Advertisement
HomeCollectionsButterworth
IN THE NEWS

Butterworth

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 2, 2005
On December 31, 2004, ERNEST N. BUTTERWORTH, JR.; beloved husband of Pamela (nee Ricketts) Butterworth; loving father of Corinne, Cara and Candace; grandfather of Jordan, Jarod and Aidan. Mr. Butterworth will lie in state at St. Francis of Assisi Church, on Monday 10 to 10:30 A.M. the funeral hour. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Baltimore, Inc., 6601 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21204. Arrangements by the Leonard J. Ruck, Inc. Funeral Home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 2, 2005
On December 31, 2004, ERNEST N. BUTTERWORTH, JR.; beloved husband of Pamela (nee Ricketts) Butterworth; loving father of Corinne, Cara and Candace; grandfather of Jordan, Jarod and Aidan. Mr. Butterworth will lie in state at St. Francis of Assisi Church, on Monday 10 to 10:30 A.M. the funeral hour. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Baltimore, Inc., 6601 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21204. Arrangements by the Leonard J. Ruck, Inc. Funeral Home.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,Contributing Writer | October 10, 1992
America's Cup veteran John Kolius and the Nippon America's Cup Challenge's Robert Fry emerged as semifinal winners after a fast and furious day of sailing in brisk winds on the Patapsco River yesterday, and the two will face off shortly after 11 a.m. today in the final round of the 1992 Cadillac Columbus Cup regatta series.New Zealand's Brad Butterworth and France's Bertrand Pace, meanwhile, will meet in a petit final consolation round.Yesterday morning, the 14-flight double round-robin qualifying series came to an end, leaving Kolius and Pace, who had already been assured of slots in the semifinal round by Thursday evening, in first and second places, respectively.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 11, 2003
In the infancy of online mortgage lending, traditional lenders were caught off-guard by upstart companies that offered a simple way to compare loan rates, apply and get a decision quickly. Five years later, nearly every bank and credit union has a Web site where customers can do those things, and many of the pioneer online lenders - such as iOwn and Mortgage.com? - are dead, even if their Web addresses live on. But even with the Internet, closing a loan is complicated, and many borrowers still prefer to entrust the task to someone they can meet face to face.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
The building at Annapolis' worst drug corner is battered and abandoned, riddled with bullet holes and filled with dead roaches. But for the Clay Street community, the two-story brick Butterworth Building is not a lost cause.By April 1, the city will put a police substation in the building at Clay and West Washington streets. Community activists hope to turn the building into a neighborhood outreach center.The Clay Street Improvement Association is working with the city's Planning and Zoning Department to tap government loans so that it can set up shop in the building.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 23, 2000
* Item: Mrs. Butterworth's flavored syrups * What you get: At least 9 servings * Cost: About $3.10 * Preparation time: Pour from bottle * Review: Mrs. Butterworth is obviously aiming her newest syrups at the younger set. The kid-friendly flavors come in break-proof, drip-proof, easy-to-squeeze plastic bottles with sparkling labels. Truth be told, however, your inner child (and who doesn't have an inner child who still loves a big plate full of pancakes or waffles smothered in syrup?
SPORTS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,Contributing Writer | October 7, 1992
Yesterday's light winds off Fort McHenry confounded the top-ranked international match racers taking part in this year's Cadillac Columbus Cup Regatta, causing some upsets in the early standings set on Monday when the double round-robin portion of the regatta began.Despite the difficult conditions, three additional flights were completed in the round-robin series, bringing the total races to five.Olympic silver medalist Kevin Mahaney unexpectedly had to leave the regatta, but was expected to return before its conclusion; in his absence he turned the helm of his team to a crew member, Texan Doug Kern, who also earned a silver medal in the 1992 Olympics as middleman on Mahaney's Soling campaign.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 19, 1995
Washington. -- Do you spend more than one hour a day following the O.J. Simpson murder trial proceedings on television?Has your productivity at home or at work slipped as a result of monitoring the trial?Do you get angry if someone or something interrupts your viewing of the trial?Do you know the names of all the defense and prosecution attorneys?Is the Simpson coverage the first story you read in the newspaper?Do friends and family say that you are too involved in the Simpson-related events?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 8, 2002
I PITY the Towson University mace-maker. Poor, anonymous fellow. One imagines that he was swelling with ideas, the likes of which the mace-making world has not seen since Canadian Rufus E. Butterworth attached a toilet tank float to a length of pipe and presented it for the opening ceremonies of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta in 1906. We can only imagine what scheme of shaft-and-orb the Towson mace-maker might have come up with had plans for the ceremonial utensil not been put on hold.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2003
The philosopher and psychologist William James once said: "We are stereotyped creatures, imitators and copiers of our past selves." Millions of people prove him right every year when they sit down and make their list of New Year's resolutions, then come up miserably short of fulfilling any of them. Why is it so hard to change? Because we're basically programmed -- by our brains, our bodies and the environment in which we live -- to do things the way we did them yesterday. And the day before that.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2003
