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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
If your dessert choices are either vanilla or chocolate, it's time to discover the old-fashioned goodness of butterscotch. It's possible you haven't tasted its rich, deep flavor in years. Unfortunately, butterscotch isn't a trendy taste right now. But once you taste the mellow combination of butter, brown sugar and milk, butterscotch will become a favorite. You can dress butterscotch up or down. The most simple, and perhaps most comforting, dessert is plain pudding. If that's too spare, try butterscotch over a store-bought coffee cake, apple cake or pound cake.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
No matter what your feels are about religion, it's hard not to be charmed by a blessing of the animals. This one happened this week at the the Cathedral of the Incarnation, part of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland. Watch for little Butterscotch. I love him. (He was a good boy! He didn't bite the bishop!)
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NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | January 30, 2008
What's the difference between butterscotch and caramel? Before I answer, let's pause and say it together: "Mmmmm. Butterscotch." You just don't see enough butterscotch these days. So what's the difference? Technically, caramel is granulated sugar that has been melted and heated until it is brown but not burned, ranging from 320 to 350 degrees. You can add water to make it thinner, and you can add cream or milk to make soft caramel. (Add them carefully, though - hot sugar sputters like sugar lava.
NEWS
May 7, 2011
The Internet has crowd-sourced the mint julep, encouraging the addition of alien ingredients to this once hallowed beverage, the signature drink of today's Kentucky Derby. There was a time, before social media, when hidebound traditionalists mocked any change in the julep's sacred makeup of mint, simple syrup, crushed ice and Kentucky bourbon. Back in the 1920s, for instance, H. L. Mencken suggested using rye instead of bourbon, and his contemporary Irvin S. Cobb, objected mightily.
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | February 13, 2008
2007 Kim Crawford Unoaked Chardonnay From: Marlborough, New Zealand Price: $17 Serve with: Seafood, Asian cuisine Oak-free chardonnay is a white wine that is usually better in concept than execution because winemakers tend to reserve their best chardonnay grapes for fermentation in barrels. This fine producer apparently has gone oak-free with the good stuff. The wine is marvelously complex and fruity, with crisp flavors of pear, apple and citrus fruit, spices and butterscotch. Oak?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
No matter what your feels are about religion, it's hard not to be charmed by a blessing of the animals. This one happened this week at the the Cathedral of the Incarnation, part of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland. Watch for little Butterscotch. I love him. (He was a good boy! He didn't bite the bishop!)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 12, 2005
2003 Hahn Estates Monterey Chardonnay ($12). Every once in a long while, a value comes along that is so extraordinary that it deserves to be shouted from the rooftops. This California chardonnay is one of them. It's rich, buttery, deep, structured, complex and elegant - everything one would expect from a $50 chardonnay from some chic Napa Valley producer. The key, judging by the concentration of flavor, seems to have been the low vineyard yields forced on the producer by Mother Nature. The honey, vanilla, butterscotch and apple flavors are vibrant, and the lively acidity gives it a Burgundy-like finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Mary Cronkhite from Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe that her mother used to have for making a chocolate chip bar cookie using yellow cake mix, chocolate chips and honey. Patricia Finnegan from Towson sent in a recipe she has been using for a long time for making a simple and easy treat that her kids absolutely love. She says this recipe has come in handy many times for those last-minute requests for bake sale contributions or classroom snacks. Her recipe uses a yellow cake mix with chocolate chips, but I think the variations would be limited only by what you have on hand in your pantry.
