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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 22, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After weeks of blaming each other for the outbreak of fighting between their followers, black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi plan to meet next month to discuss the violence plaguing black townships.But the Oct. 5 meeting will not be the one-on-one affair that MrButhelezi has sought with Mr. Mandela ever since the African National Congress deputy president was released from prison in February. Instead, the ANC has invited Mr. Buthelezi to a meeting that will include leaders of all 10 of South Africa's tribal homelands.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1994
STANGER, South Africa -- What Nelson Mandela once envisioned as a day of national reconciliation instead became a symbol of dangerous divisions yesterday among this country's 7 million Zulus.Thousands of Zulus crowded into this small town amid the sugar cane plantations of Natal, gathering at the grave of Shaka, the 19th-century warrior who founded the Zulu nation.They came even though their king, Goodwill Zwelithini, had asked them not to. They came because Mangosuthu Buthelezi, head of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said that they should.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A prominent black leader accused Nelson Mandela's political organization yesterday of trying to seize power and of taking actions that would lead to civil war in South Africa.The verbal attack by Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi signaled the collapse of a 2-month-old peace accord between Mr. Mandela's African National Congress and Mr. Buthelezi's Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party, the ANC's major black rival.It also created another problem for South Africa's already-jeopardized peace process, which is supposed to result in an end to apartheid and the drafting of a new democratic constitution for this racially divided country.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
When a distinguished international blue ribbon panel was finally called in to mediate South Africa's internal dispute in ZTC advance of elections, it was a dispute between two black political parties, not between the old white power structure and the racially dispossessed.And it was for this that former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger returned to international diplomacy and public life after 17 years in the private sector as a business consultant and pundit.Mr. Kissinger leads a team of seven distinguished figures who command respect, including Lord Carrington, the former British defense and foreign secretary, and A. Leon Higginbotham, a leading African-American jurist who has retired as chief judge of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | November 26, 1992
Johannesburg, South Africa -- In a major breakthrough, black leaders Nelson Mandela and Mangosutho Buthelezi have agreed to put their war of words aside and hold a peace conference, it was announced yesterday.Mr. Mandela's African National Congress and Mr. Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party have been locked in a deadly rivalry that has stalled South Africa's transition to democracy.The ANC's national executive committee also abandoned its long opposition to power-sharing with the government.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- The South African reform process was dealt a blow yesterday by Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, who said he would not talk with the government as long as it was making private deals with the dominant black African National Congress.Mr. Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said he would not abide by any agreements struck between the government of President F. W. de Klerk and the ANC led by Nelson Mandela."Either we will have bilateral negotiations between the government and the ANC, which will lead to the victory of revolutionaries . . . or we will have multilateral negotiations leading to a fair, race-free democracy in which the ANC is one party among many," he said.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 13, 1990
THOKOZA, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela and Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi came to this scarred black township yesterday to try to quell the factional violence that has ripped it apart.But instead of presenting a united front for peace, the two leaders arrived separately and spoke at highly partisan events. Mr. Buthelezi's followers came armed with spears, sticks, shields and battle axes. About 2,000 listened to their leader blame the African National Congress for the violence.Thousands of Mr. Mandela's backers waved ANC flags at a rally in a squatter camp where hundreds of shacks have been burned during raids.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1994
STANGER, South Africa -- What Nelson Mandela once envisioned as a day of national reconciliation instead became a symbol of dangerous divisions yesterday among this country's 7 million Zulus.Thousands of Zulus crowded into this small town amid the sugar cane plantations of Natal, gathering at the grave of Shaka, the 19th-century warrior who founded the Zulu nation.They came even though their king, Goodwill Zwelithini, had asked them not to. They came because Mangosuthu Buthelezi, head of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said that they should.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The roller coaster of emotions in the buildup to South Africa's first multiracial elections took an upswing yesterday as Mangosuthu Buthelezi indicated that he might not boycott the vote.He said he would provisionally register his Inkatha Freedom Party for the elections in late April. This was a breakthrough.The statement came at the end of a day-long meeting in Durban between Mr. Buthelezi and Nelson Mandela, head of the African National Congress (ANC), during which the two men agreed to seek international mediation for their disputes over the country's new constitution.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1994
