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July 22, 2012
I am sorry that Marta H. Mossburg and her family are leaving Butchers Hill in search of better schools for their kindergartner ("Bye-bye, Baltimore; we'll miss you, but it was time to go," July 18). Parents, before you leave Southeast Baltimore take a look at the innovative school in your own backyard! Archbishop Borders Catholic School is a dual-language, pre-K-to-8th grade school, moving in August to the Sacred Heart parish campus at Foster and Conkling streets. For less than $5,000 tuition per year, Ms. Mossburg's child could have joined the new model of Spanish-English immersion in a loving, orderly and enriching environment.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
When Stephen Huppaty, owner of OzCorp Fine Builders, moved to Baltimore from Australia in 1997, he was intrigued by an interesting appendage to the miles of brick row houses -- rooftop decks. In the following years, these playpens in the sky would continue popping up in neighborhoods like Fells Point, Federal Hill, Locust Point, Butchers Hill and Canton. To Huppaty, it made perfect sense. In the tight confines of these neighborhoods, owners wishing to put additions on their row homes could either go back (given sufficient room)
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
From the sidewalk in front of the Butchers Hill home of Jay Rubin and Frank Mondimore, a reminder unique to Maryland sport gives passers-by pause. Stubby and banged-up duckpins, alongside shiny bowling trophies, line the sills inside of two street-level windows. Next to that hometown image, a flower urn sits on a concrete slab in front of double oak doors, their arched windows reflecting the corner grocery store across the street. The brick exterior looks new, providing a clue that this house is a relatively recent arrival to the block.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Brockett Horne and her husband, Chris Tesluk, say they chose their city home with the flip of a coin. "Chris works in College Park and I teach at MICA; we ended up choosing Baltimore over D.C.," says Horne, a 40-year-old graphic artist. "We wanted an old house and close to a park. The city suits us … there is so much going on. " The couple purchased a three-story Butchers Hill rowhouse near Patterson Park in 2008 for $182,000. A former barbershop, it hadn't been occupied in 20 years.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Marianne Fishman's three-story townhouse in Butchers Hill is a reflection of her life's work as an interior designer while also giving credence to Row House Interiors, the design company she owns. "When we bought the house, it was a total disaster," she recalled. "But we got it well under the market price. " She and her husband, Larry Fishman, 55, president of All-State Career School in South Baltimore, settled on their East Baltimore home in April 2006. By October of that year, they were able to move in, thanks to the work of the many contractors she uses in her business.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2003
The 24th annual Butchers Hill house tour is scheduled next week, with the Southeast Baltimore neighborhood association opening 12 historic homes to the public. The Baltimore neighborhood is north of Fells Point and Canton. The event is scheduled from noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 12. Tickets are $15 the day of the tour and $12 in advance. For more information, log on to www.butchershill.org or call Anne Belcher at 410-675-2795 or Sue Noonan at 410-522-6773.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | November 11, 2007
The view from Butchers Hill -- atop a three-level veranda with restored wrought iron scrollwork -- is a sweeping panoramic shot of downtown Baltimore, the harbor and Patterson Park. The inside of this hilltop house is also striking in scope and architectural detail, evoking the historic prosperity of a neighborhood that predates the Civil War. Over the decades, Butchers Hill was known as a home for tradesmen, industrialists, merchants and professionals. "This was a grand house," said owner Todd Vaughan, who has restored several other houses on the street.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2004
The Butchers Hill Association will hold its 25th annual house tour next weekend with proceeds going to the group's education fund. The neighborhood, bounded by Washington Street to Patterson Park and Pratt to Fayette streets, includes a variety of housing and architectural styles. Twelve homes will be included in the tour. The event is scheduled for noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 17. It will begin at the White House, at the Patterson Park entrance at Lombard Street and Patterson Park Avenue. Tickets can be purchased for $15 the day of the tour and $12 in advance.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1997
When John Murphy and Jennine Auerbach started house-hunting six years ago, they began their search for a Victorian-styled home in Roland Park, then settled on a townhouse in Butchers Hill."
