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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 26, 1996
BOSTON -- I am careening through the supermarket, speed-shopping down my Thanksgiving list, when I arrive at the poultry aisle. A vast landscape of turkeys stretches down the 50-yard chiller.Before me lie tons of turkey, boulders of birds, glistening piles of plastic-wrapped, plucked and prepared poultry. These domestic creatures bred to elephantine proportions are lined up breast-by-breast waiting for the customers.I have come fowling, as the Pilgrims described their hunt, for the requisite creature, a bird bearing 25 pounds of flesh on its bones.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
While Butterball, the nation's largest turkey producer, said it was facing a shortage of fresh, large birds weeks before Thanksgiving, Maryland's poultry giant Perdue said it would have no trouble meeting demand. "Perdue is not experiencing any shortage of turkeys for Thanksgiving," said spokeswoman Julie DeYoung. "Our customers place their turkey orders well in advance of the holiday, and we have sufficient supply to meet those orders. " Butterball said its poultry had trouble gaining weight on some of its farms but did not explain why. The company still has ample supplies of its frozen large varieties, which are birds 16 pounds and heavier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
While Butterball, the nation's largest turkey producer, said it was facing a shortage of fresh, large birds weeks before Thanksgiving, Maryland's poultry giant Perdue said it would have no trouble meeting demand. "Perdue is not experiencing any shortage of turkeys for Thanksgiving," said spokeswoman Julie DeYoung. "Our customers place their turkey orders well in advance of the holiday, and we have sufficient supply to meet those orders. " Butterball said its poultry had trouble gaining weight on some of its farms but did not explain why. The company still has ample supplies of its frozen large varieties, which are birds 16 pounds and heavier.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS and LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTERS | November 16, 2005
It's time to talk turkey. Hot-line operators are standing by to answer your questions about preparing the Thanksgiving bird, but we found some will give you more complete answers than others. We put seven consumer hot lines to the test, asking them questions about the best way to roast and carve the turkey and how to prepare it safely. The hot lines we called were: Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, Perdue consumer help line, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Meat and Poultry Hot Line, Foster Farms Turkey Helpline, Shady Brook Farms, Empire Kosher poultry hot line and Reynolds Turkey Tips Line.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | July 5, 2000
Item: Butterball Chicken Requests Grilled Breast Tenders What you get: 3 servings Cost: About $5 Preparation time: 3 1/2 to 5 1/2 minutes in microwave, 13 to 15 minutes in conventional oven Review: Butterball turkeys have been welcome at our Thanksgiving table for as long as I can remember. I have to honestly say, however, that I would prefer the company's new chicken tenders never darken my door again. The tenders were moist - a Butterball trademark. Unfortunately, they were also chewy, with a distinct processed meat flavor.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 15, 2000
Item: Butterball One-Step Stuffing What you get: 4 one-half cup servings Cost: About $1.89 Nutritional content: Cornbread - 150 calories; 3 grams fat; 0.5 gram saturated fat; 590 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 8 to 8 1/2 minutes in microwave, 10 minutes on stove top, 25 to 35 minutes in conventional oven Review: I had an ulterior motive when I bought this new stuffing mix from Butterball. I wondered if the one-step directions would decrease the Thanksgiving Day workload.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | November 15, 1995
Butterball talks turkey via InternetWho says turkeys aren't smart? They've got their own address on the World Wide Web. It's part of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, which offers advice on how to handle the holiday bird. The talk line can be reached by phone at (800) 323-4848. Hours are: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays through Nov. 22; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 18-19; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thanksgiving Day; and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 24-Dec. 22. For 24-hour-a-day information from "electronic grandmothers," including tips on roasting a turkey, making gravy and recipes, the Internet address is http://www.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1991
HOW BIG OF a turkey do you need? Plan on three-quarters of a pound per serving if the turkey is more than 12 pounds; one-pound per serving if the bird weighs 12 pounds or less.Do you have a turkey question? Call the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line. This toll-free hot line available to callers nationwide who have questions about cooking their Thanksgiving and Christmas turkeys.Forty-four trained home economists and nutritionists are available with answers to any turkey preparation question, from how much to buy to properly storing leftovers.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS and LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTERS | November 16, 2005
It's time to talk turkey. Hot-line operators are standing by to answer your questions about preparing the Thanksgiving bird, but we found some will give you more complete answers than others. We put seven consumer hot lines to the test, asking them questions about the best way to roast and carve the turkey and how to prepare it safely. The hot lines we called were: Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, Perdue consumer help line, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Meat and Poultry Hot Line, Foster Farms Turkey Helpline, Shady Brook Farms, Empire Kosher poultry hot line and Reynolds Turkey Tips Line.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | November 20, 1994
