function much like others - such as that for car insurance - to compel people to purchase a product they otherwise might avoid.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
Health care reform will not be fixed by mandating health insurance. Why? I have a blue folder documenting all the medical bills the insurance does not cover because it is the patient's responsibility! We still have a lot of medical bills with insurance. Could it be worse? Yes. Could it be better? Oh yes, but this is not the reform we need! I have a master's degree. I am not offered insurance at my job. I won't qualify for assistance. I can't afford insurance. I have three children.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
At the State House, enthusiasm for health care reform has been tempered by the realities of a recession and starkly declining tax revenues. A further expansion of Medicaid eligibility will likely be put on hold. Ditto for an ambitious plan to lower health care costs and extend insurance coverage through a fund financed by payroll and sin taxes. But there is one idea that may advance despite the economic woes, and it could mean better health care for thousands of Marylanders without great cost to the average taxpayer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - After six months of work, Senate Republicans yesterday proposed a wide range of tax credits, subsidies and discounts to provide health insurance to millions of Americans and to improve health care for those who remain uninsured. The proposals, though less ambitious than plans advanced by Democrats, suggest that Republican leaders have heard the calls of many families and small businesses alarmed at the soaring costs of health insurance and health care. Sen. Judd Gregg of New Hampshire, the chairman of a 12-member panel that developed the proposals, said, "The uninsured are not a monolithic group.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- New hope for Senate agreement on health care reform was offered yesterday by a bipartisan group of moderates who are developing a plan to require individuals, rather than employers, to buy insurance.The group, led by Sen. John H. Chafee, a Rhode Island Republican, plans to unveil its compromise proposal tomorrow before the Senate Finance Committee. Other legislators on the deadlocked panel hope that the Chafee plan will provide a basis for formal committee action beginning next week.
BUSINESS
By Dan Serra and Dan Serra,McClatchy-Tribune | August 3, 2008
Individuals who find themselves a victim of a layoff or find a new job that doesn't offer health insurance face a difficult task in deciding how to replace that insurance. While the options may be more expensive than a subsidized corporate plan, some do offer tax benefits an employer cannot. The first option is to continue your previous employer's insurance through COBRA. While this maintains your coverage, it's expensive, as you now must pay the full premium and employers usually tack on an extra 2 percent to cover administrative fees.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | December 26, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton is on the attack against her main rival, charging that Sen. Barack Obama's health plan would leave millions of Americans without medical protection while hers provides coverage to all. The assertion, flatly rejected by the Obama campaign, rests on a pivotal difference between the two Democratic presidential candidates' health proposals. Clinton says she wants the government to require all citizens to buy insurance or face a penalty. Obama relies on a mandate for children only, and instead emphasizes ways to make coverage more affordable.
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