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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A new manufacturing documentary that will get an advance screening in Baltimore this week suggests that average Americans aren't powerless to stop job loss in the sector. It's a simple and surprisingly old message that has seen a resurgence since the rough recession: Buy American. The independent filmmakers behind "American Made Movie" - being released Aug. 30 - say they're not protectionists and are happy to hear about foreign-owned manufacturers with factories in this country.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A new manufacturing documentary that will get an advance screening in Baltimore this week suggests that average Americans aren't powerless to stop job loss in the sector. It's a simple and surprisingly old message that has seen a resurgence since the rough recession: Buy American. The independent filmmakers behind "American Made Movie" - being released Aug. 30 - say they're not protectionists and are happy to hear about foreign-owned manufacturers with factories in this country.
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NEWS
By Matthew L. Wald and Matthew L. Wald,New York Times News Service J | January 24, 1992
Maybe it was President Bush's mixed success in Japan, or the Japanese official who said that American auto workers were lazy and illiterate. Maybe it is the deep slump in Detroit.But all of a sudden, companies around the United States are saying it would be good for America to be good to GM, and they are offering inducements to their employees to buy from General Motors, Chrysler or Ford.Some, groping to define just what constitutes an American car, are authorizing employees to buy autos made at the Honda plant in Marysville, Ohio, or Nissan's factory in Smyrna, Tenn.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Her affinity for sleeveless frocks has caused a buying frenzy and inspired people to turn to workouts for toning their arms. She has become a highly coveted canvas for fashion designers and retailers. She steals the scene in pointed-toe flats, colored cardigans, brooches, and fit and flared dresses. First lady Michelle Obama's sense of style has captured fashion followers, and in the process made ensemble-gazing a national pastime. A regular fixture on best-dressed lists from Vogue magazine and observers such as Tim Gunn, Obama continues to make her mark.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun Richard H. P. Sia of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | May 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States is growing too dependent on foreign companies for its weapons systems, Representative Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md.-2nd, testified yesterday, predicting dire consequences for national security and the economy.The Baltimore County Republican, joined by other lawmakers, business and union leaders, came before a House Armed Services subcommittee to back legislation that would prevent the Defense Department from granting blanket waivers to "buy American" laws."How many pacifists -- in other countries -- work on assembly lines feeding our U.S. defense base?"
NEWS
By JAMES McCARTNEY | February 5, 1992
Washington -- Of all the phony issues emerging in national politics none is more misleading than the ''Buy American'' frenzy sweeping the country. It is based on a failure to understand the undeniable benefits of the modern global economy, as well as a misguided sense of patriotism.There are few more certain ways for Americans to shoot themselves in the foot economically and to raise their own cost of living than to try to isolate themselves from foreign pTC competition. And there is no more certain way to inflame international tensions than to encourage Japan bashing.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | March 15, 1992
Just ask Peter Torino.Mr. Torino, a television advertising salesman in Rapid City, S.D., wanted to buy an American word processor. He spotted one made by Brother. It had an American flag on the box bearing the words "Made in the USA."He bought it. Ironically, he needed it to type his own idea for "flagging" all consumer goods. Each product, he wrote, should carry three flags showing the nationality of the owner, the place of manufacture and the origin of most of the components.He sent his idea to Brother, believing it would put the Stars and Stripes on the company's boxes three times.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | February 19, 1992
THE GENERAL WHO said that war is hell wasn't entirely correct. We're in a war right now, and it isn't all that terrible. At times, it's even fun.That's because we're fighting it with bumper stickers instead of bullets, bombast instead of bombs.I'm talking, of course, about the great war of words with Japan and the growing "Buy American" crusade.The fighting really broke out in earnest when some crotchety old Japanese politician made sneering remarks about much of our work force not knowing how to read or write and being lazy and greedy.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 13, 1992
Two weeks ago, Richard Berman looks at a damaged Pontiac that's arrived in his frame and body shop and realizes this car will need major surgery if it is ever again to bask in the glory of a Jones Falls Expressway rush hour.Thus begins a simple process, repeated many times each week: Call a local General Motors dealer, make sure they've got the right parts, and have them sent to his Oakleaf Avenue repair shop.And thus also begins a very complex process: complex mechanically, certainly, but also complex geographically and politically.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 24, 1992
DETROIT -- A Chevrolet salesman who questioned the value of the "Buy American" movement in a nationally televised interview has been dismissed by his boss, who says his customers are angry about the comments in the interview.The episode highlights concerns over the popularity of foreign brands and the resulting job loss among U.S. automakers. It also put the salesman, 31-year-old Matt Darcy, at the center of the debate between those who believe buying a domestic car is a duty and those offended by efforts to coerce consumers.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | July 6, 2007
