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By BILL ORDINE | July 17, 2008
Next to this is a column about mixed martial arts light-heavyweight Forrest Griffin, who won an Ultimate Fighting Championship title July 5. The day after the upset win over Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, Griffin had a seat in the World Series of Poker main event. The seat cost $10,000, but an online poker site paid the fee, and Griffin reflected on that and other perks that could come with being a champion MMA fighter. "The thing with anything - remember why you're there," Griffin said. "People pay me to come here and play poker.
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SPORTS
January 29, 2013
Yes: PGA Championship Teddy Greenstein Chicago Tribune He showed us power. He showed us touch. The only winning trait Tiger Woods didn't have at Torrey Pines was patience. He got frustrated Monday when the tortoises in front of him caused his round to take nearly four hours. Four hours for 11 holes. Woods is impatient. He has not won a major since he limped to a playoff victory at the 2008 U.S. Open. Last year he teased us time and again. He won two weeks before the Masters.
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SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,Los Angeles Times | May 10, 2007
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- As soon as there was enough light to play Tuesday morning, Tiger Woods began his practice round at Sawgrass, where you don't have to look too far to see there's a great deal at stake out there in the fairway grass. Besides the PGA Tour-record $9 million prize money of The Players Championship, the stakes continue to grow this week for Woods, and everyone else chasing him. This is certainly no tournament to be taken lightly, not with 48 of the top 50 ranked players showing up in the 145-player field.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Phil Mickelson pulled out of the Memorial Tournamenton Thursday after shooting a first-round 79. He didn't make any excuses. He didn't say that his well-documented psoriatic arthritisflared up or that he had tweaked the wrist that has given him problems over the years. He blamed it on being tired from the European vacation that he and his wife Amy had taken last week and that he had not come prepared to play in the tournament hosted by the legendary Jack Nicklaus. Mickelson said he needed to spend more time on the range with his swing coach, Butch Harmon, before theU.S.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune newspapers | June 19, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Before Phil Mickelson went on a late afternoon birdie binge Friday, the most interesting name on the U.S. Open leaderboard was the generic "Johnson." Dustin Johnson has the power to obliterate par-5s, the experience to navigate Pebble Beach's slopey, fickle greens and a caddie who sounds as if he should have sunscreen on his nose and a surfboard in his arm. "Dude," caddie Bobby Brown said, "we have a vibe going." Johnson already has won twice here, triumphing at the last two AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Ams.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013
Yes: PGA Championship Teddy Greenstein Chicago Tribune He showed us power. He showed us touch. The only winning trait Tiger Woods didn't have at Torrey Pines was patience. He got frustrated Monday when the tortoises in front of him caused his round to take nearly four hours. Four hours for 11 holes. Woods is impatient. He has not won a major since he limped to a playoff victory at the 2008 U.S. Open. Last year he teased us time and again. He won two weeks before the Masters.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain | March 17, 2011
The way Tiger Woods sees it, the makeover is no more radical than a baseball player showing up with a new batting stance. Hands high, hands low. Upright or hunched, open stance or closed. Same instrument, different style. Cal Ripken Jr. 's many stances never endured such scrutiny whenever he went 1-for-14 in a weekend. Then again, the insight Woods offered last week had the effect of hearing David Ortiz was being converted to a singles hitter. "I have to change everything," Woods said in one of his more unguarded revelations.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Phil Mickelson pulled out of the Memorial Tournamenton Thursday after shooting a first-round 79. He didn't make any excuses. He didn't say that his well-documented psoriatic arthritisflared up or that he had tweaked the wrist that has given him problems over the years. He blamed it on being tired from the European vacation that he and his wife Amy had taken last week and that he had not come prepared to play in the tournament hosted by the legendary Jack Nicklaus. Mickelson said he needed to spend more time on the range with his swing coach, Butch Harmon, before theU.S.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 17, 2000
BREATHTAKING success, an odyssey almost too storied to be real, has accompanied Tiger Woods in his phenomenal stampede through the golf jungle. Is there any other avenue of sports in which a single individual has dominated the competition with a similar minimum of effort? Yes. His name was Joe Louis, the heavyweight boxing champion of the world from 1937 through 1948. Admittedly, there is little that's analagous between boxing and golf. One is all-out physical, while the other requires a more passive approach.
