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By Julius Westheimer | December 20, 1996
TODAY, we look both backward and ahead for clues to investment success.Every re-elected president since Andrew Jackson in 1832, except Ronald Reagan, witnessed a stock decline the next year. A 49 percent plunge followed Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 1936 second-term victory. Richard Nixon presided over a 45 percent drop.But history shows that most bull markets are killed by inflation, rising interest rates and earnings declines. Happily, we have none of those today. And the Dow Jones price-to-earnings ratio stands at a reasonable 18.In addition, baby boomers are putting more money in stocks than ever.
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BUSINESS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
NEW YORK -- A federal judge set a $500,000 bond yesterday for a former executive at a Maryland technology company who has been charged with manipulating stock option grants to allow top employees to lock in unlawful stock gains and exaggerated bonuses. Flanked by two attorneys and watched by her husband in the courtroom gallery, Carole D. Argo, 46, a former chief financial officer, president and chief operating officer of SafeNet Inc. in Belcamp, in Harford County, entered a not guilty plea in U.S. District Court in Manhattan on charges of securities fraud and conspiracy.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 17, 1999
MANY PEOPLE ask if they should buy a stock when the company announces a stock split.Never buy a stock just because it's going to split. But if it's a good company and you buy the stock before it splits, you will save on commissions and probably show a profit, too.The AAII Journal says: "Stocks of firms that announce splits generally move higher at the time of the announcement, generally advancing 3.5 to 4.5 percent. Investors feel a split announcement is a positive signal about future earnings.
BUSINESS
By JEFF BROWN and JEFF BROWN,THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | August 22, 2006
The problem: You have a stable of stocks that aren't going anywhere and you're tempted to sell to shift the proceeds to a nice, safe certificate of deposit earning a tidy 5 percent or so - three times the rate of a couple of years ago. But selling those stocks might trigger a capital-gains tax. And it would mean putting that cash on the sidelines, defying all the experts' claims that stocks are the most profitable long-term investment. If only there were a way to squeeze a little more return out of those stocks without dumping them.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 30, 1999
ARE YOU waiting for a sharp market correction before you invest? Don't, according to financial adviser David Dreman. "Don't wait for a severe setback to find good `value stock' buys. Look for stocks with relatively low price-earnings ratios, above-average dividend yield and low price-to-book value ratios," he advises.WORKING LONGER? "Too many Americans feel retirement will be a breeze. Most baby boomers want to retire by age 60, haven't saved much, doubt they'll get many Social Security benefits -- but expect to live very well in retirement.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 7, 1999
NOTES ABOUT your money and investments:Baltimore Gas and Electric stock, now Constellation Energy Group Inc., is ranked Group 2 -- Good-to-High Quality -- in Argus Research Electric Utility Rankings. Potomac Electric Power Co., our neighbor to the south, is listed under Group 1 -- High Quality."You don't have to take Social Security at age 65. You get larger benefits if you apply later, whether working or retired." (Kiplinger Washington Letter)"A charitable remainder trust is useful in financial and estate planning.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 29, 1998
HERE are money-savers and money-makers:GO ALL OUT: Be sure to "max out" in your 401(k) plan, giving you the opportunity to save for retirement before taxes are withheld. And your 401(k) investments compound much faster than in a personal account because you pay no taxes until you withdraw money.Business Week, Aug. 3, comments, "Oh, how we love our 401 (k)s! The average 401(k) account now tops $50,000, 19 percent more than in 1997 and 82 percent more than in 1994. Fidelity Investments says that 85 percent of its clients' eligible employees have one."
BUSINESS
September 12, 2004
Never buy a stock and forget about it, no matter how great you believe the company might be or how sentimental you feel about it. Over the years, I've spoken to dozens of surviving spouses or children who hold worthless or soon-to-be worthless shares because they had blind confidence in the investment prowess of their dearly departed. "My Fred knew investments and cared about us," one elderly woman told me. "That's why I kept that stock." Well, if Fred were still around he'd have dumped that turkey of a stock because he undoubtedly kept up on the prospects and prices of his investments.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | November 21, 2001
IF YOUR plans for an early and comfortable retirement were dashed - and your 401(k) turned into a 201(k) - you may be in a panic," says Forbes. "But there are things that 50- and 60-ish folks can do to salvage their futures."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 27, 1997
MIDYEAR money-making and money-saving suggestions:LATER YEARS: "You can nearly triple your retirement savings by buying 15-year zero-coupon Treasury bonds. Unlike most bonds, zeros' pay interest only at maturity. At the current 7 percent yield, every 35 cents invested in a 15-year 'zero' will climb to $1.00 when the security matures in 2012."Caution: Hold 'zeros' in tax-sheltered accounts or you'll pay taxes annually on the 'earned interest,' which is reinvested twice a year." (Steven Leuthold, market strategist)
BUSINESS
September 12, 2004
Never buy a stock and forget about it, no matter how great you believe the company might be or how sentimental you feel about it. Over the years, I've spoken to dozens of surviving spouses or children who hold worthless or soon-to-be worthless shares because they had blind confidence in the investment prowess of their dearly departed. "My Fred knew investments and cared about us," one elderly woman told me. "That's why I kept that stock." Well, if Fred were still around he'd have dumped that turkey of a stock because he undoubtedly kept up on the prospects and prices of his investments.
