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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
At this time of year, back in the old days, the Easter cry sailed through the alleys of Baltimore."Who's got an egg?Who's got an egg?Chicken with a wooden leg!Who's got a guinea-ghi?Who's gonna pick-a-me?"The challenge was one of a basket full of Easter traditions peculiar to Baltimore, rituals that included parades, butter shaped like lambs, and Easter Monday picnics in Druid Hill Park; customs that have faded with time.The cry of "Who's got an egg?" would bring youngsters out of their homes, ready to do battle with hard-boiled eggs dyed in shades of blue and pink and yellow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Mary Beth York from Niles, Mich., was copying some old recipes a friend had collected over the years and stuck in the back of a cookbook from 1942 when she came across one called "Crisco Breath o' Spring" cake. Unfortunately, there was some damage to the recipe and she was unable to read parts of it. Apparently, the recipe was on the label of a can of Crisco, but when York contacted the Crisco company, she was told that they do not save all their old recipes and no longer had the one she was looking for. York was hoping someone still had the recipe and would be willing to share it with her. Diane Jensen from Alamogordo, N.M., sent in the recipe for the cake York was looking for that Jensen said was copied from a photograph of the original Crisco advertisement from 1945.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2009
Linda Watkins of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for a type of cookie that her grandmother used to make. She called them "old butter cookies." She would take dough cut into squares and put a pat of old butter and some sugar into the center, then fold the corners into the center and bake. Alice Nulle of Woodstock, Ill., sent in a recipe for what she calls Butter Squares. It sounds just like what Watkins' grandmother used to make except, thankfully, it does not call for old butter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Bernie Moran from Baltimore was in search of the recipe for the butter cake that was sold at Brown's bakery in the late 1950s. The bakery, located on Belnord Avenue in East Baltimore, has been closed for many years, like many other small bakeries. Nonetheless, it seems many people still long for some of the special baked goods that were sold at these neighborhood spots. Ruanne Lori from Parkville sent in a recipe for a butter cake that she said appeared in this column more then 30 years ago. She also used to live in East Baltimore and remembers buying delicious butter cake from a bakery not far from Belnord Avenue.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | August 8, 2007
Charles Warner of Santa Rosa, Calif., was searching for a recipe for making peanut butter. Kathleen Kosinski of North East looked through several of her cookbooks and found a recipe for homemade nut butter in her copy of Best Recipes from the Backs of Boxes, Bottles, Cans and Jars by Ceil Dyer. This recipe is a cinch to make provided you have a food processor or blender. It can be made with almost any type of nut, salted or unsalted, depending on your preference. I tested it with dry-roasted and salted peanuts, which I processed with vegetable oil and honey until smooth.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 18, 2008
On a recent sweltering Sunday morning, I prowled the farmers' market in downtown Baltimore looking for something interesting to take home and fix for lunch. There were a lot of flowers and radishes for sale. While I know you can eat flowers - I once had a terrific salad flecked with nasturtiums at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif. - I leaned toward the radishes. As someone who has grown radishes, I have come to believe that they are a lot like children. When they arrive, you are filled with joy. But you quickly learn that their appeal peaks in their young and tender stage.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 15, 2010
A drizzly Flag Day and wet flags hang on their little poles stuck in the grass along our street. The child asks, "Why the flags?" So you talk about the meaning of the flag, that we Americans are one people, despite our contrariness, and you go on too long about this in the coffee-grinder voice of adulthood, but it's June, School Is Out, time to simply enjoy America and not try to explain it. One of the beauties of fatherhood is the small miracle...
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
To Illinois via North Carolina, a favorite cake has landed where it should.Karen Budzinski of Crystal Lake, Ill., asked for a peanut-butter cake recipe which "my neighbor's mother made when she was living. The cake is now a memory and no one seems to know how to make it," she wrote.Julia Holland of Fayetteville, N.C., answered. "This recipe comes from a cookbook with a copyright date of 1947. I collect cookbooks, and I hope this is what she wants. It is surprisingly good."Holland's peanut-butter cakeServes 122 cups plus 2 tablespoons cake flour5 3/4 teaspoon baking soda3/4 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon baking powder1/3 cup butter1/3 cup peanut butter1 1/3 cups sugar2 medium eggs2/3 cup buttermilk1/3 cup orange juiceHeat oven to 350 degreesGrease 2 9-inch layer-cake pans, line bottoms with wax paper and grease paper.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | August 8, 1999
A little butter goes a long way when it's lightened and seasoned with interesting ingredients. Seasoned butters -- also known as composed, compound or flavored butters -- are a blend of unsalted butter and seasonings, spices, herbs, fruits or vegetables.Few sauces are simpler to prepare than seasoned butters: Just mix the flavoring ingredients into the softened butter by hand or mixer and refrigerate for at least an hour to firm the butter and meld the flavors.Serving seasoned butters couldn't be easier: Bring the butter to room temperature and, at the last minute, spoon a little onto the hot food.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL & JANE STERN and MICHAEL & JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | January 20, 1991