NEWS
May 7, 2011
The Internet has crowd-sourced the mint julep, encouraging the addition of alien ingredients to this once hallowed beverage, the signature drink of today's Kentucky Derby. There was a time, before social media, when hidebound traditionalists mocked any change in the julep's sacred makeup of mint, simple syrup, crushed ice and Kentucky bourbon. Back in the 1920s, for instance, H. L. Mencken suggested using rye instead of bourbon, and his contemporary Irvin S. Cobb, objected mightily.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Whipped cream and corn is a dish to remember.Gulliver's creamed corn was the request of Wendy Doehne of Longview, Wash., and Lauri Gullickson of Sioux Falls, S.D., answered with chef Kent Rigby's choice.Gullickson wrote, "I received the recipe from a friend in 1981, and many dinner guests have enjoyed it ever since."Gulliver's creamed corn2 (10-ounce) packages frozen kernel corn1 cup whipping cream1 cup half and half1 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons sugarpinch of pepper2 tablespoons butter2 tablespoons flourParmesan cheese to sprinkle on topCombine first 6 ingredients and bring to a boil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Mary Cronkhite from Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe that her mother used to have for making a chocolate chip bar cookie using yellow cake mix, chocolate chips and honey. Patricia Finnegan from Towson sent in a recipe she has been using for a long time for making a simple and easy treat that her kids absolutely love. She says this recipe has come in handy many times for those last-minute requests for bake sale contributions or classroom snacks. Her recipe uses a yellow cake mix with chocolate chips, but I think the variations would be limited only by what you have on hand in your pantry.
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | February 13, 2008
2007 Kim Crawford Unoaked Chardonnay From: Marlborough, New Zealand Price: $17 Serve with: Seafood, Asian cuisine Oak-free chardonnay is a white wine that is usually better in concept than execution because winemakers tend to reserve their best chardonnay grapes for fermentation in barrels. This fine producer apparently has gone oak-free with the good stuff. The wine is marvelously complex and fruity, with crisp flavors of pear, apple and citrus fruit, spices and butterscotch. Oak?
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | January 30, 2008
What's the difference between butterscotch and caramel? Before I answer, let's pause and say it together: "Mmmmm. Butterscotch." You just don't see enough butterscotch these days. So what's the difference? Technically, caramel is granulated sugar that has been melted and heated until it is brown but not burned, ranging from 320 to 350 degrees. You can add water to make it thinner, and you can add cream or milk to make soft caramel. (Add them carefully, though - hot sugar sputters like sugar lava.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 12, 2005
2003 Hahn Estates Monterey Chardonnay ($12). Every once in a long while, a value comes along that is so extraordinary that it deserves to be shouted from the rooftops. This California chardonnay is one of them. It's rich, buttery, deep, structured, complex and elegant - everything one would expect from a $50 chardonnay from some chic Napa Valley producer. The key, judging by the concentration of flavor, seems to have been the low vineyard yields forced on the producer by Mother Nature. The honey, vanilla, butterscotch and apple flavors are vibrant, and the lively acidity gives it a Burgundy-like finish.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
If your dessert choices are either vanilla or chocolate, it's time to discover the old-fashioned goodness of butterscotch. It's possible you haven't tasted its rich, deep flavor in years. Unfortunately, butterscotch isn't a trendy taste right now. But once you taste the mellow combination of butter, brown sugar and milk, butterscotch will become a favorite. You can dress butterscotch up or down. The most simple, and perhaps most comforting, dessert is plain pudding. If that's too spare, try butterscotch over a store-bought coffee cake, apple cake or pound cake.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Whipped cream and corn is a dish to remember.Gulliver's creamed corn was the request of Wendy Doehne of Longview, Wash., and Lauri Gullickson of Sioux Falls, S.D., answered with chef Kent Rigby's choice.Gullickson wrote, "I received the recipe from a friend in 1981, and many dinner guests have enjoyed it ever since."Gulliver's creamed corn2 (10-ounce) packages frozen kernel corn1 cup whipping cream1 cup half and half1 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons sugarpinch of pepper2 tablespoons butter2 tablespoons flourParmesan cheese to sprinkle on topCombine first 6 ingredients and bring to a boil.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 7, 2007
Barbara Kempisty of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for biscuits that can be made completely in the microwave. She wanted to be able to prepare the dough in advance and take it to an elderly aunt who is in assisted living and does not have a kitchen but does have access to a microwave. Hope Weiner of Rapid City, S.D., sent in a recipe for whole-wheat microwave biscuits. These biscuits are made with a combination of whole-wheat and white flour. The dough can be made in advance, and the biscuits can be made in the microwave.
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