BUSINESS
By David Kathman and David Kathman,MORNINGSTAR.COM | April 6, 2003
Dear Analyst, I buy a stock, one that is recommended as a good buy. The next day, I check the market to discover that my stock has "overnight" dropped 20 percent, 30 percent, or more! How and why do the big stockholders get the sudden notion to sell out? Where does the information, which I've been denied, come from? A. Unfortunately, this scenario has become all too common over the past couple of years, as a string of corporate scandals has rocked an already jittery market and undermined investor confidence.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | November 21, 2001
IF YOUR plans for an early and comfortable retirement were dashed - and your 401(k) turned into a 201(k) - you may be in a panic," says Forbes. "But there are things that 50- and 60-ish folks can do to salvage their futures."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
Despite yesterday's 436- point loss by the Dow Jones industrial average and the Nasdaq's sinking below 2,000 for the first time in 27 months, market experts say now may be the time for investors to start buying some beaten down stocks. "This is the best sale we've seen in six years," said Chris Yanson, an investment representative with Edward Jones in Towson. "This is a red dot sale." Market experts say there are several sectors where stocks are selling at attractive prices, particularly technology, where shares have been pummeled.
BUSINESS
By William Samuel Rocco and William Samuel Rocco,MORNINGSTAR.COM | July 30, 2000
International-growth fans walloped their miserly rivals in 1998 and 1999. Indeed, the typical growth-heavy fund in the foreign-stock category gained 63 percent last year, whereas the average value-minded entry in the group returned 28 percent, as technology and telecommunication stocks left Old Economy issues in the dust. But foreign bargain hunters have attractive long-term risk/reward profiles, despite their 1998 and 1999 woes. They often outperformed in previous years, so their 10-year annualized returns are similar to those of their growth-oriented rivals.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 17, 1999
MANY PEOPLE ask if they should buy a stock when the company announces a stock split.Never buy a stock just because it's going to split. But if it's a good company and you buy the stock before it splits, you will save on commissions and probably show a profit, too.The AAII Journal says: "Stocks of firms that announce splits generally move higher at the time of the announcement, generally advancing 3.5 to 4.5 percent. Investors feel a split announcement is a positive signal about future earnings.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Watterson and Thomas Watterson,Boston Globe | January 25, 1993
Will it ever end? That's what people who have been holding IBM stock as one of their "safe" investments for many years must be asking themselves.Each week, it seems, International Business Machines Corp. releases more bad news. Last week it was a record-breaking loss of $5.46 billion for the fourth quarter and nearly $5 billion for the year.Now, investors who are still holding IBM shares are asking another question: Why didn't someone tell me it was time to sell this stock?The problem is that almost everyone who has anything to do with investments, including investment bankers, analysts, stockbrokers and financial advisers, spends a lot more time telling people what stocks to buy than telling them what to sell and when.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 30, 1992
Falling 47 points after Fed chief Alan Greenspan appeared negative on further interest rate cuts, the Dow Jones average closed yesterday at 3,224.96. Optimists stated that the 1.4 percent drop was not catastrophic, especially from this high level.MARKET WATCH (in proportion received): "Major emphasis should now be on selling rather than buying." (Geraldine Weiss, Investment Quality Trends). . . . "This is no time for long-term investors to be buying stocks. There may be 100-200 points left on the upside, since stocks always go to extremes, but we're in the 'sell' range.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 30, 1999
ARE YOU waiting for a sharp market correction before you invest? Don't, according to financial adviser David Dreman. "Don't wait for a severe setback to find good `value stock' buys. Look for stocks with relatively low price-earnings ratios, above-average dividend yield and low price-to-book value ratios," he advises.WORKING LONGER? "Too many Americans feel retirement will be a breeze. Most baby boomers want to retire by age 60, haven't saved much, doubt they'll get many Social Security benefits -- but expect to live very well in retirement.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 7, 1999
NOTES ABOUT your money and investments:Baltimore Gas and Electric stock, now Constellation Energy Group Inc., is ranked Group 2 -- Good-to-High Quality -- in Argus Research Electric Utility Rankings. Potomac Electric Power Co., our neighbor to the south, is listed under Group 1 -- High Quality."You don't have to take Social Security at age 65. You get larger benefits if you apply later, whether working or retired." (Kiplinger Washington Letter)"A charitable remainder trust is useful in financial and estate planning.
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