DURBAN, South Africa -- The battle for Natal, which has led to an increasing amount of bloodshed in black townships over the last week, took to the streets of this coastal city yesterday with a huge, peaceful, display of support for the African National Congress (ANC).An estimated 50,000 marchers gathered here in the first of what ANC officials say will be a series of actions in response to the threats of Mangosuthu Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party to resist violently any attempt to hold the election April 26-28 in Natal.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- the Zulu chief who opposed both apartheid and trade sanctions -- was once praised as the black who would save South Africa from communist domination. Now he is denounced as the obstructionist who could drag it into civil war.The four weeks remaining between now and South Africa's first multiracial elections will tell whether he is reduced to a historical footnote. He and his Inkatha Freedom Party are boycotting the vote, certain to be won by his avowed enemy, Nelson Mandela's African National Congress (ANC)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1994
DURBAN, South Africa -- The battle for Natal, which has led to an increasing amount of bloodshed in black townships over the last week, took to the streets of this coastal city yesterday with a huge, peaceful, display of support for the African National Congress (ANC).An estimated 50,000 marchers gathered here in the first of what ANC officials say will be a series of actions in response to the threats of Mangosuthu Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party to resist violently any attempt to hold the election April 26-28 in Natal.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The roller coaster of emotions in the buildup to South Africa's first multiracial elections took an upswing yesterday as Mangosuthu Buthelezi indicated that he might not boycott the vote.He said he would provisionally register his Inkatha Freedom Party for the elections in late April. This was a breakthrough.The statement came at the end of a day-long meeting in Durban between Mr. Buthelezi and Nelson Mandela, head of the African National Congress (ANC), during which the two men agreed to seek international mediation for their disputes over the country's new constitution.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | January 18, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Goodwill Zwelithini, king of the Zulus, made the journey yesterday that so many leaders of indigenous people have made over the centuries -- to see the white rulers of his country to talk about his status.But there was one major difference in this meeting that generated a tempestuous demonstration yesterday. His meeting with South African President F. W. de Klerk was to discuss his future when black rule comes to this country after the April 27 election.King Goodwill faces the loss of some power after elections.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | October 25, 1993
DURBAN, South Africa -- The African National Congress flexed its political muscle yesterday with a display of strength in the middle of the territory claimed by its biggest rival for the black vote.Drawn in part by Nelson Mandela, the ANC leader, and in part by promises of entertainment and traditional healers, about 60,000 people overflowed King's Park, a stadium that the weekend before had held a gathering of white South Africans drawn to a championship rugby game -- the closest thing this country has to the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 27, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Faced with the loss of exclusive political power after 45 uninterrupted years, white Afrikaners who formed the backbone of the ruling National Party are abandoning the party, many of them drifting toward conservative blacks in a desperate search for new allies.For the past several months, large numbers of conservative whites have defected to the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party led by Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi. Others have fled to the once-demoralized white right wing, which has now rallied behind a group of popular retired generals.
NEWS
July 28, 1991
The admission last week that South Africa's white-ruled government secretly funded political rallies of the Inkatha Freedom Party confirmed suspicions about a tacit alliance to undermine political support for the African National Congress.While both the government and Inkatha have attempted to distance themselves from the scandal, it is not news that successive white-ruled governments have always given support to Inkatha, while the Zulu-based movement has largely absented itself from the mainstream anti-apartheid struggles led by other groups since the late 1970s against white rule.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | November 26, 1992
Johannesburg, South Africa -- In a major breakthrough, black leaders Nelson Mandela and Mangosutho Buthelezi have agreed to put their war of words aside and hold a peace conference, it was announced yesterday.Mr. Mandela's African National Congress and Mr. Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party have been locked in a deadly rivalry that has stalled South Africa's transition to democracy.The ANC's national executive committee also abandoned its long opposition to power-sharing with the government.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 11, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- In the turbulent world of South African politics, Mangosuthu Buthelezi is making his last stand, and he is summoning his tribe's ancient warrior tradition to the task.Chief Buthelezi, this country's most prominent Zulu leader, is relying on the ethnic pride of the nation's Zulus to wage a life-and-death struggle with the African National Congress, which has displaced the Zulu kingdom as the most formidable black force in South Africa.Inkatha is considered a conservative black organization, which promotes free enterprise, while the ANC has a large number of communists in its ranks.
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