BUSINESS
By Charles Cohen and Charles Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2000
Situated on a summit above Fells Point and Canton, Butchers Hill has the kind of homes that seduce new homebuyers. Common is the story of the couple who went on a house tour and became so enamored of the Butchers Hill atmosphere that they became residents as quickly as they could get to the settlement table. Some foolishly try to resist the neighborhood's spell. Dawn Letellier and Mike McGrail went on the Butchers Hill annual house tour two years ago and then rented an apartment in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
For Lawrence Peterson, the redevelopment of his Mount Vernon neighborhood was every bit as much of a calling as his 20 years in the U.S. Navy. As friends and neighbors paid tribute to the "Mayor of Mount Vernon" on Sunday evening, they recalled a man so passionate about their area of the city that he would drop in to invite neighbors over or nudge them to clean up their front stoops. The community leader died Friday, two years after he was critically injured in a shooting near the Belvedere Hotel on the first block of East Chase Street, where he lived with his husband, Tom Sabia.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Marianne Fishman's three-story townhouse in Butchers Hill is a reflection of her life's work as an interior designer while also giving credence to Row House Interiors, the design company she owns. "When we bought the house, it was a total disaster," she recalled. "But we got it well under the market price. " She and her husband, Larry Fishman, 55, president of All-State Career School in South Baltimore, settled on their East Baltimore home in April 2006. By October of that year, they were able to move in, thanks to the work of the many contractors she uses in her business.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
For every newcomer to Baltimore, the story of what brought about the move is varied, but there is often a common theme: a desire to sample city life. The O'Beirnes are no different, but the couple's approach to settling in Butchers Hill involved a bit of trial and error. "When all of our children moved away from home, we decided to try city living," said Andrew "Drew" O'Beirne, 69, a retired president of a biotech startup company. "Over the next few years, we purchased houses in different areas until we found Butchers Hill and its welcoming community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 18, 2013
Water for Chocolate chef/owner Sean Guy calls his food "sexy comfort cuisine. " We're not sure about the "sexy" part, but his capable take on traditional Southern comfort food is definitely impressive. Guy cut his teeth in chain restaurants - think Hard Rock Cafe - but Water for Chocolate is anything but corporate. Operated out of a corner storefront in Butchers Hill, the restaurant dishes up breakfast, lunch and dinner to a steady stream of loyal, local customers. Scene & Decor With soda cases lining one wall, a path to the bathroom that winds through the kitchen and a weeknight closing time of 7 p.m., Water for Chocolate sometimes feels more like a carryout than a sit-down restaurant.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Trent Waite wasn't new to the Butchers Hill area when he purchased a home there three years ago. He simply exchanged the renovated one he already had in the Baltimore neighborhood for another that was in desperate need of fixing up. His reasoning was sound: It wasn't enough to be near historic Patterson Park, he had to live directly across the street from it. Today, the view from a front bedroom on the third floor of his now-restored circa 1883...
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Sunday, July 7, is the 30th anniversary for Morning Edition Cafe in Butchers Hill. It's also its last day. After three decades, Brian Beaven is closing up his Vermont-style cafe, where the specialty was always breakfast, even in the early years when it was also served dinner. When it opened in 1983, Morning Edition was one of the city's first restaurants to specialize in brunch, and few Baltimoreans back then were familiar with the Butchers Hill neighborhood, much less thought of it as a dining destination.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Despite protests from some Butchers Hill residents, a small but pricey cluster of townhouses was unanimously approved yesterday by Baltimore's Planning Commission. E.R. Bacon Development and Stonington Partners proposed turning a former machine shop at the southeast corner of Pratt and Chester streets into six four-level town homes. The two-story brick building would be demolished to make way for three-bedroom homes with two-car garages that would cost $650,000 each. The community's main concern, said David Dyer, president of the Butchers Hill Association, was that the new housing would be built on property zoned commercial, which would allow the developer to build higher than on residentially zoned land.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Trent Waite wasn't new to the Butchers Hill area when he purchased a home there three years ago. He simply exchanged the renovated one he already had in the Baltimore neighborhood for another that was in desperate need of fixing up. His reasoning was sound: It wasn't enough to be near historic Patterson Park, he had to live directly across the street from it. Today, the view from a front bedroom on the third floor of his now-restored circa 1883...
NEWS
July 22, 2012
I am sorry that Marta H. Mossburg and her family are leaving Butchers Hill in search of better schools for their kindergartner ("Bye-bye, Baltimore; we'll miss you, but it was time to go," July 18). Parents, before you leave Southeast Baltimore take a look at the innovative school in your own backyard! Archbishop Borders Catholic School is a dual-language, pre-K-to-8th grade school, moving in August to the Sacred Heart parish campus at Foster and Conkling streets. For less than $5,000 tuition per year, Ms. Mossburg's child could have joined the new model of Spanish-English immersion in a loving, orderly and enriching environment.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | July 17, 2012
My family moved out of Baltimore City last week, making Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of adding 10,000 new families in a decade a little bit harder to achieve. We were the second family on our block in Butchers Hill to leave in a month. In my family's case, the city will lose three people. Five are moving out and two are moving in. No house is abandoned. Cars will park in our former spaces and life will go on in Baltimore City, population 619,500, much like before.
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