MILWAUKEE -- Although our business is searching out unique regional specialties wherever we travel, our hobby is hamburgers. No matter how remarkable and exotic the local culinary passion might be -- from Santa Fe's carne adovada to southern Indiana's turtle soup -- you can be sure that if you are in America, there are innovative and interesting culinary twists on the hamburger somewhere nearby; and it is our pleasure, between sampling the regional trademarks,...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Anne Arundel County police say they've arrested a Naval Academy midshipman after he allegedly threatened a taxi driver with a butter knife. Police say a cab driver told them he drove two men from a bar in Annapolis to a home on Bay Head Road on the Broadneck Peninsula early Sunday morning. One of the men went into the home to get money for the fare, but returned without enough money, according to police. The two then ran into the house, and one of the men returned with a knife and ran toward the cab driver, who was in the driveway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Glyndon Grill is all about casual comfort. But don't confuse that with being sloppy. The restaurant, which opened in October in the Butler Road space formerly occupied by Mia Carolina, feels upscale but it lacks the pretension that "upscale" sometimes involves. With friendly service and a kitchen turning out familiar and mostly well-executed comfort food, Glyndon Grill has already become a popular neighborhood spot. Scene & Decor The town of Glyndon is charming, historic and horsey, and Glyndon Grill fits right in. Though the space is newly renovated, horse country signage and historic photos capture the essence of the village.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 1, 2013
Whoa! There is a ton of heavy stuff to discuss from Sunday night's midseason finale of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, but first, a serious question: Is the Governor really dead? I know that we saw him get stabbed through the center of the back and chest with Michonne's Shinobi sword, and then we saw Lilly stand over him and fire her gun in the direction of his head. But we never actually saw him die. I've learned that in shows like these - "The Walking Dead", " Magnum, P.I. ", " Legends of the Hidden Temple " - that a character isn't actually dead and gone until we see their rotten, decomposing carcass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Dorothy Miller from Towson was looking for a recipe for what she called "Oriental fruitcake. " She said the layer cake was made with pineapple, coconut, walnuts and raisins. Faith Hermann from Relay sent in a recipe for a Japanese fruitcake that her mother used to make that she thought sounded very similar to the cake Miller had described. According to Bill Neal, author of "Biscuits, Spoonbread, and Sweet Potato Pie," Japanese fruitcake is "an exotically named, typically Southern dessert cake, especially popular in the twentieth century.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 8, 2013
Part of Baltimore's Vacants to Value program, aimed at reducing vacant houses and blight across the city, calls for aggressive and streamlined enforcement of the housing code. That means heavy fines to owners who don't take care of their vacant houses. And if fines don't get action, the city will push a property to auction. Tom Karle was the top bidder for one such house in February. It's an end-of-group rowhouse on Bayonne Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. Karle, owner of Summerfield Investment Group, is a landlord who owns numerous houses in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette
The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
Really, I wanted to have scallops for dinner, served outdoors on our back porch. But the Celebrating Heroes triathlon in Columbia was early the next morning and I felt like I should be carbo-loading with a pasta. And then there were all the greens that needed to be eaten in the fridge I decided to try to simplify the last Swiss chard and pasta recipe I made, and this time make the Swiss chard a side dish. That way, if it failed compleletly, I could still have the pasta -- and scallops.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2005
Belinda Lehto from Monmouth, Ore., was seeking a recipe for a restaurant-style Peanut-Butter Pie that was " fluffy, smooth and creamy." Latoya Williams of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe she found in a Carolina Country magazine published by her electric co-op. What made her recipe stand out was that it was made with real whipping cream as opposed to Cool Whip and that it had a chocolate-wafer crust. It made an extremely rich and creamy pie. The chocolate and the peanut butter are a great taste combination.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1991
THIS DELIGHTFUL CONCOCTION with its dark brown and dark yellow swirls is perfect Halloween fare. Slice it thin -- it's very rich -- and you can serve 14 to 16 of your favorite goblins. This recipe is adapted from a super new book "365 Great Chocolate Desserts" by Natalie Haughton; Harper Collins Publishers -- 1991, $16.95.Halloween cheesecake2 cups creme-filled peanut butter cookie crumbs (we used Nutter Butters)5 tablespoons butter, melted1 cup milk chocolate morsels or peanut butter-flavored morsels, optional2 1/2 pounds cream cheese, softened1 1/2 cups sugar6 eggs2 teaspoons vanilla extract10 ounces semisweet chocolate, melted1 cup smooth or crunchy peanut butterPreheat oven to 350 degrees.
FEATURES
May 28, 2013
Anchors Aweigh Deviled Crab Deviled crab is a take on crab cakes. Instead of mixing bread crumbs with the crab to form a patty, a crab mixture is topped with the crumbs, then baked. This recipe was reprinted with permission from "Of Tide and Thyme," a cookbook published by The Junior League of Annapolis. Makes 4-6 servings 1 tablespoons butter, divided 2 tablespoons chopped onion 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 2 eggs, beaten 1/2 cup bread crumbs, divided 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound crab meat, shell and cartilage removed Paprika for sprinkling 1. Preheat oven to 450°.
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