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By Colleen Pierre, R.D | November 26, 1991
Can good taste and good health coexist at Thanksgiving dinner?Yes. Especially if you bear in mind that diet-over-time is more important than any single eating event. Lighten up on fat and calories for a few days before and after the fabulous feast. Then moderate indulgence on the big day will average out.For your festival meal, focus fat where it will most affect taste. Eliminate fat where it will go unnoticed.Start with a fresh fowl, which is naturally more juicy and delicious than a frozen one. Avoid "self-basting" birds that add superfluous saturated fat to your naturally heart-healthy centerpiece.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2009
Sandra Fedder of Arcata, Calif., was looking for a recipe for sweet potato casserole with a pecan crust. Eleonore Severe of Baltimore sent in a recipe for a sweet potato souffle that she says was published in her church's cookbook. This recipe is very easy to make and it tasted delicious, almost like a pie without a crust. I decided to cook the sweet potatoes in the microwave but you also could bake them or even used canned ones if you wanted. The souffle was light and airy, although somewhat on the sweet side.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2007
Anna Pitt of Fallston was looking for a recipe for what she thought was called a Smearcase Cheesecake. It was made with cottage cheese and had a thin layer of crust on the bottom. She thinks that the recipe came from a free recipe booklet put out by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. some years ago. Carole Wagner of Middle River still had a copy of the cookbook published by BGE called Maryland Classics, which had the recipe that Pitt was looking for in it. (The book calls it smierkase cake; in German, schmierkase means smeared cheese.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2009
Linda Everett of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe from the 1980s that she had misplaced. It's for a poundcake made with cottage cheese. She said it was "moist and tasty - only needed a sprinkle of powdered sugar on top to make it the perfect dessert." Nancy Simmons of Salisbury, N.C., sent in a recipe she has used for many years for a cottage-cheese poundcake. I think the best poundcakes are made with real butter, so I tested her recipe using a good-quality unsalted butter. The cake had a lovely texture and flavor.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2009
Linda Everett of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe from the 1980s that she had misplaced. It's for a poundcake made with cottage cheese. She said it was "moist and tasty - only needed a sprinkle of powdered sugar on top to make it the perfect dessert." Nancy Simmons of Salisbury, N.C., sent in a recipe she has used for many years for a cottage-cheese poundcake. I think the best poundcakes are made with real butter, so I tested her recipe using a good-quality unsalted butter. The cake had a lovely texture and flavor.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 15, 1992
Getting a meal on the table in 30 minutes or less is no strange new phenomenon of the 1990s.Cookbook publishers have been churning out quick cookbooks on a regular basis during the past decade. But not all are created equal. Some of these supposed quick cook menus make your kitchen look like the aftermath of a tornado; it takes more time to clean up the mess than it takes to prepare the meal.Whether you are judging the quick-cook menu in a cookbook or developing one on your own, remember one basic: Keep it simple.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2007
Eva Watts of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for an old-fashioned butterscotch pie. She has a fond memory of one her mother used to make using brown sugar and "country butter" that she churned herself. Helen Cahill of Santa Rosa, Calif., shared her family recipe for Grandma's Butterscotch Pie. What I especially liked about Cahill's recipe was that it called for a vanilla-wafer crust instead of the more traditional baked pastry crust. The cookie crust added just a little extra something to a pie that is really nothing more than butterscotch custard topped with slightly sweetened meringue.
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By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | November 15, 1992
The first Thanksgiving, celebrated by a group of American Indians and European immigrants, gave thanks for the autumn bounty. It was held some time between Sept. 21 and Nov. 9, 1621. By 1647, the state of Connecticut had made a day of thanksgiving an annual event, but Thanksgiving as we know it wasn't made a national holiday until nearly 250 years later under President Abraham Lincoln.Today, we still celebrate with many of the same foods that graced many early Thanksgiving tables.Thanksgiving means being grateful for what we have and not wasting food -- and in this busy season, time is precious and not to be wasted, too. Here's a quick and easy-to-microwave version of a traditional dish that is perfect for holiday entertaining.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | November 7, 1990
What a difference a year makes. Not too long ago many of us were of the "It's my tummy and I'll buy what I want to" school of grocery shopping. Price mattered least of all. Quality and saving time were the things we were willing and able to pay for.But during the last few months, economic uncertainty has hit us right in the stomach. And, now, even those who filled their grocery carts with boneless, skinless chicken breasts, raspberry vinegar and gourmet take-out are beginning to look at their pocketbooks as well as their cravings.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2004
Brenda J. Gregory of Fayetteville, N.C., is seeking a pumpkin-pie fudge like that she purchased at a craft fair in Fayetteville in early November. Letta Drake of Lowell, Ariz., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Recipe requests William J. Maurer of Canton, Ohio, is seeking a recipe using red beets. "I can't eat leafy vegetables and would love one or some recipes for this." Sandra K. Green of Millersville briefly wrote: "I would like a recipe for homemade ravioli with meat."