The philosopher and psychologist William James once said: "We are stereotyped creatures, imitators and copiers of our past selves." Millions of people prove him right every year when they sit down and make their list of New Year's resolutions, then come up miserably short of fulfilling any of them. Why is it so hard to change? Because we're basically programmed -- by our brains, our bodies and the environment in which we live -- to do things the way we did them yesterday. And the day before that.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
Lois Butterworth Reed, an artist, musician and social activist whose integrated Harford County art school for children was attacked by racists during the early 1960s, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Bel Air home. She was 84. Lois Butterworth was born and raised in Douglaston, N.Y., where she also graduated from high school. After graduation in the late 1930s from the Traphagen School of Design in New York City with a bachelor's degree in fine arts, Mrs. Reed worked in the city's Garment District during the 1940s, designing stage sets used by fashion models and photographers.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 8, 2002
I PITY the Towson University mace-maker. Poor, anonymous fellow. One imagines that he was swelling with ideas, the likes of which the mace-making world has not seen since Canadian Rufus E. Butterworth attached a toilet tank float to a length of pipe and presented it for the opening ceremonies of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta in 1906. We can only imagine what scheme of shaft-and-orb the Towson mace-maker might have come up with had plans for the ceremonial utensil not been put on hold.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 23, 2000
* Item: Mrs. Butterworth's flavored syrups * What you get: At least 9 servings * Cost: About $3.10 * Preparation time: Pour from bottle * Review: Mrs. Butterworth is obviously aiming her newest syrups at the younger set. The kid-friendly flavors come in break-proof, drip-proof, easy-to-squeeze plastic bottles with sparkling labels. Truth be told, however, your inner child (and who doesn't have an inner child who still loves a big plate full of pancakes or waffles smothered in syrup?
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
The building at Annapolis' worst drug corner is battered and abandoned, riddled with bullet holes and filled with dead roaches. But for the Clay Street community, the two-story brick Butterworth Building is not a lost cause.By April 1, the city will put a police substation in the building at Clay and West Washington streets. Community activists hope to turn the building into a neighborhood outreach center.The Clay Street Improvement Association is working with the city's Planning and Zoning Department to tap government loans so that it can set up shop in the building.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 19, 1995
Washington. -- Do you spend more than one hour a day following the O.J. Simpson murder trial proceedings on television?Has your productivity at home or at work slipped as a result of monitoring the trial?Do you get angry if someone or something interrupts your viewing of the trial?Do you know the names of all the defense and prosecution attorneys?Is the Simpson coverage the first story you read in the newspaper?Do friends and family say that you are too involved in the Simpson-related events?
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 11, 2003
In the infancy of online mortgage lending, traditional lenders were caught off-guard by upstart companies that offered a simple way to compare loan rates, apply and get a decision quickly. Five years later, nearly every bank and credit union has a Web site where customers can do those things, and many of the pioneer online lenders - such as iOwn and Mortgage.com? - are dead, even if their Web addresses live on. But even with the Internet, closing a loan is complicated, and many borrowers still prefer to entrust the task to someone they can meet face to face.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
Lois Butterworth Reed, an artist, musician and social activist whose integrated Harford County art school for children was attacked by racists during the early 1960s, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Bel Air home. She was 84. Lois Butterworth was born and raised in Douglaston, N.Y., where she also graduated from high school. After graduation in the late 1930s from the Traphagen School of Design in New York City with a bachelor's degree in fine arts, Mrs. Reed worked in the city's Garment District during the 1940s, designing stage sets used by fashion models and photographers.
SPORTS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,Contributing Writer | October 10, 1992
America's Cup veteran John Kolius and the Nippon America's Cup Challenge's Robert Fry emerged as semifinal winners after a fast and furious day of sailing in brisk winds on the Patapsco River yesterday, and the two will face off shortly after 11 a.m. today in the final round of the 1992 Cadillac Columbus Cup regatta series.New Zealand's Brad Butterworth and France's Bertrand Pace, meanwhile, will meet in a petit final consolation round.Yesterday morning, the 14-flight double round-robin qualifying series came to an end, leaving Kolius and Pace, who had already been assured of slots in the semifinal round by Thursday evening, in first and second places, respectively.
SPORTS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,Contributing Writer | October 7, 1992
Yesterday's light winds off Fort McHenry confounded the top-ranked international match racers taking part in this year's Cadillac Columbus Cup Regatta, causing some upsets in the early standings set on Monday when the double round-robin portion of the regatta began.Despite the difficult conditions, three additional flights were completed in the round-robin series, bringing the total races to five.Olympic silver medalist Kevin Mahaney unexpectedly had to leave the regatta, but was expected to return before its conclusion; in his absence he turned the helm of his team to a crew member, Texan Doug Kern, who also earned a silver medal in the 1992 Olympics as middleman on Mahaney's Soling campaign.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.