*The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline: (800) 535-4555, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.*Land O' Lakes toll-free Holiday Bakeline: (800) 782-9606, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. until Dec. 24.*The Butterball help line: (800) 323-4848, for English- and Spanish-speaking callers, or (800) TDD-3848, for hearing- and speech-impaired cooks, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. weekdays until Wednesday; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. today; and 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Thanksgiving Day. From Friday until Dec. 23, the hours are 8 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 15, 2000
Item: Butterball One-Step Stuffing What you get: 4 one-half cup servings Cost: About $1.89 Nutritional content: Cornbread - 150 calories; 3 grams fat; 0.5 gram saturated fat; 590 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 8 to 8 1/2 minutes in microwave, 10 minutes on stove top, 25 to 35 minutes in conventional oven Review: I had an ulterior motive when I bought this new stuffing mix from Butterball. I wondered if the one-step directions would decrease the Thanksgiving Day workload.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | July 5, 2000
Item: Butterball Chicken Requests Grilled Breast Tenders What you get: 3 servings Cost: About $5 Preparation time: 3 1/2 to 5 1/2 minutes in microwave, 13 to 15 minutes in conventional oven Review: Butterball turkeys have been welcome at our Thanksgiving table for as long as I can remember. I have to honestly say, however, that I would prefer the company's new chicken tenders never darken my door again. The tenders were moist - a Butterball trademark. Unfortunately, they were also chewy, with a distinct processed meat flavor.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 26, 1996
BOSTON -- I am careening through the supermarket, speed-shopping down my Thanksgiving list, when I arrive at the poultry aisle. A vast landscape of turkeys stretches down the 50-yard chiller.Before me lie tons of turkey, boulders of birds, glistening piles of plastic-wrapped, plucked and prepared poultry. These domestic creatures bred to elephantine proportions are lined up breast-by-breast waiting for the customers.I have come fowling, as the Pilgrims described their hunt, for the requisite creature, a bird bearing 25 pounds of flesh on its bones.
FEATURES
By Janice Wald Henderson and Janice Wald Henderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 20, 1996
I'll never forget my first attempt at carving a Thanksgiving turkey before guests. As my friends were admiring the golden bird, I plunged my fork into the turkey breast and the supermarket-wrapped giblet bag flew out of the neck cavity and onto the lace tablecloth.A vote was taken around the table as to what possessed a redder hue -- my face or the cabernet.Disasters like mine are what keep the Turkey Talk-Line -- the hapless cook's holiday hand-holder -- ringing off the hook. Butterball says its toll-free number receives more than 270,000 annual pleas for help.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | November 15, 1995
Butterball talks turkey via InternetWho says turkeys aren't smart? They've got their own address on the World Wide Web. It's part of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, which offers advice on how to handle the holiday bird. The talk line can be reached by phone at (800) 323-4848. Hours are: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays through Nov. 22; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 18-19; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thanksgiving Day; and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 24-Dec. 22. For 24-hour-a-day information from "electronic grandmothers," including tips on roasting a turkey, making gravy and recipes, the Internet address is http://www.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | November 15, 1995
Thanksgiving dinner gives even seasoned cooks the jitters. And it's no wonder. The traditional feast is the most trumped-up meal of the year, yet it's one we never practice. How often do you make turkey, gravy and trimmings for 12?Not to despair.When the burden of Thanksgiving dinner rests solely with you, it's still possible to create a fine traditional meal without burning out before the guests arrive.With careful menu selection, planning and a few turkey pointers, you can roll out a feast that would make Grandma proud.
NEWS
By Eben Shapiro and Eben Shapiro,New York Times News Service .... | November 25, 1991
Riding on the tail feathers of the chicken, turkeys have surged in popularity in the last decade, and now turkey farmers have their eyes on a glittering prize: the potentially lucrative market of fast-food chains and restaurants.Dreaming of McTurkey, turkey farmers are grinding up meat and experimenting with spices and seasonings in the quest for a place on America's menus. The industry needs a lift, as overenthusiastic growers have produced too many turkeys, driving prices to their lowest level in recent memory.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | November 20, 1994
*The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline: (800) 535-4555, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.*Land O' Lakes toll-free Holiday Bakeline: (800) 782-9606, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. until Dec. 24.*The Butterball help line: (800) 323-4848, for English- and Spanish-speaking callers, or (800) TDD-3848, for hearing- and speech-impaired cooks, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. weekdays until Wednesday; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. today; and 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Thanksgiving Day. From Friday until Dec. 23, the hours are 8 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | November 19, 1993
Before gobbling down Thanksgiving dinner this year, pause for a tribute to turkeys. Not the domesticated bird -- better known as a bumbling, barnyard butterball -- but the wily, wild turkey.In "Turkey's Gift to the People," Ani Rucki has created her own version of a Navajo tale that stars Turkey in a role of which he can boast: He's the hero, not the roast.Ms. Rucki grew up in Columbia and is a 1988 graduate of the University of Maryland. "Turkey's Gift to the People" (Northland Publishing, $14.95, 32 pages, ages 4-8)
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