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2007
Florence Belton of Baltimore was trying to find a recipe for an oatmeal cake. She tried the cake while she was working as a nurse in the 1960s, but can't remember how the cake was made. Sandra Miller of Winchester, Va., saw Belton's request and immediately thought of her recipe for "Lazy Daisy Oatmeal Cake" that was given to her by a friend of her mother's. She says she has been making the cake for at least 30 years and everyone always loves it. This is a simple spice cake that is very moist and yummy.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2007
Anna Pitt of Fallston was looking for a recipe for what she thought was called a Smearcase Cheesecake. It was made with cottage cheese and had a thin layer of crust on the bottom. She thinks that the recipe came from a free recipe booklet put out by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. some years ago. Carole Wagner of Middle River still had a copy of the cookbook published by BGE called Maryland Classics, which had the recipe that Pitt was looking for in it. (The book calls it smierkase cake; in German, schmierkase means smeared cheese.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2007
Eva Watts of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for an old-fashioned butterscotch pie. She has a fond memory of one her mother used to make using brown sugar and "country butter" that she churned herself. Helen Cahill of Santa Rosa, Calif., shared her family recipe for Grandma's Butterscotch Pie. What I especially liked about Cahill's recipe was that it called for a vanilla-wafer crust instead of the more traditional baked pastry crust. The cookie crust added just a little extra something to a pie that is really nothing more than butterscotch custard topped with slightly sweetened meringue.
NEWS
By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,McClatchy-Tribune | December 13, 2006
With holiday cooking here, you're bound to be in this pickle at least once. "You believe you have everything you need and then, in the middle of preparation, you find out you're missing an ingredient," says Susan Mills-Gray, nutrition and health-education specialist for the University of Missouri Extension in Harrisonville. She keeps these three lists taped inside her favorite cookbook for quick reference. For the complete lists, visit the extension's Web site: extension.missouri.edu/extensioninfonet.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2006
Dian Mehrer from Rapid City, S.D., was seeking a recipe for "Jeans Bars." These rich bar cookies were made with lots of butter, sweetened condensed milk, chocolate chips and nuts, and had a shortbreadlike bottom layer. She said they are "guaranteed to make your jeans tight - thus the name." Ruth Charles, also of Rapid City, had the recipe Mehrer was looking for. It came from the 1983 Pillsbury Classic, No. 30, "Best Recipes." She says that she has made this recipe with great success many times and that it has been a family favorite.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2004
Brenda J. Gregory of Fayetteville, N.C., is seeking a pumpkin-pie fudge like that she purchased at a craft fair in Fayetteville in early November. Letta Drake of Lowell, Ariz., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Recipe requests William J. Maurer of Canton, Ohio, is seeking a recipe using red beets. "I can't eat leafy vegetables and would love one or some recipes for this." Sandra K. Green of Millersville briefly wrote: "I would like a recipe for homemade ravioli with meat."
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2009
Sandra Fedder of Arcata, Calif., was looking for a recipe for sweet potato casserole with a pecan crust. Eleonore Severe of Baltimore sent in a recipe for a sweet potato souffle that she says was published in her church's cookbook. This recipe is very easy to make and it tasted delicious, almost like a pie without a crust. I decided to cook the sweet potatoes in the microwave but you also could bake them or even used canned ones if you wanted. The souffle was light and airy, although somewhat on the sweet side.
NEWS
By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,McClatchy-Tribune | December 13, 2006
With holiday cooking here, you're bound to be in this pickle at least once. "You believe you have everything you need and then, in the middle of preparation, you find out you're missing an ingredient," says Susan Mills-Gray, nutrition and health-education specialist for the University of Missouri Extension in Harrisonville. She keeps these three lists taped inside her favorite cookbook for quick reference. For the complete lists, visit the extension's Web site: extension.missouri.edu/extensioninfonet.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Sue Schatz of Abingdon requested a potato-chip-cookie recipe. Claramarie Trombetta of Timonium responded. She wrote that the recipe has been a favorite of her family and friends for many years, and she hoped it would be for Sue. Recipe requests Michelle Lilja of Greensburg, Pa., writes, "I'm looking for a Kahlua cake recipe. I had this cake at a party but did not get the recipe." Julie Polansky of Easthampton, Mass., writes, "I am desperately seeking a recipe known to me as Ed's Mexican Lasagna.
FEATURES
By ELLEN HAWKS and ELLEN HAWKS,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
"There is a restaurant in Story, Ind., which people come to from all over. They make the most wonderful seafood lasagna I have ever had," wrote Kim M. Hajduk of Fox River Grove, Ill. "The thought makes my mouth water. I haven't been there in about six years but I've been searching for this recipe and can't find it."Joanne Kibler of Wrightsville, Pa., contributed the recipe selected by our food tester, Laura Reiley.M. Vonita Bordine of Baltimore requested a recipe for a crispy drop cookie called chocolate Rice Krispies.
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