SPORTS
August 7, 2008
BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP, Mich. - Rich Beem stood over his tee shot on the 18th hole during his final practice session for the PGA Championship, trained his eye down the narrow fairway squeezed between bunkers, waggled his driver and then backed off. "This is the hardest hole I've ever played," he said yesterday. Then he smoked his tee shot with the slightest draw and saw it hop to the left on a canted fairway and disappear into the bunker. "And it just got harder," he said before walking off. That was just the 498-yard closing hole at Oakland Hills.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain | March 17, 2011
The way Tiger Woods sees it, the makeover is no more radical than a baseball player showing up with a new batting stance. Hands high, hands low. Upright or hunched, open stance or closed. Same instrument, different style. Cal Ripken Jr. 's many stances never endured such scrutiny whenever he went 1-for-14 in a weekend. Then again, the insight Woods offered last week had the effect of hearing David Ortiz was being converted to a singles hitter. "I have to change everything," Woods said in one of his more unguarded revelations.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune newspapers | June 19, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Before Phil Mickelson went on a late afternoon birdie binge Friday, the most interesting name on the U.S. Open leaderboard was the generic "Johnson." Dustin Johnson has the power to obliterate par-5s, the experience to navigate Pebble Beach's slopey, fickle greens and a caddie who sounds as if he should have sunscreen on his nose and a surfboard in his arm. "Dude," caddie Bobby Brown said, "we have a vibe going." Johnson already has won twice here, triumphing at the last two AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Ams.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 17, 2008
Next to this is a column about mixed martial arts light-heavyweight Forrest Griffin, who won an Ultimate Fighting Championship title July 5. The day after the upset win over Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, Griffin had a seat in the World Series of Poker main event. The seat cost $10,000, but an online poker site paid the fee, and Griffin reflected on that and other perks that could come with being a champion MMA fighter. "The thing with anything - remember why you're there," Griffin said. "People pay me to come here and play poker.
SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,Los Angeles Times | May 10, 2007
PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- As soon as there was enough light to play Tuesday morning, Tiger Woods began his practice round at Sawgrass, where you don't have to look too far to see there's a great deal at stake out there in the fairway grass. Besides the PGA Tour-record $9 million prize money of The Players Championship, the stakes continue to grow this week for Woods, and everyone else chasing him. This is certainly no tournament to be taken lightly, not with 48 of the top 50 ranked players showing up in the 145-player field.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 17, 2000
BREATHTAKING success, an odyssey almost too storied to be real, has accompanied Tiger Woods in his phenomenal stampede through the golf jungle. Is there any other avenue of sports in which a single individual has dominated the competition with a similar minimum of effort? Yes. His name was Joe Louis, the heavyweight boxing champion of the world from 1937 through 1948. Admittedly, there is little that's analagous between boxing and golf. One is all-out physical, while the other requires a more passive approach.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 13, 2008
For a big fella, that John Daly really gets around. Just two days ago, I was writing about Daly's weekend and how it seemed like he was headed in a real bad direction from the way things went on the Florida Gulf Coast. He had failed to make a cut again this year, was hanging out drinking beer at a place called the Hooters Owl's Nest off the 17th hole and then burned some time at the Philadelphia Phillies' spring training camp when he could have been working on his short game. I caught some heat from Daly fans whose basic message was: Lighten up and get off the guy's case.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1993
SANDWICH, England -- Of all the things Greg Norman buried in the ancient linksland at Royal St. George's on Sunday, the most important was his dangerously escalating image as golf's biggest cartoon character.Until he beat Nick Faldo and Bernhard Langer at the 122nd British Open, Norman was The Great White Shark -- hitting the ball a mile, spinning it back off greens, shooting at island greens with 1-irons. Sometimes he won, more times he lost. Either way, it was bigger than life.But Norman is human, not a cartoon fish, and if there is a single key to his stirring victory, it is that at age 38, he has come to understand that it is the little things that make champions.
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