Bruce Wasserstein, the chairman of Lazard Ltd., has agreed to sell The American Lawyer magazine and the rest of his legal and real estate publishing business to Incisive Media PLC of the United Kingdom for $630 million. Wasserstein, a former lawyer who built his career advising on acquisitions, and investors paid $63 million for American Lawyer and $200 million for National Law Publishing Co. in 1997 to form the company that is now ALM. Incisive said in a statement yesterday that it will pay cash for ALM, which publishes 33 U.S. magazines and newspapers for the legal and property professions.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE | December 29, 2005
Many NBA players skew European when picking their ties and shoes but buy American when it comes to their suits. It's not patriotism, though. It's practicality. "It don't look right for a guy 6-9 or 6-11 to be in Versace, Armani," says Washington Wizards' forward Jared Jeffries, who wears a size 17 shoe. "Italian designers, that European cut, it looks crazy. It's too slim." Size is one reason why most ball players, no matter their personal styles, have their suits custom made. One favorite among players is Elevee Custom Clothing out of Van Nuys, Calif.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2002
Walk through any mall and you still see them: the flag T-shirts, the patriotic picnicware, the USA-emblazoned tongue rings. In post-Sept. 11 America, there are enough bright-starred, broad-striped products to stretch from sea to shining sea. But if you're tired of Old Glory being used as a marketing tool -- or stuck on people's backsides or dangling from key rings -- take heart. Although the stores are filled with red, white and blue for the fourth of July holiday, the public's interest in outward signs of patriotism may be waning -- being replaced, perhaps, by a more enduring interest in things American.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2001
LONDON - In the biggest trans-Atlantic insurance deal ever, Britain's Prudential PLC said yesterday that it had agreed to buy the American General Corp., the second-largest life insurer in the United States, in an all-stock deal that it valued at $26.5 billion. The deal would propel the British group into the big league of global insurers. But as stock markets declined around the world yesterday, investors punished Prudential's shares, which fell by as much as 14 percent, cutting into the value of the deal.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 20, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- Westinghouse Electric Corp. agreed to buy the broadcast operations of American Radio Systems Corp. yesterday for $2.6 billion, giving the nation's largest radio station owner a stronger grip on markets outside the top 10.Westinghouse, which also owns the CBS television network, plans to pay $44 a share in cash, or $1.6 billion, and assume $1 billion in debt for the fifth-largest radio company's 98 stations. Before the transaction is completed, American Radio will spin off its radio and telephone tower business.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Aiming to strengthen its Baltimore banking business, Crestar Financial Corp. said yesterday that it agreed to buy American National Bancorp Inc., a Baltimore-based thrift, for $72.9 million.The merger would add 10 American National branches in the Baltimore region to Crestar's 35 Maryland branches. "It's a building block for Crestar," said David M. West, an analyst for Richmond-based Davenport & Co.He estimated that the deal would boost Crestar's market share in the Baltimore area from about 5 percent to 6 percent.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | March 18, 1991
The state of Maryland and Baltimore City are looking for ways to change their "Buy Cheap" policies to "Buy American," following complaints about Chinese caps for highway workers and TV sets in City Hall stamped "Made in Japan."A City Council bill introduced by 15 members a week ago would give preference, on items costing more than $300, to U.S.-made products. There would be exceptions for items not readily available from domestic manufacturers.The city law department has expressed an unfavorable opinion of the bill, arguing that it would violate the requirement for competitive bidding and contract award to the lowest responsible bidder.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Aiming to strengthen its Baltimore banking business, Crestar Financial Corp. said yesterday that it agreed to buy American National Bancorp Inc., a Baltimore-based thrift, for $72.9 million.The merger would add 10 American National branches in the Baltimore region to Crestar's 35 Maryland branches. "It's a building block for Crestar," said David M. West, an analyst for Richmond-based Davenport & Co.He estimated that the deal would boost Crestar's market share in the Baltimore area from about 5 percent to 6 percent.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
O'Conor Piper & Flynn Realtors, the Baltimore area's largest realty firm, expects to double its size in Howard County today when it acquires a Columbia-based competitor.In the biggest merger for the independently owned company in more than a decade, OPF will buy the assets of 10-year-old American Properties Inc. -- Howard County's largest independent real estate company -- and take over offices in Columbia and Ellicott City and in Eldersburg in Carroll County, James P. O'Conor, OPF chairman, said yesterday.
NEWS
By SUZANNE WOOTON and SUZANNE WOOTON,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
United Airlines said yesterday that it is considering buying USAir, a move that would give the nation's largest airline access to valuable East Coast routes but one that raises concerns for BWI, whose future has long been linked to USAir.The Arlington, Va.-based carrier, by far the largest airline at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, confirmed that it was negotiating with United and said it also has held preliminary discussions with American Airlines, the nation's second-largest airline.
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